Happy Birthday Partridge Street General Practice!

In 2014, Dr Nick Mouktaroudis and Dr Nick Tellis opened the doors of Partridge Street General Practice at Glenelg!

 

 

 

img_9445

 

 

We’ve gone from strength to strength since then and we’re now well established in our own Health Precinct with Aspire Physiotherapy and Pilates next door.

 

 

 

General Practice and So Much More

 

 

 

The future is bright as we continue to grow! Our Principal GPs :

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

 

Your Specialist In Life

 

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

 

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

 

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We’re providing great General Practice care including:

 

Mental Health Care/Plans

 

Skin Checks and Skin Cancer Care

 

Travel Medicine

 

Immunisations

 

Workcover/Compensable Medicine

 

Emergency Care

 

Antenatal Care

 

Men’s Health and Screening

 

Women’s Health and Screening

 

Babies and Children’s Care

 

Nutrition and Weight Management

 

Executive Health Checks

 

Stop Smoking Help

 

Pathology Services

 

 

AE5A2E0E-AC9E-436F-B33E-13798EC6AEFE

 

 

We’re Here to Help You – in 2017 and beyond.

 

 

img_4949

 

 

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

The Last Referral

 

rey offers pen for luke to do a referral
Rey offers a pen to Luke to write a Referral

 

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

 

Dr Mark Raines has written an excellent piece on the role of referrals – I’ve taken some sections and highlighted them below, but you can read the whole piece here.

 

 

In Australia you don’t need a Referral to see a (sub-) Specialist. So, say you wanted to see a Plastic Surgeon about a skin lesion, you can just find a Plastic Surgeon on the internet or ask a friend and make an appointment and off you go. But be prepared for a bill – sometimes a really big bill. This is because, you won’t be able to access a Medicare rebate for the Plastic Surgeon’s fees. To do so you need to first have a valid referral from your GP. But it is not as simple as just calling your GP and asking for a referral.

 

 

 

 

Referrals from a GP are valid for 12 months whereas referrals from one sub-specialist to another are only valid for 3 months (for example when the surgeon that fixes your knee refers to the medical specialist to look after your heart). GPs can also do INDEFINITE referrals – for when you are seeing the same sub-specialist for the same problem for a long period of time (for example when a heart specialist is looking after an ongoing heart problem). Remember though, often your GP can manage your ongoing conditions very well together with your sub-specialist – saving you money and making it more convenient for you!

 

 

 

There are, however, rules!

 

 

 

Backdating Referrals

As a Referral is a legal document, Medicare does not permit backdating a Referral.

A Specialist can see a patient without a valid referral only in an emergency. Apparently, if your dog ate your referral, or another good excuse, there is a exemption available for you to claim your rebate if the Specialist notes that the “Referral is lost”. I am sure that Medicare would get suspicious if this happened a lot. Medicare do audit what GP’s and Specialists get up to make sure the rules are being followed. There are fines for not following the rules!

If you need a Referral make sure you see your GP before seeing the Specialist if you wish to get a Medicare rebate for the service. Asking your GP for a backdated Referral is like asking the Specialist to forward date your consultation so you can get a Referral. Both are not permitted under Medicare.

 

 

Some more rules and regulations.

 

 

 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

 

So when You need a referral – or it’s time to manage Your health more conveniently – You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Dude, where’s my Outpatients?

Hi from South Australia! Summer has come! Our flagship hospital and one of the most expensive buildings in the Southern Hemisphere, the New Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH), came online in September 2017 after a 2 year wait.

 

 

nRAH New Royal Adelaide Hospital

 

 

 

Another big change to the South Australian Hospital System is that the Repatriation General Hospital is gone. Where did the subspeciality clinics go? See below!

 

 

Right Here!

 

arrow down

 

 

 

RGH Clinics – Quick Reference Guide as at November 2017

 

 

 

SALHN Outpatient Clinics Locations and Details

 

 

 

4th Generation Rehab Clinics

 

 

 

 

Bernie Cummins (see below) previously spoke to the Southern Regional GP Council about Outpatients Services in SA and she generously spoke to us again about how things will proceed over the coming months and years.

 

 

 

Here is some information she prepared.

 

 

 

 

royal adelaide hospital and nRAH and outpatients and health pathways

 

 

 

You can find further information right here.

