Systemic Changes to Improve Quality and Safety in Aged Care

Dr Gaveen Jayarajan has taken the time and effort to write this excellent submission to the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety. I think this is a great start and support it. I have made the following suggestions – and would be very keen to hear more.

 

Key recommendations 1 and 2 are laudable but unfunded (remember aged care panels) – I would suggest the ACAI be retained or these activities count towards the new QI pip payment. 

Key recommendation 5 – I would recommend RACFs adopt an EMR which can accept EMR notes from GP EMRs Sachin B Patel is the man in regard to this

Key recommendation 6 : good idea, would further recommended funding of this via ACAI retention and QI payment

 

 

We can do better and we owe it to our elderly patients to do so. Read on!

 

19 January 2019

 

Doctors in Aged Care Facebook Group Submission to the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety

 

‘Systemic Changes to Improve Quality and Safety’

 

About us

 

The ‘Doctors in Aged Care’ Facebook group was started in September 2017 as a closed Facebook group for all doctors in Australia working in residential aged care facilities (RACFs) or with an interest in aged care. Its purpose is for doctors to discuss, share knowledge and experience, and seek advice about the clinical, administrative and financial aspects of working in aged care.

It has since grown rapidly to 1100 members and includes General Practitioners (GPs), geriatricians, psycho-geriatricians, palliative care physicians and other specialists and junior doctors. Many of these doctors are working at the coalface of aged care on a regular basis and have a unique perspective and insight on the issues faced by RACFs.

Key focus

Our key focus in this submission are systemic changes from a GP perspective that will improve both quality and safety in RACFs. One consistent theme throughout our submission is the need for better oversight, communication between facility nurses and GPs and engagement with family members. While we also support mandated minimum nursing staff ratios with more Registered Nurses (RNs) employed, improved clinical handovers and other issues such as improving dietary quality and options for residents, for the purposes of this submission we will focus on the following five key areas:

 

  1. GP input into the clinical governance of RACFS

  2. GP feedback at accreditation visits

  3. GP involvement in case conferences with families

  4. Uptake of full Electronic Health Records within RACFs

  5. Recognition of significant amount of unpaid work

 

GP input into the clinical governance of RACFs

 

We believe there should be greater GP input in the clinical governance of RACFs given that residents are being admitted at an older age and with more chronic and complex medical conditions. We believe that GP involvement will provide another level of oversight of clinical and care issues that may impact on quality and safety. This is to complement (not replace) existing strong clinical leadership of experienced RNs working within RACFs on a day-to-day basis and to foster a greater understanding and engagement between facility nurses and GPs at a systems level. This at present exists to some degree in Medication Advisory Committee (MAC) meetings held at some RACFs where all issues relating to medication management are discussed within a multidisciplinary team which can include nurses, pharmacists and one or more GPs.

We propose that this either be expanded in scope or a separate committee be created such as a “Clinical Governance Committee” that includes a multidisciplinary team dedicated to open discussion of all clinical governance issues faced by an RACF at a local level. This could consist of nursing staff and carers as well as other healthcare providers such as a physiotherapist, occupational therapist, speech pathologist, dietician, pharmacist and GP. Meetings could be held quarterly and attendance by healthcare providers should be funded by the RACF at a time-based hourly rate commensurate with the providers’ training and experience. Attendance at these meetings could be in person or by phone or videoconference. Outcomes and actions from such a committee should be fed back to the senior management of the broader RACF group for implementation at a local level.

 

KEY RECOMMENDATION 1

Formation of local “Clinical Governance Committees” at each RACF with direct feedback of outcomes and actions to senior management of the RACF.

 

GP feedback at accreditation visits

The current experience of many GPs when a facility is undergoing an accreditation visit by the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency is that feedback is rarely sought from them about their perspective on how the RACF is meeting quality and safety standards. We believe that it should be mandatory for accreditors to get feedback from all visiting GPs to get a broad perspective on all clinical and administrative issues faced by these GPs working at the RACF, and in particular how these issues may be impacting on quality and safety. This could be through either face-to-face or phone contact and should occur at the start of the accreditation period and also when changes have been made to assess any improvements from the GP perspective. We do not believe that GPs need to be paid for this, as most would happily provide constructive feedback if it were likely to improve their experience of providing care and it would ultimately benefit the care of their patients.

KEY RECOMMENDATION 2

Accreditors to obtain feedback from GPs at their visits (initial and follow up).

