How to take a good (medical) selfie

Selfies. We’ve all done it. Some good, some bad, some downright embarrassing. However, there are some embarrassing pictures you may want to see the light of day – with your doctor. That funny rash that goes away, that cut you weren’t sure needed stitches or that mole you’ve been keeping an eye on.

 

 

(Unlikely to be a medical issue)

Smartphones and cameras are in our bags and wallets and people are using them!

 

The ABC recognises the medical selfie and here at Partridge Street General Practice we see and take many medical photos.

 

There are many benefits:

We can clarify the lesion/area/rash of concern to You

We can document changes over time or with treatment

We can use the images to obtain a second or subspecialist opinion

We can use the images for teaching and training

 

Of course, we provide the same great high quality service for clinical photography as we do for all of the work in General Practice and so we are guided by information like this.

We also MUST get Your informed consent for all of this! We will ask You whether you are happy with clinical photography, and You can specifically consent to any or all of the above uses. No posting to Facebook!

 

Partridge Street General Practice is proud to provide excellence in General Practice Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery – and great Clinical Photography is part of this. We look forward to helping you with regular skin checks and any treatment you may need. Book your skin check right here.

 

Skin cancer check risk dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

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Welcoming Dr Gareth Boucher to Partridge Street General Practice

 

Partridge Street General Practice is very happy to have Dr Gareth Boucher with us long term.

 

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Dr Gareth completed his undergraduate medical studies in Auckland and all of his post-graduate training has been in Adelaide. His medical areas of interest include:

 

  • babies and kids (neonates and paediatrics)
  • emergency medicine,
  • chronic disease management
  • palliative care

 

Outside of work Dr Gareth enjoys cycling, skiing, and photography.

 

 

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He is a GP Palliative Shared Care Provider, as are Dr Tellis and Dr Mouktaroudis. We’ll let Dr Gareth explain this:

 

 

What is palliative care?

Palliative care is holistic care of people with life-limiting illnesses.  Holistic care means we focus on them, not their illness!

Their goals and ambitions

Their mental, physical, and spiritual well-being

Their symptoms

Their dignity

 

We provide care in the community and co-ordinate service providers. We support patients and their families to maintain quality of life and achieve the outcomes important to them.

The Team at Partridge Street General Practice is able to help you and your family with any Palliative Care needs.

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx and our local Medical School at Flinders University.

 


This means that the GPs at Partridge Street General Practice are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

Award Winning Responsibility!

 

 

All of our doctors here at Partridge Street General Practice are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital) or are studying towards these qualifications. This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.
We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at Partridge Street General Practice with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher is a key part of our growing Clinical Team.

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

Why do Men taking Viagra get More Skin Cancers?


Men who use Viagra seem to have a higher incidence of skin cancer! Why?

Have a look here

At Partridge Street General Practice we believe an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Your skin is the largest organ of your body and Australia has the highest rates of skin cancer in the world. How can we help you?

Firstly, be SUNSMART. 

– stay more in the shade

– wear a protective hat (I like the Chappell style broad brimmed cricket hat)

– cover up, long sleeved loose fitting clothing keeps you cool and keeps you safe

– sunglasses (also keep you cool 😎)

– sunscreen (SPF>30, re-apply every 2 hrs)

– limit your time in the sun (is there an app for that?)


Skin cancers can be split into two main groups, melanoma skin cancers (MSC) and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC).  If you have a close family member with melanoma, or you’ve had a past melanoma, you’re at increased risk of melanoma. If you’ve had non-melanoma skin cancer before the age of 40, you’re at increased risk of melanoma. However, you’re far more likely to have NMSC than melanoma and these are the NMSC risk factors:

– fair complexion

– you burn rather than tan

– light eye colour

– light or red hair

– over 40 years old

– male

– multiple solar keratoses

– high levels of ultraviolet exposure

– previous NMSC (60% of those diagnosed with NMSC will have another within 3 years)

– immunosuppression

So we’ve covered prevention – what next? If you’re in one of the risk groups above or if you’ve got an area of skin you’re concerned about, check it out and write it down. 


Then see Dr Nick Mouktaroudis here at Partridge Street General Practice for a comprehensive skin check and treatment plan. 

Here to Help

Look after yourself – we’re here to help!

Go Forth (Low Carb Week 4)

As promised, some body composition data!

Before
Also Before

This week has seen an improvement in eating. The eggs are making a regular appearance at lunch and breakfast has not been missed. My cough has gone, energy is high and I’ve had some good runs and solid gym sessions. I’ve even run down some Pokemons!

So how’s it going? What’s happening with weight, waist, and fat? Well…

Next Week

You’ll see next week!

Check out previous weeks here, here, and here, or see the real thing at Partridge Street General Practice here! Until next week…