Here We Are: 5 Stories That Got Us To Now

We live in strange days. Humans have always made sense of their lived experience through stories. Here are some, courtesy of the excellent Morgan Housel (yes, this guy).

Three days after Ronald Reagan was inaugurated in 1981, New York City Council President Carol Bellamy joined a group of speakers at a luncheon to discuss the country’s future.

The group tried to make sense of a world that was hardly recognizable from a generation before.

Familiar? Read on!

Things that make you go hmmm

When it all turns to custard, as they say in New Zealand, one of the safest places on Earth (as I type), your GP is there for you. Your GP is, really, your best insurance.

If you’re a patient, looking for a great GP, PartridgeGP is here to help you, safely and well. You can book a face to face or telehealth consult right here.

If you’re a great GP/Allied Health Professional wanting PartridgeGP to provide you awesome services, facilities, and team so you can serve patients to the best of your ability, contact us here, here, or call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 08 8295 3200.

Stay safe. Use your GP!

Here We Are: 5 Stories That Got Us To Now

We live in strange days. Humans have always made sense of their lived experience through stories. Here are some, courtesy of the excellent Morgan Housel (yes, this guy).

Three days after Ronald Reagan was inaugurated in 1981, New York City Council President Carol Bellamy joined a group of speakers at a luncheon to discuss the country’s future.

The group tried to make sense of a world that was hardly recognizable from a generation before.

Familiar? Read on!

Things that make you go hmmm

When it all turns to custard, as they say in New Zealand, one of the safest places on Earth (as I type), your GP is there for you. Your GP is, really, your best insurance.

If you’re a patient, looking for a great GP, PartridgeGP is here to help you, safely and well. You can book a face to face or telehealth consult right here.

If you’re a great GP/Allied Health Professional wanting PartridgeGP to provide you awesome services, facilities, and team so you can serve patients to the best of your ability, contact us here, here, or call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 08 8295 3200.

Stay safe. Use your GP!

Typhoid Mary and COVID Colin

Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it.

Typhoid Mary was a cook who moved from one rich employer to another in New York and Long Island, infecting seven households with typhoid between 1900 and 1907 before doctors traced her as the common cause of the infections. The key point is that she was in good health herself throughout. When confronted, she indignantly refused to submit stool samples for analysis, until eventually imprisoned for this refusal.

After three years she was released while promising not to work as a cook. Unhappy with the low wages of a laundress, she changed her name, resumed cooking and resumed causing typhoid. After a 1915 outbreak in a hospital for women in which 25 people fell ill and two died, Mary Mallon/Brown was again arrested and kept in quarantine for the rest of her life, refusing to have her gall bladder removed. When she died in 1938, an autopsy revealed a thriving colony of typhoid bacteria in her gall bladder. For some genetic reason they had not caused any symptoms in her.

Clear!

What is the current understanding of the ability to return to work and risk of reinfection/further complications for clinicians who have recovered from COVID-19?
The department will determine when a confirmed case no longer requires to be isolated in hospital or in their own home, in consultation with the treating clinician. This will be actively considered when all of the following criteria are met:
• The patient has been afebrile for the previous 72 hours, and
• At least ten days have elapsed after the onset of the acute illness, and
• There has been a noted improvement in symptoms, and
• A risk assessment has been conducted by the department and deemed no further criteria are needed.
Apparent re-infection has been reported in a small number of cases. However, most of these reports describe patients having tested positive within 7-14 days after apparent recovery. Immunological studies indicate that patients recovering from COVID-19 mount a strong antibody response. It is likely that positive tests soon after recovery represent persisting excretion of viral RNA, and it should be noted that PCR tests cannot distinguish between “live” virus and noninfective RNA.
For further information, go to the department’s website and see Advice for clinicians / epidemiology!

Stay home | Save lives

Now, if you really really must leave home…

Flu Vaccine

Coronavirus 101 | PartridgeGP

The pandemic is here. This is what we can all do:

Watch a short video!

Wash your hands! Soap and water and 20 seconds if you can, alcohol hand sanitiser is second best.

Don’t touch your face! Dr George Forgan-Smith demonstrates in the short video at the link…and goes further with…

Social distancing. Try and stay 1-1.5m away from people. Don’t hug, kiss, shake hands…and DON’T do group meetings / big gatherings. These will soon be cancelled (Monday, if over 500 people) but really, it starts with you!

Dr George demonstrating cough etiquette and social distancing!

