The Evidence For Sugar

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How do we get to the left side of this image rather than the right?

 

Probably not with sugar!

 

See the evidence – and read more here

 

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You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

Five People Who Need To See Their GP (But May Not Realise It)

The Runner

 

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Whether you’re already an experienced runner or a complete novice, setting goals — like running a half marathon — can provide the motivation to lace-up those runners each day. But when you’re tackling longer distances and putting your body under more strain than usual, it’s worth keeping in mind that checking in with your GP can ensure you reach the finish line injury free. “A GP might say, ‘let’s have a look at you, what’s your height and weight? Is your time frame realistic?” says Dr Tellis. “They might advise you to look out for shin splints, or what to do if you’re experiencing shortness of breath or chest pains.” And let’s be real, we’re not all just born with a runner’s physique. So if you are concerned about getting in better shape for the big race, it’s worth raising with your doctor. “For a half-marathon, we’d also be advising what you should be eating and drinking and how many calories you should be consuming on a daily basis,” Dr Tellis says.

 

 

The Soon-To-Be Traveller

 

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Whether you’re planning a tour of Europe, a week partying in Bali or a volunteering trip to Africa, your GP can offer you a wealth of advice. That includes options for travel vaccinations, food safety measures to take abroad, and what to include in your first-aid kit. “I also recommend to everyone get the best travel insurance they can afford and to take a close look at the exclusions in there,” says Dr Tellis. “For example, if you go to Bali and get on a scooter after drinking beers, you may not be covered by travel insurance — the cost of medical repatriation from Bali to Australia could be as high as six figures.”

 

 

 

The Couple Planning A Family

 

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You don’t need to wait until you fall pregnant for a trip to the GP — their advice can assist all couples with a healthy conception and pregnancy, by looking at your lifestyle and what might need changing from diet, to sleep, smoking, alcohol and drug consumption. “For women, you want to be taking vitamins with the right amount of folate. You want to be making sure your cervical screening (the new term for the old pap smear test), dental checks and rubella vaccination is up to date and that you’ve had your flu shot,” says Dr Tellis. “For guys, you want to be sure you’re not smoking dope or drinking too much, you want to be looking after your weight and your partner as well.”

 

 

The Exhausted Gym Rat/Bunny

 

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What happens when you think you’re healthy — and hitting the gym regularly — but still feeling exhausted or in pain? A trip to the GP can help pinpoint the cause, and advise on how you can change your training regimen to avoid injury. “A lot of men will hit the gym and do things likely to cause an injury or problem down the track… or they’ll find that big guy at the gym who has some interesting pharmaceuticals of his own. Again, that’s something we can give advice on,” says Dr. Tellis. Meanwhile, women may be suffering from undiagnosed mineral deficiencies, leading to tiredness. “A lot of women can be iron deficient,” explains Dr Tellis, who says he’d ask: “How much sleep are you getting, what are you doing in the gym, is it sustainable to be working 50 hours a week and getting up at 5am daily for Crossfit? Is your thyroid okay, are you getting enough calories in?”

 

 

The Stressed Out Comfort Eater

 

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When you’re working long hours and feeling stressed, it can be easy to find yourself regularly turning to unhealthy fast food lunches or indulging in sugar-filled snacks. While it may be something you feel reluctant to bring up, there are plenty of lifestyle suggestions, resources and referrals that a GP can provide, as well as simply lending a supportive ear. “Part of the skill of being a GP is picking your moments to start a conversation about delicate subjects. Some people come in ready to talk about their weight, some do not. I generally take a weight as part of my routine clinical review/examination, and discuss as I, and the patient, feel appropriate,” says Dr Tellis. He explains there are plenty of ways a GP could assist someone with issues stemming from stress and over eating. It may be a discussion about healthy diet — including good food choices, a better routine and when to eat — or stress management advice, and if necessary, a psychology or counselling referral. “What I would like to say as a doctor is that the door is open. Come in and say hello. You set the agenda as the patient.”

 

*Originally published here

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

Sore Throats at Partridge Street General Practice

Spring is here but it has been a big flu season at Partridge Street General Practice!

 

 

 

What should you do when you have a cough, cold, or sore throat?

 

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This may have helped before getting ill…

 

 

Here’s some information:

 

 

Do I have the flu?

 

 

 

Should I be on antibiotics?

 

 

 

My ear is sore?

 

 

 

Should I be immunised?

 

 

 

How do I stay healthier?

 

 

Any other ways to stay healthier?

 

 

Got anything else?

 

 

 

And, of course, What should I do instead?

 

 

There’s a new paper, at the link, saying this:

 

 

 

steroids in sore throat at Partridge Street General Practice

 

 

 

Need more information? Leave a comment or see us in person.

 

 

 

We’re Here to Help!

 

 

 

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You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Check Your Skin with Dr Nick Mouktaroudis at Partridge Street General Practice

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis is a GP and co-owner at Partridge Street General Practice. He’s  passionate about health education, has a special interest in Skin, and a lot of expertise to share when it comes to helping people cope with and improve Skin Conditions. Let’s hand over to Dr Nick!

 

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What is a Skin Check?

 

 

A Skin Check is a Comprehensive Skin History and Examination which is done at Partridge Street General Practice.

 

Your GP will ask you questions to assess the extent of Your risk/exposure to UV radiation and Your risk of solar related cancers.

 

They will examine you head to toe, examining the skin surface, focusing on any areas of concern (including the eyes, mouth, and anywhere else you may have noticed any spots, lumps, or bumps).

 

 

 

Are there any tools used for the Skin Check?

 

 

A proper examination needs proper equipment and we use handheld LED illumination with magnification as well as polarised light and clinical photography.

 

skin check dr nick mouktaroudis light

A dermatoscope is used to examine specific skin lesions. This is a particular type of handheld magnifying device designed to allow the experienced examiner to further assess skin lesions and determine whether they are suspicious or not.

 

 

 

Who should have a Skin Check?

 

We encourage all Australians over the age of 40 to have a Skin Check annually. Australians have one of the highest rates of skin cancers in the world.

 

Australians who have above average risks should be having Skin Checks before the age of 40 and sometimes more than annually.

 

You should have a Skin Check at any age if You are concerned about Your skin or particular skin lesions/areas.

 

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We ask You to identify any lesions of concern prior to the Skin Check wherever possible.

 

These may include new lesions that You have noticed or longstanding lesions that may be changing in some way or that You are concerned about. If You are worried – Ask!

 

Skin cancer check risk dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Risk factors for skin cancer

 

 

 

People at higher risk of skin cancer are those who:

 

have previously had a skin cancer and/or have a family history of skin cancer

have a large number of moles on their skin

have a skin type that is sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and burns easily

have a history of severe/blistering sunburns

spend lots of time outdoors, unprotected, during their lifetime

actively tan or use solariums or sunlamps

work outdoors

 

 

 

 

Does My GP take photos of My Skin?

 

 

 

During a skin check at Partridge Street General Practice Your GP will ask Your Specific Consent to take photos if they are concerned or want to make note of a particular skin lesion.

Photographs are useful as an adjunct to description of the lesion and act as a reference to position and comparison if required.

The photos will be uploaded onto Your Private Medical Record at Partridge Street General Practice.

 

 

 

What if My GP finds something?

 

 

 

This will depend on what Your GP has found.

 

If they are concerned about a particular skin lesion they may suggest a biopsy to clarify the diagnosis.

 

A biopsy is a surgical procedure during which they take an appropriate sample of tissue from the lesion of concern and send it to a pathologist for review.

 

Generally pigmented lesions (coloured spots), will be biopsied in their entirety whereas non pigmented skin lesions may be sampled partially if the lesion is too large to sample in its entirety.

 

The results of the pathology report will guide further treatment.

 

Your GP may elect to treat without a biopsy if they are confident of the diagnosis.

 

This may include freezing/cauterising a lesion, cutting it out (excising), or offering topical treatments such as creams.

 

Biopsies are scheduled in the Partridge Street General Practice theatre and our Practice Nurse will assist Your GP.

 

 

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What do I wear for a Skin Check?

 

 

 

Comfortable clothing.

 

Your GP will ask to examine you down to your underwear.

 

A sheet or towel will be provided for you to preserve your comfort and dignity.

 

A chaperone (Our Practice Nurse) is always offered.

 

Please avoid makeup or nail polish as the Skin Check involves the face and skin under the nails.

 

 

 

 

How long is a Skin Check?

 

 

Allow half an hour for Your GP to perform a thorough history and examination.

 

 

 

 

Do I need to see My GP or should I see a dermatologist?

 

 

GPs are Primary Care Physicians on the front line of Skin Cancer detection.

All GPs can check your skin, though not all GPs have formal training or a specific interest in skin cancer medicine and dermatoscopy.

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis has trained extensively in General Practice, Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery, and has formal qualifications in Skin Cancer Medicine.

Dermatologists are sub-specialists in all skin conditions including Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery although some will focus on other skin conditions.

 

 

 

 

Can I do more than a Skin Check?

 

 

 

You can Reduce Your risk by:

Avoid unnecessary exposure to the sun

Wearing sunscreen regularly and on all sun exposed areas.

Wear Hats and Sunglasses when appropriate.

Be aware of Your skin – both You and Your partner can check at Home.

 

 

 

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Book Your Skin Check Right Here.

 

 

 

Need more information? Leave a comment or see us in person. We’re Here to Help!

 

 

 

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You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Lemons and Lemonade

We live in an age of wonders. Generations past would be amazed by the ease of travel, free information, and the standard of living enjoyed by the majority of the Western world. One of these wonders is Modern Medicine and part of that is medications. We are privileged to live in a time when cancer can be cured, fatal diseases are controlled, and previously life curtailing conditions can be managed.

 

‘Nothing is all good and nothing is all bad’ is something I heard from a trusted friend. Does this apply to medications? General Practitioners are Your Specialist Generalists – we do a LOT more than just prescribe medications! Read on.

 

 

Oseltamivir

 

Lemon: This blockbuster drug was supposed to deliver us all from pandemic flu. The Australian government stockpiled it at a cost of many millions. It will expire before we do. It promised the world but perhaps shortened the duration of symptoms by not much.

Lemonade: Get a yearly influenza vaccine and if you’re unlucky enough to still get the flu – rest, fluids, paracetamol, and see Your GP if you’re not improving as you think you should.

 

 

Donezepil

 

 

Lemon: Life expectancy increases every year and so do our expectations of our older age. This drug promised an end to Alzheimer’s, later downgraded to ‘it may delay the rate of the decline in your mental abilities’. How would we know if it worked? What would have the rate of decline been without this drug?

 

donepezil lemon

Lemonade: Save your money and try some alternatives without side effects. Keep your mind and body as healthy as possible for as long as possible with diet, exercise, rest, and the support of family, friends, and Your GP. Should age related decline set in, there are many supports you can access – check out My Aged Care. Medications can play a role – ask!

 

 

Codeine

 

 

Lemon: This drug has been available over the counter at pharmacies for many years. Evidence shows that products with low dose codeine are no more effective than products without for pain relief and so the regulatory authorities have recommended it be rescheduled to prescription only from February 2018. This will be a big change for the community – some of whom will have been taking large amounts of this drug on a regular basis.

 

 

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Lemonade: Partridge Street General Practice is proud to be a low prescribing practice and especially of this drug. Our advice is to see us for advice on alternatives and non drug alternatives in particular.

 

 

 

Need more information? Have you any other lemonade thoughts? Leave a comment or see us in person. We’re Here to Help!

 

 

 

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You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

The New Royal Adelaide, Ramping Up and Down, and Health Pathways

Hi from South Australia! Winter is here but change is coming. Our flagship hospital and one of the most expensive buildings in the Southern Hemisphere, the New Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH), is about to come online in September after a 2 year wait.

 

 

Bernie Cummins (see below) previously spoke to the Southern Regional GP Council about Outpatients Services in SA and she generously spoke to us again about how things will proceed over the coming months and years.

 

 

Here is some information she prepared.

 

royal adelaide hospital and nRAH and outpatients and health pathways

 

You can find further information right here.

 

 

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

So, as a public service, we’re Here to Help! Bernie Cummins (Director of Nursing Statewide Outpatient Reform) has provided the following documents to help GPs and patients navigate this system and avoid the ‘named referral bounce’.

 

 

 

 

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Good luck, and may the odds be ever in your favour!

 

 

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You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Welcoming Dr Penny Massy-Westropp to Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Penny undertook her medical training at the University of Adelaide prior to travelling to the UK to complete a Diploma in Anaesthetics. She then worked in WA & SA while completing Fellowship in General Practice. Bringing 21 years of GP experience to Partridge Street General Practice, she also has an ongoing commitment to Indigenous health with regular visits to remote NT communities.

 

 

 

She loves the local Glenelg area and is keen to hit the ground running with the rest of our Great Team here at Partridge Street!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We look forward to having Dr Penny Massy-Westropp as part of our growing Clinical Team and sharing her experience with us and our valued patients.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional. Comprehensive. Empowering.

 

 

 

 

See just how we do it here.

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

Welcoming Dr Monika Moy to Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Monika Moy graduated from the University of Adelaide in 1991 and after training in various Adelaide hospitals and general practices, completed her general practice qualification in 1996.

 

 

Dr Monika has particular interests in preventive health, women’s health and contraception and is trained to insert and remove the Implanon contraceptive device.

 

 

She is accredited for Obstetric Shared Care which involves providing part of a patient’s pregnancy care in conjunction with public hospitals and particularly enjoys this aspect of her practice.

 

 

Dr Monika is enthusiastic about explaining her patients’ conditions to them so that they have a better understanding of their health.

 

 

 

Special interests:

 

Women’s Health including contraception and menopause

 

Chronic disease management

 

Cardiovascular (heart disease) risk factor reduction

 

 

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

 

 

 

We are very excited to have Dr Monika Moy share her experience and skills with our valued patients as part of our growing Clinical Team!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional. Comprehensive. Empowering.

 

 

See just how we do it here.

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

Welcoming Dr Katherine Astill to Partridge Street General Practice

General Practice – A Great Career

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill will commence her specialist General Practice training with Partridge Street General Practice in August 2017. She graduated with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy from the University of South Australia in 2009 and furthered her education with a Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery from Deakin University in 2013. After holding positions with the Muscular Dystrophy Association and the Women’s and Children’s Hospital, she has decided to specialise in General Practice, with a special interest in Women’s and Children’s Health completing her Diploma of Child Health in 2016.
Dr Katherine has a passion for holistic care and preventative health.

 

 

 

She loves the local Glenelg area and is keen to hit the ground running with the rest of our Great Team here at Partridge Street!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx.

 

 

 

This means that the GPs at Partridge Street General Practice are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

 

Teaching Practice of the Year

 

 

All of our doctors here at Partridge Street General Practice are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.
We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at Partridge Street General Practice with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

 

We look forward to having Dr Katherine Astill as part of our growing Clinical Team and sharing her General Practice training journey with us.

 

 

 

 

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Professional. Comprehensive. Empowering.

 

 

 

 

See just how we do it here.

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

Childhood Cancer Association, City to Bay, and Partridge Street General Practice 

‘Tis better to give than receive.

 

 

Donate to Childhood Cancer Association here

 

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is glad to announce that we’ll be raising money for Childhood Cancer Association by running (or walking) at the City to Bay 2017.

 

 

Join our Team here!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last year was a great success with plenty raised for Zaidi Ya Dreams orphanage and we hope to improve this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

So get your runners on and run, walk, and give! You’ll feel better!

 

 

Donate to Childhood Cancer Association here

 

 

Doctor’s orders! 😉👍

 

 

 

 

 

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis