Divided, the Empire must unite…

Romance of the Three Kingdoms is
one of China’s four Great Classical Novels. The title of this blog post is more fully:

The empire, long divided, must unite; long united, must divide. Thus it has ever been.

PartridgeGP is based on a triple promise that we will be great for our patients and our community, GPs and our staff, and for the owners and the practice. Further, we will provide a comprehensive, professional, empowering, and sustainable service at all times.

Our friendly neighbourhood pharmacist sent this to me (see below). He was a little worried about the threat to his full service pharmacy and also to great General Practice.

Hmmmm

Now different companies will have different service offerings at different levels of the market. Think Porsche and Hyundai. Both very acceptable to different groups. Maybe even acceptable to the same group at different times. I’m not sure they are competitors.

I put my thoughts down here:

Upon reflection…

So keep playing to your strengths, keep doing your best, and unite not divide.

If you want to join a team that’s here to guide and help our valued patients, give Dr Nick Tellis or Dr Nick Mouktaroudis a call at PartridgeGP on 8295 3200!

Welcoming Dr Zoe Teh to PartridgeGP

PartridgeGP is proud to welcome Dr Zoe Teh to our team!

 

dr zoe teh

 

Dr Zoe completed her undergraduate medical training at the University of Adelaide, and spent her intern and resident years between the Royal Adelaide Hospital and Queen Elizabeth Hospital. She undertook her General Practice training in a number of clinics across southern Adelaide, and is particularly interested in sexual health, women’s health (including Implanon insertion and removal), and preventative medicine. She is also fluent in Mandarin!

 

 

We welcome Dr Zoe to Our Team here at PartridgeGP to be Your GP!

 

 

She is available to help you with all of your General Practice needs from April 2020 and you can book your appointment with her conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 0882953200.

 

screenshot_20200330-194411_wm816164613062801551.png

 

 

All of our doctors here at PartridgeGP are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.

 

 

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at PartridgeGP with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

IMG_20190321_202633

 

DR PENNY MASSY-WESTROPP

dr penny massy westropp - your gp

DR MONIKA MOY

dr monika moy- your gp

Dr Zoe Teh

dr zoe teh

 

Welcoming Dr Nikhil Tamminedi to PartridgeGP

 

 

 

Dr Nikhil Tamminedi commenced his specialist General Practice training with PartridgeGP in February 2020. He completed his undergraduate medical training at the University of Western Sydney. Prior to commencing General Practice training, Dr Tamminedi worked two Post Graduate years in metropolitan hospitals in New South Wales with a focus on surgical disciplines and emergency medicine. His particular interest include skin, minor surgery, and respiratory medicine. In his free time, he enjoys rock climbing, hiking, and travelling..

Dr Nikhil has quickly settled in and has hit the ground running with the rest of our Great Team here at PartridgeGP!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PartridgeGP is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx.

 

 

 

This means that the GPs at PartridgeGP are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

 

img_1954
Teaching Practice of the Year

 

 

All of our doctors here at PartridgeGP are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.

 

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at PartridgeGP with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

 

Dr Nikhil Tamminedi is a valuable member of our growing Clinical Team!

 

 

 

 

IMG_20190404_191100

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Zoe Teh

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Nici Williams

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Phillip Maddocks

 

Dr Nikhil Tamminedi

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

Welcoming Dr Phillip Maddocks to PartridgeGP

 

 

 

Dr Phillip Maddocks commenced his specialist General Practice training with PartridgeGP in February 2020. Raised in Adelaide, he studied and practiced in NSW, and then returned to Adelaide earlier this year. Becoming an accomplished GP has always been his career goal and he is eager to commence community-based work. I’m passionate about paediatrics, emergency medicine, sports medicine, and teaching. Prior to my career in medicine I held numerous leadership positions across both business and sport, attaining many skills which are transferable to working in medical teams.

Dr Phil has quickly settled in and has hit the ground running with the rest of our Great Team here at PartridgeGP!

 

screenshot_20200330-194411_wm816164613062801551.png

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PartridgeGP is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx.

 

 

 

This means that the GPs at PartridgeGP are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

 

img_1954
Teaching Practice of the Year

 

 

All of our doctors here at PartridgeGP are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.

 

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at PartridgeGP with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

 

Dr Phillip Maddocks is a valuable member of our growing Clinical Team!

 

 

 

 

IMG_20190404_191100

 

 

 

 

 

Dr Zoe Teh

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Nici Williams

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Phillip Maddocks

 

Dr Nikhil Tamminedi

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

Electronic Prescribing at PartridgeGP

You bet!

Those bits of paper your GP gives you to get medications from your Pharmacist are changing. Scripts are now DIGITAL!

GPs can now send prescriptions to pharmacists electronically as an interim solution during the pandemic. 

As part of the COVID-19 National Health Plan telehealth model, the new interim measure allows GPs to send prescriptions electronically to pharmacists without having to mail out a physical copy of the original paper prescription with a GP’s wet-ink signature.

Patients can then have their script filled and medication delivered to their door, helping to minimise the risk of virus transmission in accordance with social-distancing measures.

‘It’s certainly going to make it easier for practices, because they are being inundated with pharmacists asking them to post prescriptions to them,’
 
‘I know at my practices it’s causing substantial concern.
 
‘We’re getting calls every day from pharmacists saying, “I can’t dispense unless you send me the hardcopy paper”, and we’re saying, “We don’t have the resources to keep running out and buying stamps, and it’s just not safe to put staff in that position”.
 
‘So we’ve had a bit of a stalemate for the last few weeks and this is a great outcome in the short term.’

Dr Nathan Pinksier – GP

As outlined in guidelines issued by the Department of Health (DoH), GPs will be required to do as follows:

  1. Create a paper prescription during a telehealth consultation. This will need to be signed as normal or using a valid digital signature
  2. Create a clear copy of the entire prescription (a digital image such as a photo or PDF including the barcode where applicable)
  3. Send via email, fax or text message directly to the patient’s pharmacy of choice

Schedule 8 and 4(D) medicines such as opioids and fentanyl are not part of the interim arrangement.

While not legally required, the DoH encourages practices that are able to continue sending the original script to pharmacies to do so as soon as possible. All other practices must retain the paper prescription for a period of up to two years for audit and compliance purposes.

Yes!

This is a great step forwards!

Electronic Prescriptions

Changes have been made to Commonwealth legislation to recognise an electronic prescription as a legal form to allow medicine supply. This provides prescribers and patients with an alternative to paper prescriptions. Paper prescriptions will still be available.

Electronic prescribing will not fundamentally change existing prescribing and dispensing processes. It provides patients with greater choice and patients can still choose which pharmacy they attend to fill their prescription.

Under the Australian Government’s National Health Plan for COVID-19, electronic prescriptions are now being fast-tracked to support telehealth and allow patients to receive vital healthcare services while maintaining physical distancing and, where necessary, isolation.

A significant amount of work has already been done to ensure that necessary upgrades to both pharmacy and prescriber software can be done quickly and electronic prescriptions are expected to be available from the end of May.

Electronic prescriptions are an alternative to paper prescriptions which will allow people convenient access to their medicines and will lessen the risk of infection being spread in general practice waiting rooms and at community pharmacies.

Quick links

Information for prescribers 

Information for dispensers

Tokens

The solution being fast-tracked will see a unique QR barcode known as a “token” sent via an app (if you have one), SMS or email. The token will be sent to you from your doctor, which is then presented or sent to a pharmacy, to supply your medication.

The token will be scanned by your pharmacist as a key to unlock the electronic prescription from an encrypted and secure electronic prescription delivery service.

If you have any repeats of a prescription, a new token will be sent to you when the prescription is dispensed. You will need to keep the token to send to your pharmacy when you need to get the repeat filled.