GP involvement in case conferences with family

Currently GPs are able to bill through Medicare for up to five case conferences per year if clinically indicated with the amounts received dependant on: the duration of the conference; whether the GP organises and participates in the conference;[1] or just participates in a conference that has been organised by someone else.[2]

If the duration of the conference is greater than 40 minutes and it was organised by the GP (ie. item 743) they would receive $201.65 from Medicare plus $6.30 if the patient is eligible for the bulk-billing incentive (item 10990), so $207.95 in total. Hypothetically if this happened 5 times per year this would generate up to $1039.75 in billings per patient per year which is quite substantial. Currently we believe the majority of GPs working in aged are not utilising these item numbers sufficiently and if they did, or if it was easier to do so, it would not only dramatically improve the financial viability of GPs working in aged care, it would also have significant positive impacts on patient safety and quality due to the benefits of having a multidisciplinary team discussing patient care.

We believe it should be mandatory for all new residents of RACFs to have a case conference soon after admission within 6 weeks, and for this to involve nursing staff, a carer, the family and the GP as a minimum, with other allied health staff depending on the clinical and care needs of the resident (and resident attendance optional and depending on their cognitive status). This is an excellent time to set the scene for how the resident’s care is to be managed going forward and also to discuss Advance Care Directives (ACDs) regarding a resident’s end-of-life wishes. These discussions are often not done in a timely fashion or done over the phone with family where there is no remuneration for the GP for this time and work. Ideally this type of case conference should be done annually thereafter and be a focal point for the resident’s annual care plan.

Currently we note that these conferences are done to varying degrees. Some RACFs facilitate conferences as described above, others facilitate conferences with the family but not the GP and others facilitate conferences with two or more facility staff but without the family or the GP. We believe “admission” case conferences and “annual” case conferences should be done with all present to give the maximum benefit to the patient and all healthcare providers providing care to the patient. We also note that case conferences do not require all members to be present in person, so one or more participants may be involved by phone or videoconference, therefore there is flexibility in how these conferences can be scheduled and run.

We note that while GPs can also organise these case conferences with RACFs themselves this requires buy-in to do so from facility staff, thereby making it harder to schedule and arrange.

KEY RECOMMENDATION 3

Mandatory admission case conference for all new residents followed by an annual case conference thereafter utilising existing Medicare item numbers.

Additional case conferences (either organised by the GP or another party) should be based on clinical indication and we believe that GPs should be invited to participate in all of these conferences (assuming they haven’t organised it themselves) with the patient/family consent. Often case conferences are held by RACFs with families with no GP invitation or input. We consider that there is significant benefit to patient safety and care in having the GP involved and engaged with family members in this way. We also note that this is a remunerated way of staying in regular contact with family without resorting to unpaid phone calls, emails or discussions without the patient present thereby again improving the financial viability of GPs working in aged care.

For these “additional” case conferences we believe the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) rules need to be reviewed to make it easier for GPs working in RACFs to utilise these more frequently. Currently three different healthcare providers need to be present at a conference, either in person or via video/teleconference, in order to meet the MBS rules. These healthcare providers can include a GP plus two other different healthcare providers such as a facility nurse and carer and cannot include family members. Firstly, it is not always easy to find the two other different healthcare providers due to everyone’s own day-to-day work commitments. Secondly, we believe most case conferences would benefit from family involvement. Therefore we propose that for these additional case conferences they only require a GP plus one other healthcare provider (not two, but still allow two or more if necessary) plus a family member, so still three different people, but allow the family member to be part of the three.

KEY RECOMMENDATION 4

GP invitation and involvement in additional case conferences held during the year as clinically indicated, with amendment to Medicare item numbers to facilitate increased utilisation.

Uptake of full Electronic Health Records within RACFs

In our experience there are several inefficiencies and risks to the GP and patients associated with RACFs that still have solely or predominantly paper-based patient records. Paper records can be hard to read and take nursing staff longer to enter. Furthermore, only one person can read and enter notes at a time. Clinical information is also often spread across multiple folders separate to the patients record, for example some maybe in the nurses’ station, others in a medication room or at the patient’s bedside. It makes providing adequate oversight much harder to do, which we believe is a major issue in RACFs. It also makes it harder for senior nursing staff, clinical care managers as well other healthcare providers including GPs to monitor clinical issues and care provided to a resident remotely and without being physically where the relevant paper folders are.

We note that there are RACFs who have moved to almost full electronic health records for clinical, care, medication management and administrative functions and the efficiencies this provides and the benefits to improving quality and safety are significant. In particular these benefits are greater if the records are cloud-based, which allows for access from any device and web browser. We also note that other RACFs use a hybrid system where some records are electronic and other aspects remain on a paper-based system. Others remain in a completely paper-based system.

The benefits of full electronic health records are significant, for example the GP can be at the bedside of the patient and pull up all the information they need to make any clinical decision at the point-of-care when they need it the most, without spending time chasing up the various folders in different locations. Any gaps in the information required can be seen instantly with a quick scan of the relevant sections in the electronic record. This can also be fed back to facility nurses to ensure compliance with GP clinical and care directives.

