Childhood Cancer Association, City to Bay, and Partridge Street General Practice 

‘Tis better to give than receive.

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is glad to announce that we’ll be raising money for Childhood Cancer Association by running (or walking) at the City to Bay 2017.

 

 

 

 

Last year was a great success with plenty raised for Zaidi Ya Dreams orphanage and we hope to improve this year.

 

 

 

 

So get your runners on and run, walk, and give! You’ll feel better!

 

Donate to Childhood Cancer Association here

Doctor’s orders! 😉👍

 

 

 

 

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Ali Waddell

Dr Emmy Bauer

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

Join the Team at Partridge Street General Practice!

It’s a great time to be a GP in Australia at the moment. We live in an affluent First World country with good social services and welfare and a strong public health safety net. It’s peaceful, spacious, and even the winter cold feels good after the warm summer! Have a look!!

​​

 

 

 

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is a General Practice with an established patient base in a beautiful old house close to Adelaide’s famous Glenelg Beach. It’s a diverse area, with old and young and everyone in between, as well as tourists and travellers, especially when that sun comes out! We provide professional, empowering, comprehensive primary health care to this area and we think this is a pretty awesome challenge.

 

 

 

 

 

We’re meeting this challenge by recruiting great GPs who want to do great work in our great practice. We offer:

 

 

😀 Healthy work-life balance

 

😀 Practice in one of the most beautiful parts of South Australia

 

😀 SA owned and operated Clinic with a Great Team

 

😀 Plenty of Patients

 

😀 A strong Teaching Focus

 

 

 

 

 

Our practice is fully computerised and as paperless as we can make it, AGPAL accredited, with a strong teaching ethos supported by a great nursing team who assist with Chronic Disease Management and Treatment room duties. Our team delivers an efficient and friendly medical service to our patients and our GPs.

 

Partridge Street General Practice is a mixed billing practice with bulk billed and private accounts for services. This allows 15 minute appointments as a base. We’re proud to offer the time for:

 

 

😀 Women’s Health, Mirenas, and Implanons

😀 Mental Health Care and Counseling

😀 Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery

😀 Travel Medicine and Immunisations

😀 Iron Infusions

 

 

Our patients will be as important to you as they are to us, they are the foundation and the focus of Partridge Street General Practice!

 

 

Be part of the future here at Partridge Street General Practice. Enjoy the autonomy of private practice while retaining the collegiality and teaching ethos that is so important to all of us. R U OK…or could you be Better?

 

Email Ms Tracey Mills, our awesome Practice Manager on pm@partridgegp.com.au or pop in to have a coffee and a chat!

 

 

Physical Activity and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Then came Nutrition.

Then Smoking.

Now Physical Activity.

 

 

Remember those challenges of life? Men face challenges – we have to be providers, to be strong, to keep our emotions bottled up. Challenges are faced with solutions…or avoided with distractions. Let’s look at a solution. Physical Activity. This is a subject close to my heart and I’ve talked about it a few times before. In fact, you might even say I’ve talked about it a lot.

 

 

nick tellis running melbourne

 

 

What can Your GP do to help you get more physical activity into your life? We can explore specifics in person, but here are the basics.

 

 

Work up to 10,000 steps a day

Do something that makes you sweat for 25-45 minutes, 3-5 times a week

Find a physical activity you enjoy and make it regular

Get together with some like minded active friends

Repeat

 

 

 

Remember, getting physical activity back into your life can be hard, and many people won’t get it right first try. Your GP knows this and won’t give up on you. We can abandon a plan, but we won’t abandon you.

 

Image result for what now

 

So Men, Partridge Street General Practice is going to meet you halfway. We’re reaching out to You and we’re looking forward to you reaching back to us.
We challenge you to get healthier with us. 

  • Stop smoking
  • Cut down drinking
  • Eat better
  • Get more physical activity into your life

We’re going to do it, we’re going to live it, and the team at Partridge Street General Practice are going to run the City to Bay this year for the Childhood Cancer Association

Support them while we support you!

More details soon!

 


See you then or in person if you’d like to talk.




 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Smoking and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Then came Nutrition.

Now Smoking.

 

 

In life we all face challenges. Men face challenges – we have to be providers, to be strong, to keep our emotions bottled up. Challenges are faced with solutions…or avoided with distractions. Smoking is unequivocally a distraction from the challenges of life. Many patients say to me that they smoke because they’re bored or because it’s ‘their time’. Lets try another way. It’s healthier, you’ll live longer, and be fitter. You’ll also have more money, smell better, and be more attractive.