Cough into your elbow and clean your phone! Both of these will limit spread of those little virus particles!

Now that you’ve cleaned your phone, and are practicing your social distancing, USE the phone. Telehealth is here via your phone, no special equipment needed.

STAY AT HOME, USE THE PHONE

Great advice if you’re unwell, good advice just for day to day. Call PartridgeGP on 08 82953200 for a phone appointment!

So remember

Wash Your Hands

Wash. Your. Hands.

Don’t Touch Your Face

Social Distancing

Social distancing works

Clean Your Phone

Use Your Phone

Stay Safe and Good Luck!

Some more videos and links below:

What is Your GP trying to do about this?

What about kids and schools?

What about the elderly?

What about my specialist appointment?

Thanks to:

Dr George Forgan-Smith

Dr Todd Cameron

Dr Chien-Wen Liew

Dr Sachin Patel

And please share this to all your friends and family

Men’s Health Week 2019 at PartridgeGP 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 10-16, 2019 is Men’s Health Week at PartridgeGP. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

 

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GET A GREAT GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

 

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IMG_20190601_223800

 

 

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Men’s Health Week 2018 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 11-17, 2018 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

 

img_8730

 

GET A GREAT GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

DR NICK TELLIS

Your Specialist In Life

DR NICK MOUKTAROUDIS

DR GARETH BOUCHER

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

DR PENNY MASSY-WESTROPP

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

DR MONIKA MOY

Dr Monika Moy

DR KATHERINE ASTILL

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

#poojogger

June is Men’s Health Month and June 11-17, 2018 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

However, it is also Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – so Men and Women over 50 please see your GP or take advantage of the government screening programs. Those of you under 50 – if you notice a change of bowel habit or unexplained loss of weight – come in and see Your GP!

 

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

 

img_8730

 

GET A GREAT GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

DR NICK TELLIS

Your Specialist In Life

DR NICK MOUKTAROUDIS

DR GARETH BOUCHER

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

DR PENNY MASSY-WESTROPP

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

DR MONIKA MOY

Dr Monika Moy

DR KATHERINE ASTILL

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

Be Super Kind

Doctors are people too. Is this a controversial statement? I’m going to go further and say doctors are people first. I bring this up because some doctors are amazing but they are still only human. There’s a special respect from me for our rural doctors including rural generalist GPs. To me, they are Superhuman! I look at what I do now, and what I used to do as a rural doctor (within 30km of a major Australian city), and, to quote a popular film it’s not the same game. It may not even be the same sport.

 

 

 

I’ll move to some other popular culture. A guilty secret of mine is that I like comics. One series I really liked (and beware this is a NSFW comic and not for children) is Irredeemable. It’s the story of an alien superman (The Plutonian) who becomes a superhero on Earth. He’s super resilent, can fly, has superhuman endurance…you know, those usual rural generalist abilities. The series opens with a family running for their lives. Heat beams target them. Their house is reduced to rubble. Spoiler Alert – they die. Hovering in midair over their bodies is The Plutonian. What happened?

 

 

Screenshot_20180304-173758.png

 

 

Prior to the above events, the Plutonian was doing his thing, saving people. It’s what he did. Day in, day out, with never a day of rest. He stops a nuclear bomb going off in a packed sports stadium. The crowd goes wild. He stands there, letting his adrenaline drop down. One voice comes to his ears amongst the adulation of the crowd.

 

 

‘What a poser’, or words to that effect. Only a few words, only one person, and buried in a sea of praise. But they were enough. They were too much. Superhumans are human too. Perhaps they are human first too? He snaps and flies off.

 

Irredeemable-7-6.jpg

 

I think 14 doctors committed suicide in the last 12 months. I could be wrong about this number. I’m not wrong when I suspect the number that had contemplated suicide was probably much higher. I don’t know the answer but being kind is a good start. Please, be kind. That is all.

 

#bekind

I would love to hear other views on this. We are all professionals or patients or both and we can always improve. Let me know here on the blog (or on our website) – or, if you’re a GP, on the fantastic GPDU FB Group

 

PS: In the same vein, #besuperkind with the RACGP elections coming up – three GPs have thrown their hats into the ring so far – I wish them all the best of luck, a fair hearing, and look forward to the RACGP elections as a beacon of probity and ethical behaviour rarely seen in our country’s elections.