KEY RECOMMENDATION 5

All RACF providers to move to full electronic health records , with a preference for cloud based software, for their residents within 2 years.

Recognition of significant amount of unpaid work

One recurring theme among GPs working in aged care is the vast amounts of unpaid work required. This comes about as GPs usually attend a facility approximately once a week and for the remainder of the week may work in their usual practice. During this time they still need to be on-call and available by phone, fax or email to RACFs to contact them. This work is not remunerated by Medicare and acts as a strong disincentive for GPs who work in a regular practice to continue to care for their patients as they enter an RACF. Examples of unpaid work for GPs working in aged care include: responding to phone calls/emails from/to nursing staff and families, writing prescriptions when off-site, completing letters of capacity, guardianship tribunal forms, Coroner’s reports, taxi vouchers and disabled parking permits, family meetings when the patient is not present, completing Advanced Care Directives (ACDs) when the patient is not present and completing death certificates.

A number of options could be considered to reduce this disincentive. We believe this should initially be focussed on remunerating unpaid phone calls taken directly by GPs from/to facility nursing staff or family members of patients. This will create an incentive for GPs to provide direct access to nursing staff at RACFs to deal with urgent/important clinical issues when they are not on-site and will also enable GPs to engage with family members about their loved ones more frequently. This could be done by phone or videoconference.

RACFs could therefore be a good starting point to introduce more MBS-funded telehealth item numbers. These could be untimed and start with a fixed fee per phone or video call and include a limit on the number of times it can be claimed per day. For example $15 per call with a limit of 5 calls per day. And with no requirement for the patient or other healthcare provider to be directly present at the telehealth consultation, as we note that the current telehealth items are only for a GP to sit in on a consultation between a patient and specialist.

We do recognise there were recent changes to Medicare item numbers for aged care (commencing 1 March 2019) by introducing a $55 call-out fee per visit (applicable to only 1 patient seen during that visit). However we note that at the same time the actual minimum rebate for each consultation was reduced. When the financial impact of this is compared before and after the changes, we view these changes as ineffective. For example if a GP were to see seven patients in a visit, before the changes the GP would generate $286.65 per visit, after the changes they would generate $318.20, so just $31.55 more. In our view this benefit is highly unlikely to encourage more GPs to visit RACFs. Furthermore if a GP were to see say 20 patients in a visit, before the changes the GP would generate $810 per visit, after the changes they would generate $807, so $12 worse off (both calculations exclude the bulk-billing incentive item number 10990 for simplicity). Even if a GP were to marginally benefit from this change due to seeing lower numbers of patients per visit, this benefit is far outweighed by the planned removal of the $5000 Aged Care Service Incentive Payment (SIP) worth up to $5000. So the recent Medicare changes are more likely to see GPs worse off financially (assuming the SIP is removed).

KEY RECOMMENDATION 6

Introduce new Medicare item numbers for GPs visiting RACFs for telehealth consultations directly with facility nurses and family members regarding their patients.

Doctors who supported this submission

Dr Gaveen Jayarajan

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

[1]Medicare Benefits Schedule, Medicare item 735, 730 and 743.

[2] Medicare Benefits Schedule, Medicare item 747, 750 and 758.

 

 

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Discharge summary versus clinical handover: language matters

PartridgeGP is all about professional, comprehensive, and empowering General Practice care by our GPs. When we refer our valued patients for treatment elsewhere we promote the same high standards, values, and communication  that we provide. A letter, referral, or phone call is just part of the standard PartridgeGP service – it’s good clinical handover. Dr Nick Tellis recently collaborated with some excellent GPs in writing an article for the Medical Journal of Australia’s online Insight Blog on ways to improve communication during these times and stressing the importance of better clinical handover. It’s another one of the ways PartridgeGP provides Better Healthcare for our valued patients. Read on.

 

This article is part of a monthly series from members of the GPs Down Under (GPDU) Facebook group, a not-for-profit GP community-led group with over 6000 members, that is based on GP-led learning, peer support and GP advocacy, and was originally published at the Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) Insight Blog here

 

IN our earlier article we described the concept of “passing the baton” when talking about transfers of patient care. All patients come from their communities and to their communities they shall return. In this transition from tertiary hospital to primary care, they benefit from timely, safe, effective clinical handover as defined in the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards.

 

In primary care, communication matters, perhaps more so than in tertiary care. Words matter. The language we use matters. It informs thought at conscious and subconscious levels and influences behaviour.