 

 

Image result for good looking non smoker

 

 

What can Your GP do to help you give smoking the boot? We ask you about your smoking, get an idea of how much and when you smoke, and then go into why you smoke. What does it do for you? We can then help by offering some solutions rather than distractions. Counselling, Psychotherapy, Hypnosis, and medications are all options we can explore in person. Remember, smoking is addictive, and many people will not quit for good the first time they try. Your GP knows this and won’t give up on you. We can abandon a plan, but we won’t abandon you.

 

 

 

Ask

Assess

Advise

Assist

Arrange Follow Up

 

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much you smoke (and what you smoke) and why and when you smoke.

 

 

 

File_001

 

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Nutrition and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up was Alcohol.

Next is Nutrition.

 

 

 

 

img_1724

 

 

 

You are what you eat and you just cannot out-exercise a bad diet. I wrote about this a few times before…

here

here

here

and even here!

 

What are my tips?

 

 

6f3385db-5d62-4b53-b1e4-0f6078d15ce0

 

 

Smaller Portions

Mindful Eating

No Sugar (including, as far as possible for you, ‘hidden’ sugars)

More Water

Less Alcohol

 

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much food you eat and why and when you eat it.

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Alcohol and Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

First up is Alcohol.

 

 

alcohol men

 

drink-driving-statistics-facts alcohol men

 

 

 

Alcohol affects every organ system in the body and contributes (negatively) to pretty much every physical and mental ailment. Have a think about it. Remember the CAGE questions:

 

 

 

Have you ever felt you needed to Cut down on your drinking?

Have people Annoyed you by criticizing your drinking?

Have you ever felt Guilty about drinking?

Have you ever felt you needed a drink first thing in the morning (Eye-opener) to steady your nerves or to get rid of a hangover?

 

 

 

Sit down. Have a think about how much alcohol you drink. Think about why you drink. I’ve even got some thinking music for you.

 

 

How did you go? See you next post or in person if you’d like to talk.

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.

Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.

Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

Men’s Health Week 2017 at Partridge Street General Practice 

June is Men’s Health Month and June 12-16 is Men’s Health Week at Partridge Street General Practice. Men are important and Health is important so let’s look at some issues in Men’s Health.

 

 

Do you look after yourself like you do your car?

 

From the Men’s Health Week website:

 

A boy born in Australia in 2010 has a life expectancy of 78.0 years while a baby girl born at the same time could expect to live to 82.3 years old. Right from the start, boys suffer more illness, more accidents and die earlier than their female counterparts.
Men take their own lives at four times the rate of women (that’s five men a day, on average). Accidents, cancer and heart disease all account for the majority of male deaths.
Seven leading causes are common to both males and females, although only Ischaemic heart disease shares the same ranking in both sexes (1st). Malignant neoplasms of prostate (6th), Malignant neoplasms of lymphoid, haematopoietic and related tissue (7th) and Intentional self-harm (10th) are only represented within the male top 10 causes.

 

 

Smoking, Skin Cancer, Suicide, and So Much Alcohol

 

The above figures are taken from the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Furthermore, there are specific populations of marginalised men with far worse health statistics. These marginalised groups include Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander men, refugees, men in prison or newly released from prison and men of low socioeconomic standing.

 

Men’s Health Week has a direct focus on the health impacts of men’s and boys’ environments. It serves to ask two questions:

 

What factors in men’s and boy’s environments contribute to the status of male health as indicated in the table above?

How can we turn that around and create positive environments in men’s and boy’s lives?

 

We’re going to ask and answer those questions this week. Stay with us online and in person – we’ve got your back!

 

img_8730

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Ali Waddell

 

Dr Emmy Bauer

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

img_1440

 

 

The RACGP EGM – #bekind

The RACGP is about to have an Extraordinary General Meeting.

 

 

Why and why is this important?

 

 

The YES case from Dr Edwin Kruys 

The NO case from Dr Harry Nespolon

I see a lot of anger in the GP community.

 

This didn’t go well…

Some of this anger comes across like this:

Read up on the changes here and here.

I’m voting – are you? I believe General Practice is one of the greatest vocations around. Don’t be angry, be informed, support your college and your colleagues, and #bekind.

 

Happy voting!

Business For Doctors Conference

Good Medicine is Good Business.

I’ve summed it all up in five words. The End. I’ve been an owner of medical practices for over 10 years and a doctor for nearly double that. Good Medicine is the bedrock of all Good Medical Businesses  but it’s not all that goes into a Good Medical Business. How do you practice Good Medicine when you can’t pay your bills? How can you keep your mind on your valued patients if business worries are weighing on you? Your Business starts with You and so looking after yourself is a great start. A healthy mind in a healthy body and a business focus in a medical career are great systems for allowing doctors to practice the great medicine their valued patients deserve.

nick tellis running melbourne

I’m heading off to the Business for Doctors conference in Melbourne. I’ve packed my running gear and I’ll be working on my business focus, a healthy mind, a healthy body, and a great practice.

melbourne by night
Melbourne – who can resist?

