The Evidence For Sugar

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How do we get to the left side of this image rather than the right?

 

Probably not with sugar!

 

See the evidence – and read more here

 

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You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

Five People Who Need To See Their GP (But May Not Realise It)

The Runner

 

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Whether you’re already an experienced runner or a complete novice, setting goals — like running a half marathon — can provide the motivation to lace-up those runners each day. But when you’re tackling longer distances and putting your body under more strain than usual, it’s worth keeping in mind that checking in with your GP can ensure you reach the finish line injury free. “A GP might say, ‘let’s have a look at you, what’s your height and weight? Is your time frame realistic?” says Dr Tellis. “They might advise you to look out for shin splints, or what to do if you’re experiencing shortness of breath or chest pains.” And let’s be real, we’re not all just born with a runner’s physique. So if you are concerned about getting in better shape for the big race, it’s worth raising with your doctor. “For a half-marathon, we’d also be advising what you should be eating and drinking and how many calories you should be consuming on a daily basis,” Dr Tellis says.

 

 

The Soon-To-Be Traveller

 

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Whether you’re planning a tour of Europe, a week partying in Bali or a volunteering trip to Africa, your GP can offer you a wealth of advice. That includes options for travel vaccinations, food safety measures to take abroad, and what to include in your first-aid kit. “I also recommend to everyone get the best travel insurance they can afford and to take a close look at the exclusions in there,” says Dr Tellis. “For example, if you go to Bali and get on a scooter after drinking beers, you may not be covered by travel insurance — the cost of medical repatriation from Bali to Australia could be as high as six figures.”

 

 

 

The Couple Planning A Family

 

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You don’t need to wait until you fall pregnant for a trip to the GP — their advice can assist all couples with a healthy conception and pregnancy, by looking at your lifestyle and what might need changing from diet, to sleep, smoking, alcohol and drug consumption. “For women, you want to be taking vitamins with the right amount of folate. You want to be making sure your cervical screening (the new term for the old pap smear test), dental checks and rubella vaccination is up to date and that you’ve had your flu shot,” says Dr Tellis. “For guys, you want to be sure you’re not smoking dope or drinking too much, you want to be looking after your weight and your partner as well.”

 

 

The Exhausted Gym Rat/Bunny

 

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What happens when you think you’re healthy — and hitting the gym regularly — but still feeling exhausted or in pain? A trip to the GP can help pinpoint the cause, and advise on how you can change your training regimen to avoid injury. “A lot of men will hit the gym and do things likely to cause an injury or problem down the track… or they’ll find that big guy at the gym who has some interesting pharmaceuticals of his own. Again, that’s something we can give advice on,” says Dr. Tellis. Meanwhile, women may be suffering from undiagnosed mineral deficiencies, leading to tiredness. “A lot of women can be iron deficient,” explains Dr Tellis, who says he’d ask: “How much sleep are you getting, what are you doing in the gym, is it sustainable to be working 50 hours a week and getting up at 5am daily for Crossfit? Is your thyroid okay, are you getting enough calories in?”

 

 

The Stressed Out Comfort Eater

 

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When you’re working long hours and feeling stressed, it can be easy to find yourself regularly turning to unhealthy fast food lunches or indulging in sugar-filled snacks. While it may be something you feel reluctant to bring up, there are plenty of lifestyle suggestions, resources and referrals that a GP can provide, as well as simply lending a supportive ear. “Part of the skill of being a GP is picking your moments to start a conversation about delicate subjects. Some people come in ready to talk about their weight, some do not. I generally take a weight as part of my routine clinical review/examination, and discuss as I, and the patient, feel appropriate,” says Dr Tellis. He explains there are plenty of ways a GP could assist someone with issues stemming from stress and over eating. It may be a discussion about healthy diet — including good food choices, a better routine and when to eat — or stress management advice, and if necessary, a psychology or counselling referral. “What I would like to say as a doctor is that the door is open. Come in and say hello. You set the agenda as the patient.”

 

*Originally published here

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

Physical Activity and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Then came Nutrition.

Then Smoking.

Now Physical Activity.

 

 

Remember those challenges of life? Men face challenges – we have to be providers, to be strong, to keep our emotions bottled up. Challenges are faced with solutions…or avoided with distractions. Let’s look at a solution. Physical Activity. This is a subject close to my heart and I’ve talked about it a few times before. In fact, you might even say I’ve talked about it a lot.

 

 

nick tellis running melbourne

 

 

What can Your GP do to help you get more physical activity into your life? We can explore specifics in person, but here are the basics.

 

 

Work up to 10,000 steps a day

Do something that makes you sweat for 25-45 minutes, 3-5 times a week

Find a physical activity you enjoy and make it regular

Get together with some like minded active friends

Repeat

 

 

 

Remember, getting physical activity back into your life can be hard, and many people won’t get it right first try. Your GP knows this and won’t give up on you. We can abandon a plan, but we won’t abandon you.

 

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So Men, Partridge Street General Practice is going to meet you halfway. We’re reaching out to You and we’re looking forward to you reaching back to us.
We challenge you to get healthier with us. 

  • Stop smoking
  • Cut down drinking
  • Eat better
  • Get more physical activity into your life

We’re going to do it, we’re going to live it, and the team at Partridge Street General Practice are going to run the City to Bay this year for the Childhood Cancer Association

Support them while we support you!

More details soon!

 


See you then or in person if you’d like to talk.




 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

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Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

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Smoking and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Then came Nutrition.

Now Smoking.

 

 

In life we all face challenges. Men face challenges – we have to be providers, to be strong, to keep our emotions bottled up. Challenges are faced with solutions…or avoided with distractions. Smoking is unequivocally a distraction from the challenges of life. Many patients say to me that they smoke because they’re bored or because it’s ‘their time’. Lets try another way. It’s healthier, you’ll live longer, and be fitter. You’ll also have more money, smell better, and be more attractive.

 

 

Image result for good looking non smoker

 

 

What can Your GP do to help you give smoking the boot? We ask you about your smoking, get an idea of how much and when you smoke, and then go into why you smoke. What does it do for you? We can then help by offering some solutions rather than distractions. Counselling, Psychotherapy, Hypnosis, and medications are all options we can explore in person. Remember, smoking is addictive, and many people will not quit for good the first time they try. Your GP knows this and won’t give up on you. We can abandon a plan, but we won’t abandon you.

 

 

 

Ask

Assess

Advise

Assist

Arrange Follow Up

 

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much you smoke (and what you smoke) and why and when you smoke.

 

 

 

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How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Nutrition and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

 

Next is Nutrition.

 

 

 

 

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You are what you eat and you just cannot out-exercise a bad diet. I wrote about this a few times before…

here

 

here

 

here

 

and even here!

 

 

What are my tips?

 

 

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Smaller Portions

Mindful Eating

No Sugar (including, as far as possible for you, ‘hidden’ sugars)

More Water

Less Alcohol

 

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much food you eat and why and when you eat it.

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Alcohol and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up is Alcohol.

 

 

alcohol men

 

drink-driving-statistics-facts alcohol men

 

 

 

Alcohol affects every organ system in the body and contributes (negatively) to pretty much every physical and mental ailment. Have a think about it. Remember the CAGE questions:

 

 

 

Have you ever felt you needed to Cut down on your drinking?

Have people Annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?

Have you ever felt Guilty about drinking?

Have you ever felt you needed a drink first thing in the morning (Eye-opener) to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover?

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much alcohol you drink. Think about why you drink. I’ve even got some thinking music for you.

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

3 Free Tips for 2017 – A New You with Partridge Street General Practice!

You can make a New Year’s Resolutions anytime! Imagine instantly feeling better and healthier with these Three Free Tips from Partridge Street General Practice!

 

 

Lose Weight

 

 

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There is an Easier way to lose your excess weight. Move more, eat less, and eat better. I Guarantee Everyone will have some success with these methods!

 

 

First, set some movement goals every day. Ten thousand steps is a good start. Your smart phone will track this for you with no other expensive device required. Your next step is 25-45 minutes of activity that makes you sweat, 3-5 times a week.

 

 

 

Second, Get Rid of Sugar. You’ll eat less and you’ll eat better. Just Do It.

 

 

 

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Quit Smoking

 

 

There is one question I ask of people who want to Stop Smoking.

 

‘Do you like Smoking?’

 

Think About It.

 

Then Imagine Not Smoking.

 

We are Here to Help You Now!

 

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Feel Better Instantly

 

You are the Youngest you’ll ever be and You have the Most Time you’ll ever have. Invest that Time wisely. Be Grateful. See your Friends and Family (including your Fur Family 😎 ) who make You Feel great! Live your life actively and intentionally. We live in a fantastic time and all things are possible, make the most of it.

 

 

 

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Partridge Street General Practice is Here to Help You achieve your Health Goals. Feel Healthier, Feel Better – see us Here!

 

 

 

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City to Bay 2016


What a day! I had a great run and I’m not going to even mention all the eating I did afterwards!

Huge congratulations to:

Dr Martin Davey from Rose Street General Practice who was the fastest GP from Glenelg – 57.31 – magnificent effort!

Martin – you Legend!

Dr Jennie Wright, for running a great time, but mostly for getting us all organised and setting up the fundraising for Zaidi Ya Dreams (donate here). 

Dr Lane Hinchcliffe for running the full 12kms after breaking his leg in 2015 (I won’t post his selfie here…I will release it for the right amount to charity 😉)

To Bayside Family Musculoskeletal Practice and The Health Hub for the fastest male and female runners respectively!

And finally to the awesome team at Partridge Street General Practice who walked, cooked, prepared, fundraised, and supported our patients (and me!) for far more than 12kms in September!!

This week, we’re all back to work – and looking forward to bigger and better things to come in 2016 and beyond!

Bookings here

And here’s what’s coming…

Bigger and Better