Active Script List

By the end of this year, more functionality will be available and in addition to the token, there will also be an option for your pharmacy to have a list of your active prescriptions in their software, so you don’t have to forward it on.

To get your medicines you will need to prove your identity to the pharmacist and provide consent for the pharmacist to view your prescriptions.

Steps to take in preparation for using an electronic prescription

  • Ensure your address, email address and mobile number are up to date with your doctor and pharmacy.
  • Check that your pharmacy can take an electronic prescription and are delivering medicines.

Your GP at PartridgeGP

Your Pharmacist at Bayside Village Pharmacy

Typhoid Mary and COVID Colin

Those who don’t know history are doomed to repeat it.

Typhoid Mary was a cook who moved from one rich employer to another in New York and Long Island, infecting seven households with typhoid between 1900 and 1907 before doctors traced her as the common cause of the infections. The key point is that she was in good health herself throughout. When confronted, she indignantly refused to submit stool samples for analysis, until eventually imprisoned for this refusal.

After three years she was released while promising not to work as a cook. Unhappy with the low wages of a laundress, she changed her name, resumed cooking and resumed causing typhoid. After a 1915 outbreak in a hospital for women in which 25 people fell ill and two died, Mary Mallon/Brown was again arrested and kept in quarantine for the rest of her life, refusing to have her gall bladder removed. When she died in 1938, an autopsy revealed a thriving colony of typhoid bacteria in her gall bladder. For some genetic reason they had not caused any symptoms in her.

Clear!

What is the current understanding of the ability to return to work and risk of reinfection/further complications for clinicians who have recovered from COVID-19?
The department will determine when a confirmed case no longer requires to be isolated in hospital or in their own home, in consultation with the treating clinician. This will be actively considered when all of the following criteria are met:
• The patient has been afebrile for the previous 72 hours, and
• At least ten days have elapsed after the onset of the acute illness, and
• There has been a noted improvement in symptoms, and
• A risk assessment has been conducted by the department and deemed no further criteria are needed.
Apparent re-infection has been reported in a small number of cases. However, most of these reports describe patients having tested positive within 7-14 days after apparent recovery. Immunological studies indicate that patients recovering from COVID-19 mount a strong antibody response. It is likely that positive tests soon after recovery represent persisting excretion of viral RNA, and it should be noted that PCR tests cannot distinguish between “live” virus and noninfective RNA.
For further information, go to the department’s website and see Advice for clinicians / epidemiology!

Stay home | Save lives

Now, if you really really must leave home…

Flu Vaccine

Aged care royal commission continues in Canberra with focus on health care services, GP-patient relationships

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-09/aged-care-royal-commission-continues-in-canberra/11777870

PartridgeGP and Dr Nick Tellis are proud to serve our older Australians in Residential Aged Care Facilities. It’s something we will do more of in 2020 – and we will do better 👍🏼

See our thoughts here:

Some ideas for improvement 🤔

Some more ideas for improvement 🤔

Book yourself or your relatives in an RACF in for an appointment by calling 82953200

And access our new patients in RACF forms right here


Resourcing, not medication restrictions, needed in aged care

Thanks to Dr Michael Clements and NewsGP from the RACGP for highlighting the needs for aged care 👍🏼

Dr Michael Clements


9/12/2019 3:14:11 PM

The Government’s recent funding injection has to be specifically targeted to address the problems GPs, staff and patients face within residential aged care facilities, Dr Michael Clements writes.

Aged care
Dr Michael Clements believes that while aged care requires a significant funding boost, it will only be helpful if it is specifically targeted to the sector’s needs.

‘Mrs X was found wandering at night in the carpark, can you please prescribe medication?’
 
This was how one recent residential aged care facility (RACF) interaction began for me.
 
After meeting with the staff and ruling out delirium or biochemical causes, and noting a worsening in the behavioural aspects of dementia, I suggested the patient move to the restricted ward or have extra supervision.
 
But my request was declined due to lack of beds and I was specifically asked, once again, to commence a medication to prevent the patient from wandering.
 
