I like steak

I like steak. It tastes good, it looks good, and I think it is good for you (like everything, everything in moderation). My preferred steak is grass fed, thickly cut, with a generous fat content, well marbled, and cooked with love, care, and attention. Cattle are meant to graze on pasture, not corn, and not soy. I am listed on Low Carb Down Under and am very happy to give medical advice on medical issues to do with Low Carb, Healthy Fat (LCHF) eating and diet. You can read some of my previous posts on this here, here, and here.

I wrote earlier this week about the theory of maximum taste, where our minds are defined by their upper limits; the best content they are used to consuming regularly. Whether it is the content you read, the food you eat, or the company you keep, better quality improves you and your life. To this end, I like to source good quality steak. This requires time, effort, energy, and investment. I know my local butchers well. They know me. They will often have exactly what I want (sometimes knowing what I want better than I do) and will have it packaged up for me and ready to go in far less time than others would. This is very valuable to me. I liken this to the service we provide at PartridgeGP – high quality, relational, and proactive. We add value.

Now, all this service and value comes at a cost. My local butcher is a little bit more expensive than my local supermarket. They don’t open from dawn until midnight. They don’t open on a Sunday, or even late on a Saturday afternoon. I have to plan ahead; if I don’t organise myself during opening hours, I sometimes find myself steakless. Thankfully, there is a solution to this with my local supermarket being open for the vast majority of the week. They always have steak and I can grab some whenever. It’s cheaper, it’s generally not grass fed, or well marbled, or thick, and usually has supermodel amounts of fat. I am very grateful that my local supermarket exists. They provide a different level of service and value. I shop there far less often than at my local butcher but convenience is a virtue all of it’s own. I liken this to the value proposition from some other medical providers.

Just like with your food, your reading, and the company you keep, pick your medical care mindfully in 2021, and invest that time, effort and energy into your health. You can make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Where to from here?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Body Shaming

We all know that COVID19 is around. Luckily in SA we have stuck to

Social Distancing
Hand Washing
Cough Etiquette

And so we have the following stats!

July 8 – well done so far SA

But those extra pounds and kilos have snuck in where even COVID19 hasn’t reached. PartridgeGP is here to help and therefore we posted this on our Facebook page:

Facebook – 13 July

The text was as follows:

Has a little isoweight crept on, even before the #secondwave ?
@partridgegp has you covered! 👍🏼

> diet and exercise help
> physiotherapy to keep you moving
> medication advice

Movement Theory

Rod Ventura providing awesome #physiotherapy and all of our GPs below

Call 8295 3200 or http://bit.ly/2XmM0n5

Dr Monika Moy
Dr Penny Massy-Westropp
Dr Nikhil Tamminedi
Dr Zoe Teh
Dr Nick Mouktaroudis
Dr Phil Maddocks
Dr Gareth Boucher
Dr Nick Tellis

HIT THE BIG BLUE BUTTON!

We’re here to serve you during this difficult time as we always have
To make a phone appointment click here http://bit.ly/2XmM0n5 or call us on 8295 3200

So we tried to boost this post, but Facebook said no. It was body shaming!!! Well, we shall post here and see what you think. Leave your messages in the comments!

To be or not to be?

PartridgeGP and Dr Nick Tellis are Here to Help – here are three ways we can do this:

1. You’re a patient and you want a Great GP! Make a booking online for Dr Nick or one of the caring GPs at PartridgeGP by clicking right here!

2. You’re a great GP or Allied Health Professional and you want a practice that will provide you with the awesome services, facilities, and team so you can serve patients to the best of your ability. Say hi Dr Nick Tellis (Facebook) or LinkedIn or call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 08 8295 3200

3. You’re a small business owner looking to network and grow your amazing business. Touch base with Dr Nick Tellis (Facebook) or LinkedIn and we will share a socially distanced coffee (or three)!

Men’s Health Week 2019 at PartridgeGP 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 10-16, 2019 is Men’s Health Week at PartridgeGP. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

 

img_8730

 

GET A GREAT GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

 

IMG_20190314_003620_064

 

20190217_030535_0000

 

 

IMG_20190601_223800

 

 

IMG_20190404_191100

Men’s Health Week 2018 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 11-17, 2018 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

 

img_8730

 

GET A GREAT GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

DR NICK TELLIS

Your Specialist In Life

DR NICK MOUKTAROUDIS

DR GARETH BOUCHER

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

DR PENNY MASSY-WESTROPP

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

DR MONIKA MOY

Dr Monika Moy

DR KATHERINE ASTILL

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

#poojogger

June is Men’s Health Month and June 11-17, 2018 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

However, it is also Bowel Cancer Awareness Month – so Men and Women over 50 please see your GP or take advantage of the government screening programs. Those of you under 50 – if you notice a change of bowel habit or unexplained loss of weight – come in and see Your GP!

 

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

 

img_8730

 

GET A GREAT GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

DR NICK TELLIS

Your Specialist In Life

DR NICK MOUKTAROUDIS

DR GARETH BOUCHER

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

DR PENNY MASSY-WESTROPP

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

DR MONIKA MOY

Dr Monika Moy

DR KATHERINE ASTILL

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

We look forward to seeing you soon!

 

 

 

Physical Activity and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Then came Nutrition.

Then Smoking.

Now Physical Activity.

 

 

Remember those challenges of life? Men face challenges – we have to be providers, to be strong, to keep our emotions bottled up. Challenges are faced with solutions…or avoided with distractions. Let’s look at a solution. Physical Activity. This is a subject close to my heart and I’ve talked about it a few times before. In fact, you might even say I’ve talked about it a lot.

 

 

nick tellis running melbourne

 

 

What can Your GP do to help you get more physical activity into your life? We can explore specifics in person, but here are the basics.

 

 

Work up to 10,000 steps a day

Do something that makes you sweat for 25-45 minutes, 3-5 times a week

Find a physical activity you enjoy and make it regular

Get together with some like minded active friends

Repeat

 

 

 

Remember, getting physical activity back into your life can be hard, and many people won’t get it right first try. Your GP knows this and won’t give up on you. We can abandon a plan, but we won’t abandon you.

 

Image result for what now

 

So Men, Partridge Street General Practice is going to meet you halfway. We’re reaching out to You and we’re looking forward to you reaching back to us.
We challenge you to get healthier with us. 

  • Stop smoking
  • Cut down drinking
  • Eat better
  • Get more physical activity into your life

We’re going to do it, we’re going to live it, and the team at Partridge Street General Practice are going to run the City to Bay this year for the Childhood Cancer Association

Support them while we support you!

More details soon!

 


See you then or in person if you’d like to talk.




 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Smoking and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Then came Nutrition.

Now Smoking.

 

 

In life we all face challenges. Men face challenges – we have to be providers, to be strong, to keep our emotions bottled up. Challenges are faced with solutions…or avoided with distractions. Smoking is unequivocally a distraction from the challenges of life. Many patients say to me that they smoke because they’re bored or because it’s ‘their time’. Lets try another way. It’s healthier, you’ll live longer, and be fitter. You’ll also have more money, smell better, and be more attractive.

 

 

Image result for good looking non smoker

 

 

What can Your GP do to help you give smoking the boot? We ask you about your smoking, get an idea of how much and when you smoke, and then go into why you smoke. What does it do for you? We can then help by offering some solutions rather than distractions. Counselling, Psychotherapy, Hypnosis, and medications are all options we can explore in person. Remember, smoking is addictive, and many people will not quit for good the first time they try. Your GP knows this and won’t give up on you. We can abandon a plan, but we won’t abandon you.

 

 

 

Ask

Assess

Advise

Assist

Arrange Follow Up

 

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much you smoke (and what you smoke) and why and when you smoke.

 

 

 

File_001

 

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Nutrition and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

 

Next is Nutrition.

 

 

 

 

img_1724

 

 

 

You are what you eat and you just cannot out-exercise a bad diet. I wrote about this a few times before…

here

 

here

 

here

 

and even here!

 

 

What are my tips?

 

 

6f3385db-5d62-4b53-b1e4-0f6078d15ce0

 

 

Smaller Portions

Mindful Eating

No Sugar (including, as far as possible for you, ‘hidden’ sugars)

More Water

Less Alcohol

 

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much food you eat and why and when you eat it.

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Alcohol and Men’s Health Week 2018 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month containing Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up is Alcohol.

 

 

alcohol men

 

drink-driving-statistics-facts alcohol men

 

 

 

Alcohol affects every organ system in the body and contributes (negatively) to pretty much every physical and mental ailment. Have a think about it. Remember the CAGE questions:

 

 

 

Have you ever felt you needed to Cut down on your drinking?

Have people Annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?

Have you ever felt Guilty about drinking?

Have you ever felt you needed a drink first thing in the morning (Eye-opener) to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover?

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much alcohol you drink. Think about why you drink. I’ve even got some thinking music for you.

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?
 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol
 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440