Here’s some of the conference details.

Friday Program

Friday June 2 2017


2 Keynotes, 23 workshops including 2 interactive business learning workshops for BAS and Web design.

Keynote Speakers
Dr April Armstrong – Founder and Director, Business for Doctors
Michael Traill – Using Business Disciplines for Social Purpose. Lessons from the trenches of social enterprise.
Headshots Professional Photographs (Full delegates only or $50 onsite) from 10am

Workshop Presenters include:
Dr Jon Brown – Web Design
Dr April Armstrong – MBS – Pack & Stack – strategic model for maximising income in general practice
Dr Juvi Arulanandararajah – Stress management – “Burnout”
Dr Sachin Patel – Seven secrets of a Successful private practice
Dr Cate Howell – Navigating Relationships
Jamie Holroyd – Stratosphere – How to grow your practice & One page business plan
Alan Smith – Accountant – BAS workshop
Matthew Holden – Accountant – Business Structures for Doctor & Understand Tax Strategies
Arabin-Foye Private Wealth – Ryder Widdowson – What I wished doctors knew about money and wealth (double session)
Health & Co – Selling your practice to a corporate & Tax consideration when selling your business
Medlife- Roy Bostleman – – Understanding Personal Insurances: Tips for Optimising your Policies & Personal Insurance for Practice Owners: Tips and Trap
Tego – Melanie Tan – Demystifying medical indemnity and ways to mitigate your risk
BOQ – Melinda Goddard & Lloyd Levin – Financing a practice – New start-ups and Buy ins

Cocktail Networking: Included with Full, discount and day delegate tickets. Tickets Available on request for partners, practice managers and medical colleagues and BFD Facebook members – $50

Saturday Program

Saturday June 3 2017

2 keynote speakers, 23 workshops and including 2 interactive workshops.
Headshots professional Photographs (full delegates only or $50 onsite) from 8.30am

Keynote speakers
Noel Whittaker – Building wealth in Challenging Times
Dr Cate Howell

Workshop Presenters Include
Dr Jon Brown – Web design 2 – marketing and google analytics
Dr Sachin Patel – The 5 pillars of preventative life care
Dr Cate Howell – Work-life integration & Emotional Intelligence
Stratosphere – Jamie Holroyd – Budgets Forecasts- Profit & loss/Balance Sheet/Cash flow
Dr George Forgan-Smith – Marketing and Branding – interactive workshop
Dr Juvi Arulanandararajah – How to keep your self (and yourself) sane, productive and happy
Nexus Legal – Alan Prasad – Business Structures – understanding tax and strategies to minimise & Case Study on Legal Risks
Employsure – Brad Walkes & Elizabeth Burns- The importance of contracts and policies for business owners
Araban-Foyle Private Wealth Pty Ltd – Ryder Widdowson – Superannuation and Self managed super funds (double session)
Brentnells SA – transitioning from Employee Doctors to Independent Practitioner & High Performing Medical Practices

Gala Dinner – Tickets $150 – additional tickets now available for practice manager, partners and medical colleagues. BFD Facebook members $175

Sunday June 4 2017

Key Note Speaker
Tim Read – Marketing – The Boomerang Effect
Dr April Armstrong – closing address and special announcements

Workshop Presenters:

Dr Cate Howell – Health and Wellbeing Script
Stratosphere – Jamie Holroyd- Shareholders and Partners Agreements & Debt and balance sheet gearing
Dr April Armstrong – MBS workshop (double session) Implementing Billing Strategies – double your billings in 60 days
Property Investment – Quantity Surveying

Workshop Recordings: All Keynote speakers, practice set up and MBS workshops will be recorded as well as a number of other workshops over the 2 1/2 days. Full delegates can request recordings at no charge once available from armchair medical

You can read more here.

I’m really looking forward to this and taking back some valuable information. Feel free to say hi when you see me running around at the conference and like this post and there’s a coffee in it! Partridge Street General Practice is also looking for Great GPs – could it be you?

Remember – GPs and other doctors are always learning. Learn more, be better, practice better medicine AND have more time for you, your family, your patients, and your health! What more could you ask?

Budget 2017 in Pictures

Politicians are going to politic.

What do GPs have to say about it?

Dr Ewen McPhee on behalf of the RDAA

Dr Bastian Seidel on behalf of the RACGP

 

 

 

 

So, in summary, it’s not great but we’re still Here to Help.

If you have ANY questions – See Your GP!

Our Team can Help You.

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

Dr Nick Tellis

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Ali Waddell

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Emmy Bauer