 

Election info here

Voting info here

Dr Karen Price

Dr Chris Irwin

Dr Ayman Shenouda

 

For Patients – Get a Great GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

Dr Nick Tellis

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Katherine Astill 1

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

3 Free 2018 Fitness Tips from Partridge Street General Practice!

It’s 2018 and many of you will have made your New Year’s resolutions. Many of these resolutions will have been broken by January 15th! We’re past that date, so for those of you who are left, here are some free Fitness Tips to help you carry on and improve your health in 2018.

 

 

Number 3 Fitness Tip from Dr Nick Tellis and Partridge Street General Practice

Get to the Gym…or the Run…or the Swim

 

 

We’ve all had those days where we don’t really want to exercise. Abs may be made in the kitchen but they’re certainly not made in bed. Remove the obstacles. Have your gear out the night before – clothes, trainers, swimmers, headphones – whatever you need to Get It Done. Leap out of bed as the morning alarm sings, get your gear, and Get Out.

 

 

Once you’re at the gym or pool or about to start your run – Start! If you’re not feeling it after 5-10 minutes, stop and head home. That’s cool, it’s not your day. I can assure you following this tip will hugely increase the amount of exercise you do.

 

 

Get a great gym with Anytime Fitness Glenelg, just off Jetty Road, Glenelg!

 

 

dr nick lifting with chris (1)
Younger Fitter Training Partners – the Famous Chris Hooper

Number 2 Fitness Tip from Dr Nick Tellis and Partridge Street General Practice

Don’t be the fittest person

 

 

Here’s the easiest tip here – especially for those of you just starting out. It’s often said that if you’re the smartest person in the room, you need to find a new room. Training with people fitter than you will bring you up with them. Generally people fitter than you have been doing it longer than you have and have built up some great habits and great tips of their own. Let them lift you up!

 

 

My personal take on this is that I train with people younger and fitter than me. I take the opportunity to train with great female athletes – even though I’m nearly double their weight, I can almost keep up! 😎

 

 

Get some great training partners!

 

 

Run with Good Physio or Aspire Pilates and Physiotherapy!

 

 

Lift in the gym and Smash it in business with Sammie Johannes here, here, and here!

 

 

dr nick lifting with sammie
Ms Sammie Johannes – Business Development And Powerlifter

Ms Sammie Johannes – Business Development And Powerlifter

 

 

Number 1 Fitness Tip from Dr Nick Tellis and Partridge Street General Practice

Rack Your &%*%ing Weights!

 

 

You’ve got to the place of exercise and you’ve lifted/run/swam. It’s time. Time to put the little metaphorical cherry on that big beautiful exercise cake. Time for a little ‘accessory exercise’.

 

 

 

 

Rack your &%*%ing weights! Seriously! This is free exercise! You’ll feel better, your training buddies will love you, and your friendly gym owner will sing your praises (and maybe even put your picture up in the gym!). Routine will give you strength and is that extra 1% for you when motivation fails. Routine gets you to the gym. Routine gets your training partners to the gym. And the Routine of racking your weights is worth it’s weight in gold.

 

 

 

 

 

If you’re running or swimming instead of lifting – that’s cool too. Walk more. Walk to and from your run or swim. That incidental movement – briskly, to be truthful – adds up. It adds up to fitness. It adds up to cardiovascular health. It adds up to a little less weight around the middle. It Adds Up!

 

 

Get to Anytime Fitness Glenelg and hit Ryan up…and maybe rack a few weights 😉

 

 

 

 

walking works for dr nick
One Year of Incidental Movement

PS: Here’s a bonus tip

Get a Great GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

Dr Nick Tellis

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Katherine Astill 1

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Weight training – Pumping Iron 😎

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Sore Throats at PartridgeGP

Flu season is here!

 

 

 

What should you do when you have a cough, cold, or sore throat?

 

 

Flu-Shot-logo
This may have helped before getting ill…

 

 

Here’s some information:

 

 

Do I have the flu?

 

 

 

Should I be on antibiotics?

 

 

 

My ear is sore?

 

 

 

Should I be immunised?

 

 

 

How do I stay healthier?

 

 

Any other ways to stay healthier?

 

 

Got anything else?

 

 

 

And, of course, What should I do instead?

 

 

There’s a new paper, at the link, saying this:

 

 

 

steroids in sore throat at Partridge Street General Practice

 

 

 

Need more information? Leave a comment or see us in person.

 

 

 

We’re Here to Help!

 

 

 

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You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis