Electronic Prescribing at PartridgeGP

You bet!

Those bits of paper your GP gives you to get medications from your Pharmacist are changing. Scripts are now DIGITAL!

GPs can now send prescriptions to pharmacists electronically as an interim solution during the pandemic. 

As part of the COVID-19 National Health Plan telehealth model, the new interim measure allows GPs to send prescriptions electronically to pharmacists without having to mail out a physical copy of the original paper prescription with a GP’s wet-ink signature.

Patients can then have their script filled and medication delivered to their door, helping to minimise the risk of virus transmission in accordance with social-distancing measures.

‘It’s certainly going to make it easier for practices, because they are being inundated with pharmacists asking them to post prescriptions to them,’
 
‘I know at my practices it’s causing substantial concern.
 
‘We’re getting calls every day from pharmacists saying, “I can’t dispense unless you send me the hardcopy paper”, and we’re saying, “We don’t have the resources to keep running out and buying stamps, and it’s just not safe to put staff in that position”.
 
‘So we’ve had a bit of a stalemate for the last few weeks and this is a great outcome in the short term.’

Dr Nathan Pinksier – GP

As outlined in guidelines issued by the Department of Health (DoH), GPs will be required to do as follows:

  1. Create a paper prescription during a telehealth consultation. This will need to be signed as normal or using a valid digital signature
  2. Create a clear copy of the entire prescription (a digital image such as a photo or PDF including the barcode where applicable)
  3. Send via email, fax or text message directly to the patient’s pharmacy of choice

Schedule 8 and 4(D) medicines such as opioids and fentanyl are not part of the interim arrangement.

While not legally required, the DoH encourages practices that are able to continue sending the original script to pharmacies to do so as soon as possible. All other practices must retain the paper prescription for a period of up to two years for audit and compliance purposes.

Yes!

This is a great step forwards!

Your GP at PartridgeGP

Your Pharmacist at Bayside Village Pharmacy

Coronavirus Help Desk – Partridge GP (update with Repat drive through clinic info)

We find ourselves at the start of a seeming pandemic.

 

Coronavirus – latest government info – CLICK HERE

 

If unwell with cough/cold symptoms, stay home and use the phone

 

CALL coronavirus hotline 1800 020 080

free advice, home testing after doctor advice

CALL healthdirect 1800 022 222

free advice

 

If further advice needed

 

CALL PartridgeGP 0882953200

phone consult, private fee, no Medicare rebate

CALL/ATTEND

nRAH

Flinders Medical Centre

Lyell McEwin Hospital

coronavirus clinics

free, can see and/or swab

 

updated re the Repat drive through clinic

 

Accessing the Repat Collection Centre:

Patients must be booked into this service to ensure a controlled flow

Bookings are to be made by the practice by ringing 8222 3000

The practice is to advise patient of date and time of booking

Fax the request form to SA Pathology on 7117 5085

The service is available between 8.00 am and 4.30 pm Monday to Friday

Access is via Gate 4, 216 Daws Road, then follow the signs

Please ask patients to remain in their car and the SA Pathology staff will come to them

Instruct the patient to remain in isolation until the results have been communicated to them by you (their GP)

 

The Royal Adelaide Hospital

7 days a week 0900-2000 – walk in, just follow the signs!

Royal Adelaide Clinic Location HERE

NEW Southern Suburbs Coronavirus Priority Care Clinic

 453 Morphett Rd, Oaklands Park 7 days a week, walk in 1000-2000

 

How Do I Self-Isolate- click HERE!

AND HERE

OR HERE!

 

 

 

coronaadvice

 

img_20200127_145549_wm7637784655035031070.png

Drive through COVID in Victoria!

Oh…you thought I meant testing!

I meant THIS

 

1552719486937

 

In other news

We find ourselves at the start of a seeming pandemic.

Coronavirus.

In addition to the medical risks to themselves, their friends and families, and their patients, GPs have to consider the risks to their livelihood and practices.

We can’t help our patients if we are ill.

We can’t help our patients if our practices are closed.

We can’t help our patients if we are isolated at home.

There may be solutions. One, from Dr Todd Cameron and Dr Sachin B Patel, is outlined in the following videos.

 

1. GPs to instigate protocols in the way they see patients

2. GPs to alter the things they need to see patients face to face for

3. GP Practices to support the GPs who pay them to do so

4. Use telehealth and have MBS item numbers 23/36 cover this in this time of need

The videos are here

 

And here

 

So what can you do as a GP to make these things happen?

Stephen Covey talks about a circle of influence and a circle of concern. Your circle of influence should be larger than your circle of concern or you just worry about things you can’t change. Let’s go further and consider a circle of impact.

Where can you apply your time and skills to make a change?

Here it is.

Join the AMA.

They have about 6000 GP members (my guesstimate). You can join for a monthly fee of somewhere between $15-130 a month as a GP or registrar. You don’t have to join the AMA – it is entirely voluntary. You can leave at any time, and take your money with you.

So join.

On your application, quite clearly state why you are joining and that this is THE thing you would like the AMA to make an impact on. The AMA have access to the politicians. From your membership to their ears.

Watch the videos.

Make your decision.

Join.

Take action.

Make a difference.

Good luck!

 

 

Coronavirus Help Desk – Partridge GP

We find ourselves at the start of a seeming pandemic.

Coronavirus – latest government info – CLICK HERE

 

If unwell with cough/cold symptoms, stay home and use the phone

 

CALL coronavirus hotline 1800 020 080

free advice, home testing after doctor advice

CALL healthdirect 1800 022 222

free advice

 

If further advice needed

 

CALL PartridgeGP 0882953200

phone consult, private fee, no Medicare rebate

CALL/ATTEND

nRAH

Flinders Medical Centre

Lyell McEwin Hospital

coronavirus clinics

free, can see and/or swab

The Royal Adelaide Hospital

7 days a week 0900-2000 – walk in, just follow the signs!

Royal Adelaide Clinic Location HERE

NEW Southern Suburbs Coronavirus Priority Care Clinic

 453 Morphett Rd, Oaklands Park 7 days a week, walk in 1000-2000

 

How Do I Self-Isolate- click HERE!

AND HERE

OR HERE!

 

 

coronaadvice

 

img_20200127_145549_wm7637784655035031070.png

GPs. Protect yourself. Join the AMA. Good reading for politicians!

We find ourselves at the start of a pandemic.

Coronavirus.

In addition to the medical risks to themselves, their friends and families, and their patients, GPs have to consider the risks to their livelihood and practices.

We can’t help our patients if we are ill.

We can’t help our patients if our practices are closed.

We can’t help our patients if we are isolated at home.

There may be solutions. One, from Dr Todd Cameron and Dr Sachin B Patel, is outlined in the following videos.

1. GPs to instigate protocols in the way they see patients – pivot to PHONE

2. GPs to alter the things they need to see patients face to face for – PHONE!

3. GP Practices to support the GPs who pay them to do so – BE SAFE!

4. Use telehealth and have MBS item numbers 23/36 cover this in this time of need

The videos are here

And here

So what can you do as a GP to make these things happen?

Stephen Covey talks about a circle of influence and a circle of concern. Your circle of influence should be larger than your circle of concern or you just worry about things you can’t change. Let’s go further and consider a circle of impact.

Where can you apply your time and skills to make a change?

Here it is.

Join the AMA.

They have about 6000 GP members (my guesstimate). You can join for a monthly fee of somewhere between $15-130 a month as a GP or registrar. You don’t have to join the AMA – it is entirely voluntary. You can leave at any time, and take your money with you.

So join.

On your application, quite clearly state why you are joining and that this is THE thing you would like the AMA to make an impact on. The AMA have access to the politicians. From your membership to their ears.

Watch the videos.

Make your decision.

Join.

Take action.

Make a difference.

Good luck!

Aged care royal commission continues in Canberra with focus on health care services, GP-patient relationships

https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-09/aged-care-royal-commission-continues-in-canberra/11777870

PartridgeGP and Dr Nick Tellis are proud to serve our older Australians in Residential Aged Care Facilities. It’s something we will do more of in 2020 – and we will do better 👍🏼

See our thoughts here:

Some ideas for improvement 🤔

Some more ideas for improvement 🤔

Book yourself or your relatives in an RACF in for an appointment by calling 82953200

And access our new patients in RACF forms right here


Resourcing, not medication restrictions, needed in aged care

Thanks to Dr Michael Clements and NewsGP from the RACGP for highlighting the needs for aged care 👍🏼

Dr Michael Clements


9/12/2019 3:14:11 PM

The Government’s recent funding injection has to be specifically targeted to address the problems GPs, staff and patients face within residential aged care facilities, Dr Michael Clements writes.