 

 

gpdu.jpg

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

 

So, as a public service, we’re Here to Help! Bernie Cummins (Director of Nursing Statewide Outpatient Reform) has provided the following documents to help GPs and patients navigate this system and avoid the ‘named referral bounce’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

 

Good luck, and may the odds be ever in your favour!

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

The New Royal Adelaide, Ramping Up and Down, and Health Pathways PS: Where did the Repat go?

Hi from South Australia! Winter is here but change is coming. Our flagship hospital and one of the most expensive buildings in the Southern Hemisphere, the New Royal Adelaide Hospital (nRAH), is about to come online in September after a 2 year wait.

 

 

 

Another big change to the South Australian Hospital System is that the Repatriation General Hospital is gone. Where did the subspeciality clinics go? See below!

 

 

Right Here!

 

arrow down

 

RGH Clinics – Quick Reference Guide as at November 2017

 

 

 

Bernie Cummins (see below) previously spoke to the Southern Regional GP Council about Outpatients Services in SA and she generously spoke to us again about how things will proceed over the coming months and years.

 

 

 

Here is some information she prepared.

 

 

 

royal adelaide hospital and nRAH and outpatients and health pathways

 

 

 

You can find further information right here.

 

 

 

 

 

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

 

So, as a public service, we’re Here to Help! Bernie Cummins (Director of Nursing Statewide Outpatient Reform) has provided the following documents to help GPs and patients navigate this system and avoid the ‘named referral bounce’.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

 

Good luck, and may the odds be ever in your favour!

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Budget 2017 in Pictures

Politicians are going to politic.

What do GPs have to say about it?

Dr Ewen McPhee on behalf of the RDAA

Dr Bastian Seidel on behalf of the RACGP

 

 

 

 

So, in summary, it’s not great but we’re still Here to Help.

If you have ANY questions – See Your GP!

Our Team can Help You.

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

Dr Nick Tellis

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Ali Waddell

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Emmy Bauer

Named Outpatient Referrals in South Australia

The good GP has a stewardship role in the Australian medical system and part of this is referring to subspecialist and hospital care. This is an important role and we don’t take it lightly. We want to do our best for our patients and help them get the care they deserve. One of the challenges is referring to public hospitals, where our referrals sometimes get ‘bounced’ back to us. In private practice, for the patient to receive a (Federal) Medicare Benefit (like when you see Your GP), the GP referral must be to a named provider (Dr Smith, Dr Jones, for example). When referring to a public hospital, there has historically been no Medicare rebate for the patient – public hospitals are funded by the State Governments and Medicare is funded by the Federal Government, and care is free at the point of service. This is changed recently, and public hospitals are now using Medicare funds to run their services. Therefore they now seek named referrals. But to who? It’s very hard to find out exactly which doctor will be seeing you, and so it’s hard to do a named referral, which may delay you being seen.

 

 

So, as a public service, we’re Here to Help! Bernie Cummins (Director of Nursing Statewide Outpatient Reform) has provided the following documents to help GPs and patients navigate this system and avoid the ‘named referral bounce’.

 

 


 

directive+medicare+billing+outpatients

 

 

 

medicare+directive+and+outpatient+private+practice

 

 

 

Good luck, and may the odds be ever in your favour!

 

 

Feel free to email the Southern Regional GP Council for issues with named referrals – we will be happy to relay you concerns to the people and areas where the decisions are made

enquiries@srgpc.com.au

 

 

img_8445-2

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

(Or BE one of our Great GPs right here!)

Happy Birthday Partridge Street General Practice!

In 2014, Dr Nick Mouktaroudis and Dr Nick Tellis opened the doors of Partridge Street General Practice at Glenelg!

 

 

 

In the Beginning

 

 

 

We’ve gone from strength to strength since then and we’re now well established in our own Health Precinct with Aspire Physiotherapy and Pilates next door.

 

 

 

General Practice and So Much More

 

 

 

The future is bright as we continue to grow! Our Principal GPs :

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

 

Your Specialist In Life

 

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

 

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

 

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We’re providing great General Practice care including:

 

Mental Health Care/Plans

 

Skin Checks and Skin Cancer Care

 

Travel Medicine

 

Immunisations

 

Workcover/Compensable Medicine

 

Emergency Care

 

Antenatal Care

 

Men’s Health and Screening

 

Women’s Health and Screening

 

Babies and Children’s Care

 

Nutrition and Weight Management

 

Executive Health Checks

 

Stop Smoking Help

 

Pathology Services

 

 

Here to Help!

 

 

We’re Here to Help You – in 2017 and beyond.

 

 

 

 

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

Welcoming Dr Ali Waddell to Partridge Street General Practice!

Partridge Street General Practice is very happy to welcome Dr Ali Waddell to Our Team!

 

 

img_5326.jpg

 

 

Dr Ali is one of our two Senior GP Registrars. She completed her undergraduate study at the University of Adelaide and went on to work in rural Victoria completing terms in Obstetrics, Gynaecology, and Emergency. Her experience even includes time in East Arnhem Land in the Northern Territory!

Dr Ali enjoys discussing General and Preventative Health, with a particular focus on Family Medicine, Women’s Health, and Paediatrics. Outside of this, she enjoys relaxing with family and friends and enjoying our beautiful beaches.

 

 

 

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx and our local Medical School at Flinders University.

 

 

 

 

 

This means that the GPs at Partridge Street General Practice are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

 

 

Award Winning Responsibility!

 

 

All of our doctors here at Partridge Street General Practice are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital) or are studying towards these qualifications. This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at Partridge Street General Practice with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

Update: Dr Ali Waddell was a fantastic part of our growing Clinical Team and we appreciated her sharing her General Practice training journey with us. She’s moved on to further training and we wish her well for her exams in 2018. Here’s our team now!

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

 

Welcoming Dr Gareth Boucher to Partridge Street General Practice

 

Partridge Street General Practice is very happy to have Dr Gareth Boucher with us long term.

 

img_0766-3

 

 

Dr Gareth completed his undergraduate medical studies in Auckland and all of his post-graduate training has been in Adelaide. His medical areas of interest include:

 

  • babies and kids (neonates and paediatrics)
  • emergency medicine,
  • chronic disease management
  • palliative care

 

Outside of work Dr Gareth enjoys cycling, skiing, and photography.

 

 

dr-gareth-boucher-cycling

 

He is a GP Palliative Shared Care Provider, as are Dr Tellis and Dr Mouktaroudis. We’ll let Dr Gareth explain this:

 

 

What is palliative care?

Palliative care is holistic care of people with life-limiting illnesses.  Holistic care means we focus on them, not their illness!

Their goals and ambitions

Their mental, physical, and spiritual well-being

Their symptoms

Their dignity

 

We provide care in the community and co-ordinate service providers. We support patients and their families to maintain quality of life and achieve the outcomes important to them.

The Team at Partridge Street General Practice is able to help you and your family with any Palliative Care needs.

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx and our local Medical School at Flinders University.

 


This means that the GPs at Partridge Street General Practice are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

Award Winning Responsibility!

 

 

All of our doctors here at Partridge Street General Practice are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital) or are studying towards these qualifications. This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.
We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at Partridge Street General Practice with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher is a key part of our growing Clinical Team.

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

Driving. Dementia. Decisions. 

General Practice is the greatest vocation there is. Every day GPs are proud to use their skills and training to help their patients have better health and better lives. It’s incredibly rewarding for us and our patients (and the statistics!) show that it’s rewarding full stop.  

Recently, Dr Tim Senior answered the question ‘Do we even need Doctors?‘. He concluded that GPs ‘know what to do when we don’t know what to do. And I can’t think of any other profession we can say that about’. So let’s have a look at a topic where GPs have to make hard decisions when we don’t know what we have to do. 

Big Australia!

Australia has an aging population and Australia is big. Really big! Driving and Australia go together like Vegemite and Toast! What do we do when aging drivers see their GP and we make a diagnosis of Mild Cognitive Impairment or Dementia?

What are the GP’s responsibilities?

Here is the excellent Dr Genevieve Yates with a very personal and professional view on the matter. 

Here is another excellent video from Professor Joe Ibrahim. 

In South Australia we have clear(er) guidelines on Fitness to Drive, with Mandatory Reporting and the associated safeguards for GPs who report patients they believe to be impaired. It’s still a hard decision. For example, just look at Kate Swaffer who has been diagnosed with dementia. What would you do?

Tough Decisions

What would I do? I’m not sure. Every patient is different and that’s one of the reasons why General Practice is, as I said above, the best vocation in the world. GPs will keep learning every day of their professional lives to serve their patients better. My advice to patients is to See Your GP, your best source of information, advice, and support for all of those hard decisions, when you don’t know what to do. 

We’re Here to Help. 

Here to Help

NEW: We can now refer for sub-specialist driving assessments!