The situation was clear: under-staffing in this facility led to pressure to prescribe sedative medications that would keep the patient compliant and allow staff to attend to other residents.
 
Provision of care within RACFs has become more complex and time-consuming as the population ages and rates of dementia rise. Unfortunately, funding models have not kept pace, even as clinical governance requirements in RACFs have increased and nurse autonomy reduced.
 
This has led to a situation for many GPs who work within RACFs in which countless night-time phone calls, form-signing, box-ticking and compliance measures now form the largest part of their care. It has also led to an overreliance on anti-psychotic medications for the behavioural aspects of dementia, as understaffed facilities come under pressure to medicate their problems away.
 
GPs have been looking forward to the Royal Commission into Aged Care, Quality and Safety because they, along with RACF staff, have seen cost-cutting measures applied in facilities, with reductions in numbers of trained staff, greater reliance on lower-skilled assistants, and decreased activities and programs.
 
Staff across the aged care sector want to see better diversionary activities and care services, nursing numbers, and funding to allow GPs to spend more time with patients and their families. This is felt most acutely in rural and regional areas, which are already experiencing aged care staff and GP workforce shortages.
 
The Federal Government has suggested high prescriptions of anti-psychotic medications in RACFs is a source of the problem, rather than an indicator of a system that is under-resourced to deal with the complex issues of dementia care.
 
However, the latest promise of extra funding from the Federal Government does nothing to address the reasons behind the increased use of anti-psychotic medications for the behavioural aspects of dementia; it is simply ‘shooting the canary’ and will have no impact on the gas leak in the coalmine the canary has been screaming about for the last five years.
 
What RACFs need instead is funding targeted towards sufficient numbers of appropriately trained nursing staff, for GPs to provide comprehensive team-based care, and for tertiary services to get out of hospital grounds and into RACFs to work with GPs.
 
Novel solutions are required to the problems faced in residential aged care, and each facility will need to find one that reflects their community workforce and need.
 
But some general steps that will be helpful across the board include:

  • additional money injected into the system from federal and state health budgets
  • patients getting used to private fees for GP services
  • nurses and nurse practitioners being allowed to practice at their full scope
  • GP-led rather than GP-delivered care being utilised where possible.

The message should be clear: fund RACFs and GPs in order to enable them to provide the care that is so desperately needed.

Do not shoot the canary.

© 2018 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) ABN 34 000 223 807

PartridgeGP and Dr Nick Tellis are doing our best for better aged care in many of our local aged care facilities. We will do more in 2020! Watch this space 👍🏼

Secrets Healthy Men know with PartridgeGP and Coles

Tim Ferriss asked a question in his book Tribe of Mentors.

 

 

‘If you could put a message on a billboard, to be seen by millions (or billions) of people, what would you say?’

 

 

I was lucky enough to have an opportunity to answer this in real life when a journalist from Coles contacted me. They wanted to know a GPs views on Men’s Health. The article we produced is here (and reproduced below). This is in the Coles Health and Beauty magazine – they have printed 500,000 copies of this! What was that one message I wanted to get across?

 

 

dr nick tellis coles health and beauty the money quote
The Message!

 

 

 

 

Our practice, PartridgeGP, our GPs, and the rest of our team are here for you. No billboards needed – just book in for an appointment 😎

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20190404_191100

 

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The Road to being a GP with PartridgeGP

Just check out this picture of what someone goes through to become a GP. Wow!

(thanks to Dr Jared Dart for finding this)

 

 

How do doctors get to be doctors.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

PartridgeGP is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx.

 

 

 

This means that the GPs at PartridgeGP are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

 

img_1954
Teaching Practice of the Year

 

 

All of our doctors here at PartridgeGP are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.

 

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at PartridgeGP with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

 

Some of our recent GP registrars

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Clare Mackillop

 

 

 

 

IMG_20190404_191100

 

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Nici Williams

 

Dr David Hooper

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Clare Mackillop

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Jen Becker

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis