For a Hard Earned Thirst

A great Christmas message from the excellent Dr Raines!Ā šŸ‘

 

 

Bottoms up!Ā šŸ„›šŸ„›šŸ„›šŸ„›šŸ„›Ā via For a Hard Earned Thirst

 

 

 

You can see any of our Great Team Partridge GPs right here:

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

The Last Referral

 

rey offers pen for luke to do a referral
Rey offers a pen to Luke to write a Referral

 

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

 

Dr Mark Raines has written an excellent piece on the role of referrals – I’ve taken some sections and highlighted them below, but you can read the whole piece here.

 

 

In Australia you donā€™t need a Referral to seeĀ a (sub-) Specialist.Ā So,Ā say you wanted to see aĀ PlasticĀ Surgeon about a skin lesion, you can justĀ find a Plastic Surgeon on the internet or ask a friend and make an appointment and off you go. But be prepared for a bill ā€“ sometimes a really big bill. This is because, youĀ wonā€™t be able to access a Medicare rebate for the Plastic Surgeonā€™s fees.Ā To do so you need to first have a validĀ referral from your GP. But it is not as simple as just calling your GP and asking for a referral.

 

 

 

 

Referrals from a GP are valid for 12 months whereas referrals from one sub-specialist to another are only valid for 3 months (for example when the surgeon that fixes your knee refers to the medical specialist to look after your heart). GPs can also do INDEFINITE referrals – for when you are seeing the same sub-specialist for the same problem for a long period of time (for example when a heart specialist is looking after an ongoing heart problem). Remember though, often your GP can manage your ongoing conditions very well together with your sub-specialist – saving you money and making it more convenient for you!

 

 

 

There are, however, rules!

 

 

 

Backdating Referrals

As a Referral is a legal document, Medicare does not permit backdating a Referral.

A Specialist can see a patient without a valid referral only in an emergency. Apparently, if your dog ate your referral, or another goodĀ excuse,Ā thereĀ is a exemption available for you to claim your rebate if theĀ Specialist notes that the ā€œReferral is lostā€. I am sure that Medicare would getĀ suspiciousĀ if this happened a lot. Medicare do audit what GPā€™s and Specialists get up to make sure the rulesĀ areĀ being followed.Ā ThereĀ are fines for not following the rules!

If you need a Referral make sure you see your GP before seeing the Specialist if you wish to get a Medicare rebate for the service.Ā Asking your GPĀ for a backdated Referral is like asking the Specialist to forward date your consultation so you can get a Referral. Both are not permitted under Medicare.

 

 

Some more rules and regulations.

 

 

 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

 

So when You need a referral – or it’s time to manage Your health more conveniently – You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Dude, where’s my Outpatients?

Hi from South Australia! Summer has come! Our flagship hospital and one of the most expensive buildings in the Southern Hemisphere, the New Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH), came online in September 2017 after a 2 year wait.

 

 

nRAH New Royal Adelaide Hospital

 

 

 

Another big change to the South Australian Hospital System is that the Repatriation General Hospital is gone. Where did the subspeciality clinics go? See below!

 

 

Right Here!

 

arrow down

 

 

 

RGH Clinics – Quick Reference Guide as at November 2017

 

 

 

SALHN Outpatient Clinics Locations and Details

 

 

 

4th Generation Rehab Clinics

 

 

 

 

Bernie Cummins (see below) previously spoke to the Southern Regional GP Council about Outpatients Services in SA and she generously spoke to us again about how things will proceed over the coming months and years.

 

 

 

Here is some information she prepared.

 

 

 

 

royal adelaide hospital and nRAH and outpatients and health pathways

 

 

 

You can find further information right here.

 

 

gpdu.jpg

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

 

So, as a public service, we’re Here to Help! Bernie Cummins (Director of Nursing Statewide Outpatient Reform) has provided the following documents to help GPs and patients navigate this system and avoid the ‘named referral bounce’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

 

Good luck, and may the odds be ever in your favour!

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Helpful hint to make your GP consultation run smoother #1

Great tips – Dr Raines from Health on Central šŸ‘

rain0021

Symptoms of a urinary tract infection can include needing to pee a lot more than normal (frequency), stinging or burning when you do (dysuria), seeing spots of blood in your urine (haematuria), have belly or lower back pain and having a fever.

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If you arrive early or are waiting for your doctor, please ask to see the clinic nurse to get a clean-catch urine specimen.

It may sound like I am may be telling you to ā€œsuck eggsā€ but if a urine specimen is contaminated by skin cells it the laboratory may report the presence of bacteria there were never in your urine. This may lead to unnecessary use of antibiotics and all its attended problems and cost.

For women
Open the sterile jar and hold it in one hand. Sit on the toilet with your legs wide apart. Use the fingers of your other hand to hold your labiaā€¦

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