 

The words “discharge summary” evoke feelings of an administrative process at best, and various unsavoury processes at worst. The accidental discharge, the dishonourable discharge, and the smelly discharge all come to mind. The words “clinical handover” instantly sound more professional. They reflect the sort of interaction between clinicians of which we want to be part. Clinical handover is a term familiar to both clinicians and administrators. It is taught in medical schools around the country and practised between junior and senior doctors within our hospitals.

 

Transition of care is well known to be a time of maximum risk: “Adverse events are seen to increase particularly during a transition of care, when a patient is transferred between units, physicians and teams.

 

Clinical handover is a recognised, evidence-based, structured and essential safety mechanism for minimising this risk. Remember, all patients come from their communities and to their communities they shall return. Their community doctor, their primary care physician, is their GP. Patients deserve the best clinical handover we can provide, whether transitioning into or out of our hospitals.

 

Junior doctors in hospitals presently perform the clear majority of clinical handovers to primary care, labelled as “discharge summaries”. According to the Discharge Summary – Literature Review, published by Queensland Health in May 2017 (not available online):

 

 

“Junior doctors perform the clear majority of discharge summaries:

  • Many interns have a flippant attitude to the completion of discharge summaries and have a low perception on the importance of a safe handover of care;

  • Most medical education programs provide minimal education on the completion of discharge summaries;

  • Most interns learn from each other with little input or guidance from registrars and consultants;

  • Interns tend to ‘lump’ discharge summaries together, often completing the summaries on patients they have never met.”

 

 

This frequently happens after the transition has occurred. To borrow from our legal friends, you cannot sell what you do not own. How then can you transfer the care of a patient you have never cared for?

 

 

Junior doctors report that they have limited supervision and lack templates or guides to help them produce a comprehensive and useful handover for community-based care whereas they receive a considerable amount of training for internal clinical handover.

 

 

Medical practitioners frequently use ISBAR (introduction, situation, background, assessment, recommendation) to guide clinical handover. A recent GPDU discussion highlighted that the Gold Coast University Hospital was moving to an ISBAR format for clinical handover to primary care. This was seen by many in GPDU to be a significant step in the right direction. ISBAR for the clinical handover to primary care aligns with hospital handovers and can only improve the transfer of care. Brewster and Waxman recently proposed amending ISBAR slightly to K-ISBAR by adding some kindness into the equation. Taking the opportunity to actively incorporate empathy and understanding into the primary care handover would be a great place to enhance collegiality across community and hospital teams.

 

 

When deciding who is tasked with a clinical handover within the hospital, it is unlikely that this would be handed to the most junior member of the team, and exceedingly unlikely that it would be delegated to someone who had never treated or met the patient. Within hospitals, it is expected that a clinical handover occurs at or before the time a patient’s care transitions to another team or provider. Why should this be any different for the clinical handover back to the GP?

 

 

In our first InSight+ article, we used the analogy of passing the baton. But what happens when the baton is dropped?

 

 

Dr Mandie Villis recently wrote a heartfelt plea for hospital doctors to inform GPs when patients passed away on their watch. Discussions around primary care clinical handover are now occurring around the country and pockets of significant improvement are being made. Momentum is building in regard to formally recognising and changing the language used from “discharge summary” to “clinical handover”. Several hospital and health services have, or are in, the process of implementing “same day” or “24-hour” clinical handover policies, and ultimately the best practice standard will be that this clinical handover occurs at the time of transition of care.

 

 

My Health Record (MHR) has been touted as a partial solution to the problems that have traditionally plagued clinical handover. It is important, however, to remember what MHR is and what it was created for. It is a repository of information for patients – a “shoebox” of documents akin to the jumble of receipts we burden accountants with at tax time. It is not, nor was it designed to be, a communication tool for clinicians. The baton transfer cannot occur within the MHR shoebox. It was not designed to replace current clinical record systems or current communication channels between clinicians. These limitations and precautions are outlined in the RACGP My Health Record guide for GPs:

 

 

“My Health Record is not designed as a substitute for direct communication between healthcare providers about a patient’s care, and should not be used in this manner. Healthcare providers must continue to communicate directly with other healthcare providers involved in the care of a patient through the usual channels, preferably through secure electronic communication.”

 

 

The  Australian Digital Health Agency states:

 

 

“The My Health Record system supports the collection of Discharge Summary documents. When a healthcare provider creates a Discharge Summary document, it will be sent directly to the nominated primary healthcare provider, as per current practices. A copy may also be sent to the individual’s digital health record.”

 

 

Mission creep of MHR is real, with multiple reports on GPDU of GPs stumbling across clinically relevant information in MHR rather than receiving a timely clinical handover. Important clinical information is “pushed” into MHR and the receiving clinician is not “pulled” to it by any sort of notification. There is no handover without closing the communication loop. Health professionals and organisations must ensure that clinical handover occurs with the intended recipient at the time of care transition. A copy uploaded to MHR for the patient to access, as an archive, may serve as a safety net if all else fails, but should not be relied on as the only source of communication.

