Men’s Health Week 2018 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 11-17, 2018 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

 

img_8730

 

GET A GREAT GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

DR NICK TELLIS

Your Specialist In Life

DR NICK MOUKTAROUDIS

DR GARETH BOUCHER

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

DR PENNY MASSY-WESTROPP

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

DR MONIKA MOY

Dr Monika Moy

DR KATHERINE ASTILL

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

#poojogger

June is Men’s Health Month and June 11-17, 2018 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

However, it is also Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – so Men and Women over 50 please see your GP or take advantage of the government screening programs. Those of you under 50 – if you notice a change of bowel habit or unexplained loss of weight – come in and see Your GP!

 

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

 

img_8730

 

GET A GREAT GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

DR NICK TELLIS

Your Specialist In Life

DR NICK MOUKTAROUDIS

DR GARETH BOUCHER

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

DR PENNY MASSY-WESTROPP

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

DR MONIKA MOY

Dr Monika Moy

DR KATHERINE ASTILL

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

Be Super Kind

Doctors are people too. Is this a controversial statement? I’m going to go further and say doctors are people first. I bring this up because some doctors are amazing but they are still only human. There’s a special respect from me for our rural doctors including rural generalist GPs. To me, they are Superhuman! I look at what I do now, and what I used to do as a rural doctor (within 30km of a major Australian city), and, to quote a popular film it’s not the same game. It may not even be the same sport.

 

 

 

I’ll move to some other popular culture. A guilty secret of mine is that I like comics. One series I really liked (and beware this is a NSFW comic and not for children) is Irredeemable. It’s the story of an alien superman (The Plutonian) who becomes a superhero on Earth. He’s super resilent, can fly, has superhuman endurance…you know, those usual rural generalist abilities. The series opens with a family running for their lives. Heat beams target them. Their house is reduced to rubble. Spoiler Alert – they die. Hovering in midair over their bodies is The Plutonian. What happened?

 

 

Screenshot_20180304-173758.png

 

 

Prior to the above events, the Plutonian was doing his thing, saving people. It’s what he did. Day in, day out, with never a day of rest. He stops a nuclear bomb going off in a packed sports stadium. The crowd goes wild. He stands there, letting his adrenaline drop down. One voice comes to his ears amongst the adulation of the crowd.

 

 

‘What a poser’, or words to that effect. Only a few words, only one person, and buried in a sea of praise. But they were enough. They were too much. Superhumans are human too. Perhaps they are human first too? He snaps and flies off.

 

Irredeemable-7-6.jpg

 

I think 14 doctors committed suicide in the last 12 months. I could be wrong about this number. I’m not wrong when I suspect the number that had contemplated suicide was probably much higher. I don’t know the answer but being kind is a good start. Please, be kind. That is all.

 

#bekind

I would love to hear other views on this. We are all professionals or patients or both and we can always improve. Let me know here on the blog (or on our website) – or, if you’re a GP, on the fantastic GPDU FB Group – where GPs are invited to a festival of education and collegiality (#FOAMed – #GPDU18) May 30 – June 1!

 

Get a Great GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

Dr Nick Tellis

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Katherine Astill 1

We look forward to seeing you soon!

3 Free 2018 Fitness Tips from Partridge Street General Practice!

It’s 2018 and many of you will have made your New Year’s resolutions. Many of these resolutions will have been broken by January 15th! We’re past that date, so for those of you who are left, here are some free Fitness Tips to help you carry on and improve your health in 2018.

 

 

Number 3 Fitness Tip from Dr Nick Tellis and Partridge Street General Practice

Get to the Gym…or the Run…or the Swim

 

 

We’ve all had those days where we don’t really want to exercise. Abs may be made in the kitchen but they’re certainly not made in bed. Remove the obstacles. Have your gear out the night before – clothes, trainers, swimmers, headphones – whatever you need to Get It Done. Leap out of bed as the morning alarm sings, get your gear, and Get Out.

 

 

Once you’re at the gym or pool or about to start your run – Start! If you’re not feeling it after 5-10 minutes, stop and head home. That’s cool, it’s not your day. I can assure you following this tip will hugely increase the amount of exercise you do.

 

 

Get a great gym with Anytime Fitness Glenelg, just off Jetty Road, Glenelg!

 

 

dr nick lifting with chris (1)
Younger Fitter Training Partners – the Famous Chris Hooper

Number 2 Fitness Tip from Dr Nick Tellis and Partridge Street General Practice

Don’t be the fittest person

 

 

Here’s the easiest tip here – especially for those of you just starting out. It’s often said that if you’re the smartest person in the room, you need to find a new room. Training with people fitter than you will bring you up with them. Generally people fitter than you have been doing it longer than you have and have built up some great habits and great tips of their own. Let them lift you up!

 

 

My personal take on this is that I train with people younger and fitter than me. I take the opportunity to train with great female athletes – even though I’m nearly double their weight, I can almost keep up! 😎

 

 

Get some great training partners!

 

 

Run with Good Physio or Aspire Pilates and Physiotherapy!

 

 

Lift in the gym and Smash it in business with Sammie Johannes here, here, and here!

 

 

dr nick lifting with sammie
Ms Sammie Johannes – Business Development And Powerlifter

Ms Sammie Johannes – Business Development And Powerlifter

 

 

Number 1 Fitness Tip from Dr Nick Tellis and Partridge Street General Practice

Rack Your &%*%ing Weights!

 

 

You’ve got to the place of exercise and you’ve lifted/run/swam. It’s time. Time to put the little metaphorical cherry on that big beautiful exercise cake. Time for a little ‘accessory exercise’.

 

 

 

 

Rack your &%*%ing weights! Seriously! This is free exercise! You’ll feel better, your training buddies will love you, and your friendly gym owner will sing your praises (and maybe even put your picture up in the gym!). Routine will give you strength and is that extra 1% for you when motivation fails. Routine gets you to the gym. Routine gets your training partners to the gym. And the Routine of racking your weights is worth it’s weight in gold.

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re running or swimming instead of lifting – that’s cool too. Walk more. Walk to and from your run or swim. That incidental movement – briskly, to be truthful – adds up. It adds up to fitness. It adds up to cardiovascular health. It adds up to a little less weight around the middle. It Adds Up!

 

 

Get to Anytime Fitness Glenelg and hit Ryan up…and maybe rack a few weights 😉

 

 

 

 

walking works for dr nick
One Year of Incidental Movement

PS: Here’s a bonus tip

Get a Great GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

Dr Nick Tellis

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Katherine Astill 1

AE5A2E0E-AC9E-436F-B33E-13798EC6AEFE
Weight training – Pumping Iron 😎

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Sore Throats at Partridge Street General Practice

Spring is here but it has been a big flu season at Partridge Street General Practice!

 

 

 

What should you do when you have a cough, cold, or sore throat?

 

Flu-Shot-logo
This may have helped before getting ill…

 

 

Here’s some information:

 

 

Do I have the flu?

 

 

 

Should I be on antibiotics?

 

 

 

My ear is sore?

 

 

 

Should I be immunised?

 

 

 

How do I stay healthier?

 

 

Any other ways to stay healthier?

 

 

Got anything else?

 

 

 

And, of course, What should I do instead?

 

 

There’s a new paper, at the link, saying this:

 

 

 

steroids in sore throat at Partridge Street General Practice

 

 

 

Need more information? Leave a comment or see us in person.

 

 

 

We’re Here to Help!

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Physical Activity and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Then came Nutrition.

Then Smoking.

Now Physical Activity.

 

 

Remember those challenges of life? Men face challenges – we have to be providers, to be strong, to keep our emotions bottled up. Challenges are faced with solutions…or avoided with distractions. Let’s look at a solution. Physical Activity. This is a subject close to my heart and I’ve talked about it a few times before. In fact, you might even say I’ve talked about it a lot.

 

 

nick tellis running melbourne

 

 

What can Your GP do to help you get more physical activity into your life? We can explore specifics in person, but here are the basics.

 

 

Work up to 10,000 steps a day

Do something that makes you sweat for 25-45 minutes, 3-5 times a week

Find a physical activity you enjoy and make it regular

Get together with some like minded active friends

Repeat

 

 

 

Remember, getting physical activity back into your life can be hard, and many people won’t get it right first try. Your GP knows this and won’t give up on you. We can abandon a plan, but we won’t abandon you.

 

Image result for what now

 

So Men, Partridge Street General Practice is going to meet you halfway. We’re reaching out to You and we’re looking forward to you reaching back to us.
We challenge you to get healthier with us. 

  • Stop smoking
  • Cut down drinking
  • Eat better
  • Get more physical activity into your life

We’re going to do it, we’re going to live it, and the team at Partridge Street General Practice are going to run the City to Bay this year for the Childhood Cancer Association

Support them while we support you!

More details soon!

 


See you then or in person if you’d like to talk.




 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Smoking and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Then came Nutrition.

Now Smoking.

 

 

In life we all face challenges. Men face challenges – we have to be providers, to be strong, to keep our emotions bottled up. Challenges are faced with solutions…or avoided with distractions. Smoking is unequivocally a distraction from the challenges of life. Many patients say to me that they smoke because they’re bored or because it’s ‘their time’. Lets try another way. It’s healthier, you’ll live longer, and be fitter. You’ll also have more money, smell better, and be more attractive.

 

 

Image result for good looking non smoker

 

 

What can Your GP do to help you give smoking the boot? We ask you about your smoking, get an idea of how much and when you smoke, and then go into why you smoke. What does it do for you? We can then help by offering some solutions rather than distractions. Counselling, Psychotherapy, Hypnosis, and medications are all options we can explore in person. Remember, smoking is addictive, and many people will not quit for good the first time they try. Your GP knows this and won’t give up on you. We can abandon a plan, but we won’t abandon you.

 

 

 

Ask

Assess

Advise

Assist

Arrange Follow Up

 

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much you smoke (and what you smoke) and why and when you smoke.

 

 

 

File_001

 

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Nutrition and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

 

Next is Nutrition.

 

 

 

 

img_1724

 

 

 

You are what you eat and you just cannot out-exercise a bad diet. I wrote about this a few times before…

here

 

here

 

here

 

and even here!

 

 

What are my tips?

 

 

6f3385db-5d62-4b53-b1e4-0f6078d15ce0

 

 

Smaller Portions

Mindful Eating

No Sugar (including, as far as possible for you, ‘hidden’ sugars)

More Water

Less Alcohol

 

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much food you eat and why and when you eat it.

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Alcohol and Men’s Health Week 2018 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month containing Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up is Alcohol.

 

 

alcohol men

 

drink-driving-statistics-facts alcohol men

 

 

 

Alcohol affects every organ system in the body and contributes (negatively) to pretty much every physical and mental ailment. Have a think about it. Remember the CAGE questions:

 

 

 

Have you ever felt you needed to Cut down on your drinking?

Have people Annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?

Have you ever felt Guilty about drinking?

Have you ever felt you needed a drink first thing in the morning (Eye-opener) to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover?

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much alcohol you drink. Think about why you drink. I’ve even got some thinking music for you.

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440