 

 

Hospital systems must support and value the safety delivered by effective clinical handover to primary care. This will reduce the readmission rates to hospital care and improve the care patients receive. Patient care and practitioner wellbeing should not continue to be compromised due to the hospital culture of a discharge summary being an administrative task undertaken by the most junior team member. The challenges of high administrative burdens, inadequate staffing and unpaid overtime all need addressing. Junior doctors should not be left alone grappling with piles of outstanding discharge summaries to complete on patients they have never met.

 

 

The patient journey can be tracked, important milestones bookmarked, and plans documented as they are formed so that when it’s time for a transition, the “baton” is ready. The need for handover cannot come as a surprise when the patient’s trajectory was plotted from the day they were admitted. Adequate clinical staffing levels with protected time for clinicians to prepare clinical handovers should be a key performance indicator in hospital care. Proactive strategies must be put in place to identify and document who will be receiving the clinical handover. The culture that prevails within many of our hospitals needs to change.

 

 

Safety and quality bodies, such as the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care through its National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards, and the Australian Council on Healthcare Standards through its accreditation regime, can provide effective oversight. All clinicians must lead in continuous improvement in “best practice” for quality and safety in transition of care both into and out of our hospitals.

 

 

Let us recognise and applaud our hospitals and health services leading the way in acknowledging discharge summaries as the clinical handovers that they are. May 2019 bring us all closer to high quality, timely, safe and patient-centred clinical handovers.

 

 

GPDU dragon head-3

 

clinical handover

 

Dr Katrina McLean is a Gold Coast-based GP, Assistant Professor in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at Bond University, and a GPDU administrator.

 

Dr Michael Rice is past president of the Rural Doctors Association of Queensland, an educator of students and registrars, a long term resident and rural GP in Beaudesert. He’s a keen user of social media.

 

Dr Nick Tellis is passionate about great general practice. He’s a proud GP, beachside Adelaide practice owner, and a happy new father. He blogs at www.partridgegp.com when not administrating on GPDU.

 

Contact Dr Nick Tellis at drnt@partridgegp.com.au or 0882953200 if You are a Great GP and want a Better Place to practice great medicine!

 

 

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Do You Even Aged Care?

Last night on the 730 Report we saw several GPs make the point that fewer GPs are providing care to elderly Australians in Nursing Homes and other Aged Care facilities.

See Here

 

TRACY BOWDEN: Dr Joseph is a strong believer in continuity of care.

DR PETER JOSEPH: For patients, they come in and they don’t have to explain things to you, that happened years ago, because you know it.
You learn what’s going on in the family and how that affects their health.
You can also pick subtle changes.

 

What are the solutions?

Dr Stephen Dick suggests the following:

 

The service is not viable financially and is attached with a burden of being on call 24/7, and having to deal with untrained staff triaging patients who are
quite sick with chronic diseases.

The fix:

1. GPs to operate on a salaried basis to service nursing homes, including a callout fee. The FFS model is broken, utterly, utterly broken, when it comes to aged care.


2. Legislated nurse to patient ratios – both RN to patient and carer to patient ratios.


3. Nursing homes to provide an imprest of basic medications, such as antibiotics and opioids, for after hours issues.


4. Pharmacies to be contracted to provide medications for the residents from a nationally standardised medication chart on a capitated basis – NO MORE OWING SCRIPTS.


5. Get an accreditor with teeth to do spot inspections and severe fines for companies that flout the rules. First offence – $50,000 fine. Second offence – $200,000 fine, resident fees non-payable and the CEO of the responsible corporation placed under house arrest until rectified. Third offence – Home shut down, bonds repaid in full to residents within 30 days, and residents to stay bond-free when and if the facility reopens.I guarantee that if a hospital suddenly had to find 80-odd hospital beds they’d find a solution quick smart.


6. Diets to be individualised and supervised by a dietitian and speech pathologist.


7. Responsibility for the nursing home to provide access to physio, OT, speech, podiatry, optometry in addition to DT.


8. Homes to have a standardised kit out of medical equipment, such as a diagnostic set, ECG machine, local anaesthetic and suture material, biopsy sets, and a room with a printer and wireless access to a network so that we can attend without having to bring every. Little. Piece. of equipment.

 

 

I suggest some simple rules for Aged Care facilities:

 

advice while Dr Nick Tellis is away

 

 

What are your thoughts?

 

Our team – here for You!

Dr Nick Tellis

 

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

dr nick mouktaroudis at Partridge Street General Practice

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

dr gareth boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Abby Mudford

 

dr abby mudford at Partridge Street General Practice3

Dr Chrissy Psevdos

 

dr chrissy psevdos at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Katherine Astill

(on Maternity Leave from August 2018)

 

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

join the team

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GPs want clinical handovers, not discharge summaries

PartridgeGP is all about professional, comprehensive, and empowering General Practice care by our GPs. When we refer our valued patients for treatment elsewhere we promote the same high standards, values, and communication  that we provide. A letter, referral, or phone call is just part of the standard PartridgeGP service – it’s good clinical handover. Dr Nick Tellis recently collaborated with some excellent GPs in writing an article for the Medical Journal of Australia’s online Insight Blog on ways to improve communication during these times and stressing the importance of better clinical handover. It’s another one of the ways PartridgeGP provides Better Healthcare for our valued patients. Read on.

 

This is the third article in a monthly series from members of the GPs Down Under (GPDU) Facebook group, a not-for-profit GP community-led group that is based on GP-led learning, peer support and GP advocacy and was originally published at the Medical Journal of Australia (MJA) Insight Blog here

 

“PASSING the baton” describes what health care professionals try to achieve as care of patients is transferred between providers in our complex health care systems. The topic of safe and effective clinical handover comes up repeatedly in discussions on GPDU.

 

It is apparent that the impacts from delayed or poor clinical handover on patient care across the country are significant, under-reported, and have a profoundly negative effect on the care patients receive.

 

Dropping the baton

 

First-hand accounts of treatment delays, duplication of testing, medication errors, and unplanned readmissions are frequently discussed by GPs. Recent clinical case discussions have included a patient in palliative care being transferred to a hospice on a Friday afternoon with no clinical handover, and a 3-month delay in the completion of a discharge summary for a truck driver who was admitted with a myocardial function.

 

The safety concerns related to poor clinical handover are not new: it’s a problem the health care industry and doctors as a profession have been grappling with for decades. Poor clinical handovers are wasteful of limited resources. How can we improve patient outcomes and “drop the baton” less often?

 

Rules of the game

 

The National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards (NSQHS) and the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care (ACSQHC) define clinical handover as; “the transfer of professional responsibility and accountability for some or all aspects of care for a patient, or group of patients, to another person or professional group”. Appropriate clinical handover is a requirement of the NSQHS. The ACSQHC notes the importance of “transition of care” that “ends only when the patient is received into the next clinical setting”. The Australian Council on Healthcare Standards EQuIP National Standard 12, in particular, specifies the planned provision of transfer information, including results of investigations.

 

Breakdown in the transfer of clinical information has been identified as one of the most important contributing factors in serious adverse events, and is a major preventable cause of patient harm.

 

Why is clinical handover from hospitals to GPs done so inconsistently for patients transitioning from our major private and public institutions? The benefits of passing the baton smoothly are clear. It’s time to coach the team to get it right.

 

Timing is everything

 

Health services continue to debate the appropriate timeframe for communicating with the GP who is continuing the patient’s care. Timeliness of clinical handover is a topic that comes up frequently. Hospital targets for transfer of care communications vary widely. A recent discussion on GPDU identified several targets within one small geographical area, ranging from “at the point of discharge”, “48 hours after discharge” and “5 days after discharge”.

 

GPDU dragon head-3

 

The reality is that few patients leave hospital with an effective clinical handover. Some will be received within the hospital’s current targets; however, many clinical handovers are not received for weeks, months or, as one post highlighted, years after the patient care is transferred. Some never occur.

 

Many GPs are asking whether these targets are consistent, appropriate, acceptable or safe. A robust discussion took place after GPs were approached to complete a survey that included a question asking what conditions should warrant a discharge summary on discharge, and what the acceptable timeframe for receiving a discharge summary should be.

 

The overwhelming consensus was that the gold standard should be clinical handover on discharge for all patients. Many were frustrated that this question even needed to be asked. Some GPDU members wondered whether this was a trick question aimed at moving the goalposts further away from quality patient care.

 

Services promoting clinical handover to GPs on discharge were highlighted. The Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service was identified as a provider that was actively trying to effect positive change. They received plaudits from the wider GP community simply by having a discharge summary management policy specifying complete discharge summaries available at the time of patient discharge.

 

It is well known in GP circles that starting late ensures that you will run late all day. Timely discharge summaries aren’t late. Timing is everything when you want to be a frontrunner.

 

Don’t fumble the handover

 

The consensus among GPs is that well timed, efficient, effective and safe clinical handover, at or before the point of transition of care is essential. Alternative strategies risk adverse outcomes. Clinical handover must be a standardised process between clinicians.

 

Returning to the athletics track, we can see a clear difference between a handover, a throw, and a drop. Highly trained athletes accept nothing less than a smooth handover – nor should highly trained clinicians. Delegating the handover to non-clinicians, including nurses and medical students, is not good enough. Supervision and ongoing coaching of clinicians is vital.

 

The baton is passed between people not machines

 

Imagine the difference electronic systems could make to this smooth handover. Sadly, this smooth electronic handover exists only in the imagination.

 

In the real world, GPs are grappling with being thrown links to hospital electronic records through systems such as “The Viewer”. Investigations are likely to be uploaded (after a delay) to MyHealthRecord. These are raw data, unfiltered and disorganised, and more of a throw than a handover. Being thrown raw data and being expected to catch them in this way is akin to a hospital doctor being given the login to the GP clinic’s patient management system and being expected to extrapolate a referral.

 

Personal bests are set; medals are won

 

The late Sir Roger Bannister ran the 4-minute mile and reset the expectations for all that followed him. GPs and their discussions can highlight outstanding clinical handovers and applaud initiatives and hospitals that are doing it right. Feedback and constructive criticism can be passed back to hospitals that are raising the bar. Medal-winning performances show the possible and provide a model for future improvement. GPs are uniquely placed to spot the talent and report the score widely and rapidly.

 

Eyes on the prize: what’s the next goal?

 

If we can normalise the clinical handover to young GPs who are the future of general practice, it will encourage them to demand it of their hospitals.

 

Hospitals are incredible places, but the aim is for patients to return home to their communities and trusted GPs. They come home. Their GPs are waiting, willing and able. We can do better, and we will. We extend an open hand to our amazing hospitals. Pass us the baton – we won’t drop it.

 

clinical handover

 

Dr Katrina McLean is a Gold Coast-based GP, Assistant Professor in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at Bond University, and a GPDU administrator.

 

Dr Michael Rice is past-president of the Rural Doctors Association of Queensland, an educator of students and registrars, a long term resident and rural GP in Beaudesert. He’s a keen user of social media.

 

Dr Nick Tellis is passionate about great general practice. He’s a proud GP, beachside Adelaide practice owner, and a happy new father. He blogs at www.partridgegp.com when not administrating on GPDU.

 

Contact Dr Nick Tellis at drnt@partridgegp.com.au or 0882953200 if You are a Great GP and want a Better Place to practice great medicine!

 

 

FB_IMG_1549714289275

 

Happy Birthday Partridge Street General Practice!

In 2014, Dr Nick Mouktaroudis and Dr Nick Tellis opened the doors of Partridge Street General Practice at Glenelg!

 

 

 

img_9445

 

 

We’ve gone from strength to strength since then and we’re now well established in our own Health Precinct with Aspire Physiotherapy and Pilates next door.

 

 

 

General Practice and So Much More

 

 

 

The future is bright as we continue to grow! Our Principal GPs :

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

 

Your Specialist In Life

 

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

 

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

 

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We’re providing great General Practice care including:

 

Mental Health Care/Plans

 

Skin Checks and Skin Cancer Care

 

Travel Medicine

 

Immunisations

 

Workcover/Compensable Medicine

 

Emergency Care

 

Antenatal Care

 

Men’s Health and Screening

 

Women’s Health and Screening

 

Babies and Children’s Care

 

Nutrition and Weight Management

 

Executive Health Checks

 

Stop Smoking Help

 

Pathology Services

 

 

AE5A2E0E-AC9E-436F-B33E-13798EC6AEFE

 

 

We’re Here to Help You – in 2017 and beyond.

 

 

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We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

The Last Referral

 

rey offers pen for luke to do a referral
Rey offers a pen to Luke to write a Referral

 

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

 

Dr Mark Raines has written an excellent piece on the role of referrals – I’ve taken some sections and highlighted them below, but you can read the whole piece here.

 

 

In Australia you don’t need a Referral to see a (sub-) Specialist. So, say you wanted to see a Plastic Surgeon about a skin lesion, you can just find a Plastic Surgeon on the internet or ask a friend and make an appointment and off you go. But be prepared for a bill – sometimes a really big bill. This is because, you won’t be able to access a Medicare rebate for the Plastic Surgeon’s fees. To do so you need to first have a valid referral from your GP. But it is not as simple as just calling your GP and asking for a referral.

 

 

 

 

Referrals from a GP are valid for 12 months whereas referrals from one sub-specialist to another are only valid for 3 months (for example when the surgeon that fixes your knee refers to the medical specialist to look after your heart). GPs can also do INDEFINITE referrals – for when you are seeing the same sub-specialist for the same problem for a long period of time (for example when a heart specialist is looking after an ongoing heart problem). Remember though, often your GP can manage your ongoing conditions very well together with your sub-specialist – saving you money and making it more convenient for you!

 

 

 

There are, however, rules!

 

 

 

Backdating Referrals

As a Referral is a legal document, Medicare does not permit backdating a Referral.

A Specialist can see a patient without a valid referral only in an emergency. Apparently, if your dog ate your referral, or another good excuse, there is a exemption available for you to claim your rebate if the Specialist notes that the “Referral is lost”. I am sure that Medicare would get suspicious if this happened a lot. Medicare do audit what GP’s and Specialists get up to make sure the rules are being followed. There are fines for not following the rules!

If you need a Referral make sure you see your GP before seeing the Specialist if you wish to get a Medicare rebate for the service. Asking your GP for a backdated Referral is like asking the Specialist to forward date your consultation so you can get a Referral. Both are not permitted under Medicare.

 

Backdating a referral is stating, in writing, that the doctor saw the patient BEFORE they actually did. Therefore…

 

Seeing a patient on Friday and writing a referral to a sub-specialist dated Monday for a consult that occurred on Tuesday is FRAUD.

 

Seeing a patient on Friday and providing a certificate dated Friday stating that the patient says they were unwell Monday and Tuesday is legally OK.

 

 

Some more rules and regulations.

 

 

 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

 

So when You need a referral – or it’s time to manage Your health more conveniently – You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Dude, where’s my Outpatients?

Hi from South Australia! Summer has come! Our flagship hospital and one of the most expensive buildings in the Southern Hemisphere, the New Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH), came online in September 2017 after a 2 year wait.

 

 

nRAH New Royal Adelaide Hospital

 

 

 

Another big change to the South Australian Hospital System is that the Repatriation General Hospital is gone. Where did the subspeciality clinics go? See below!

 

 

Right Here!

 

arrow down

 

 

 

RGH Clinics – Quick Reference Guide as at November 2017

 

 

 

SALHN Outpatient Clinics Locations and Details

 

 

 

4th Generation Rehab Clinics

 

 

 

 

Bernie Cummins (see below) previously spoke to the Southern Regional GP Council about Outpatients Services in SA and she generously spoke to us again about how things will proceed over the coming months and years.

 

 

 

Here is some information she prepared.

 

 

 

 

royal adelaide hospital and nRAH and outpatients and health pathways

 

 

 

You can find further information right here.

 

 

gpdu.jpg

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

 

So, as a public service, we’re Here to Help! Bernie Cummins (Director of Nursing Statewide Outpatient Reform) has provided the following documents to help GPs and patients navigate this system and avoid the ‘named referral bounce’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

 

Good luck, and may the odds be ever in your favour!

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

The New Royal Adelaide, Ramping Up and Down, and Health Pathways PS: Where did the Repat go?

Hi from South Australia! Winter is here but change is coming. Our flagship hospital and one of the most expensive buildings in the Southern Hemisphere, the New Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH), is about to come online in September after a 2 year wait.

 

 

 

Another big change to the South Australian Hospital System is that the Repatriation General Hospital is gone. Where did the subspeciality clinics go? See below!

 

 

Right Here!

 

arrow down

 

RGH Clinics – Quick Reference Guide as at November 2017

 

 

 

Bernie Cummins (see below) previously spoke to the Southern Regional GP Council about Outpatients Services in SA and she generously spoke to us again about how things will proceed over the coming months and years.

 

 

 

Here is some information she prepared.

 

 

 

royal adelaide hospital and nRAH and outpatients and health pathways

 

 

 

You can find further information right here.

 

 

 

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

 

So, as a public service, we’re Here to Help! Bernie Cummins (Director of Nursing Statewide Outpatient Reform) has provided the following documents to help GPs and patients navigate this system and avoid the ‘named referral bounce’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

 

Good luck, and may the odds be ever in your favour!

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Budget 2017 in Pictures

Politicians are going to politic.

What do GPs have to say about it?

Dr Ewen McPhee on behalf of the RDAA

Dr Bastian Seidel on behalf of the RACGP

 

 

 

 

So, in summary, it’s not great but we’re still Here to Help.

If you have ANY questions – See Your GP!

Our Team can Help You.

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

Dr Nick Tellis

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Ali Waddell

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Emmy Bauer

Named Outpatient Referrals in South Australia

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

So, as a public service, we’re Here to Help! Bernie Cummins (Director of Nursing Statewide Outpatient Reform) has provided the following documents to help GPs and patients navigate this system and avoid the ‘named referral bounce’.

 

 


 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

Good luck, and may the odds be ever in your favour!

 

 

Feel free to email the Southern Regional GP Council for issues with named referrals – we will be happy to relay you concerns to the people and areas where the decisions are made

enquiries@srgpc.com.au

 

 

img_8445-2

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

(Or BE one of our Great GPs right here!)