Aged care
Dr Michael Clements believes that while aged care requires a significant funding boost, it will only be helpful if it is specifically targeted to the sector’s needs.

‘Mrs X was found wandering at night in the carpark, can you please prescribe medication?’
 
This was how one recent residential aged care facility (RACF) interaction began for me.
 
After meeting with the staff and ruling out delirium or biochemical causes, and noting a worsening in the behavioural aspects of dementia, I suggested the patient move to the restricted ward or have extra supervision.
 
But my request was declined due to lack of beds and I was specifically asked, once again, to commence a medication to prevent the patient from wandering.
 
The situation was clear: under-staffing in this facility led to pressure to prescribe sedative medications that would keep the patient compliant and allow staff to attend to other residents.
 
Provision of care within RACFs has become more complex and time-consuming as the population ages and rates of dementia rise. Unfortunately, funding models have not kept pace, even as clinical governance requirements in RACFs have increased and nurse autonomy reduced.
 
This has led to a situation for many GPs who work within RACFs in which countless night-time phone calls, form-signing, box-ticking and compliance measures now form the largest part of their care. It has also led to an overreliance on anti-psychotic medications for the behavioural aspects of dementia, as understaffed facilities come under pressure to medicate their problems away.
 
GPs have been looking forward to the Royal Commission into Aged Care, Quality and Safety because they, along with RACF staff, have seen cost-cutting measures applied in facilities, with reductions in numbers of trained staff, greater reliance on lower-skilled assistants, and decreased activities and programs.
 
Staff across the aged care sector want to see better diversionary activities and care services, nursing numbers, and funding to allow GPs to spend more time with patients and their families. This is felt most acutely in rural and regional areas, which are already experiencing aged care staff and GP workforce shortages.
 
The Federal Government has suggested high prescriptions of anti-psychotic medications in RACFs is a source of the problem, rather than an indicator of a system that is under-resourced to deal with the complex issues of dementia care.
 
However, the latest promise of extra funding from the Federal Government does nothing to address the reasons behind the increased use of anti-psychotic medications for the behavioural aspects of dementia; it is simply ‘shooting the canary’ and will have no impact on the gas leak in the coalmine the canary has been screaming about for the last five years.
 
What RACFs need instead is funding targeted towards sufficient numbers of appropriately trained nursing staff, for GPs to provide comprehensive team-based care, and for tertiary services to get out of hospital grounds and into RACFs to work with GPs.
 
Novel solutions are required to the problems faced in residential aged care, and each facility will need to find one that reflects their community workforce and need.
 
But some general steps that will be helpful across the board include:

  • additional money injected into the system from federal and state health budgets
  • patients getting used to private fees for GP services
  • nurses and nurse practitioners being allowed to practice at their full scope
  • GP-led rather than GP-delivered care being utilised where possible.

The message should be clear: fund RACFs and GPs in order to enable them to provide the care that is so desperately needed.

Do not shoot the canary.

© 2018 The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) ABN 34 000 223 807

PartridgeGP and Dr Nick Tellis are doing our best for better aged care in many of our local aged care facilities. We will do more in 2020! Watch this space 👍🏼

Emergency thoughts from PartridgeGP

 

Thoughts on our Emergency Departments

 

Introduction by Croakey: Emergency departments are often thought of as the canary in the coalmine, but what do we do when the canary is clearly in distress?

Dr Simon Judkins, President of the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine (ACEM), started a much-needed conversation about Australia’s overburdened emergency departments back in September with a post to coincide with national RUOK Day.

In response, an anonymous emergency clinician penned this searing, heartfelt account of the very real pressures ED workers face every day. If you haven’t yet read it, we’d very much encourage you to do so.

While only one person’s story, it resonated with and captured the experience of many, reflecting a system underresourced and overwhelmed, according to Judkins, who wrote an open letter in reply — below — calling for courageous reform.


Simon Judkins writes:

Dear Anonymous,

You are not anonymous to me; I know you.

 

Read on…

 

Meet
Treat
Street

 

You don’t need to meet them if they are being dealt with in primary care and have better access to non GP specialist outpatients

 

You treat them better with specialist oversight and so FACEMS 24/7 should be funded to provide that

 

You can’t street them unless you have access to inpatient beds (better use of inpatient beds – yes, care awaiting placement and inappropriate admissions are still things) and better clinical handover to primary care GPs will reduce bounce back and improve patient care

 

The funding model needs to reflect this
Because hospital EDs are a volume model at the moment for funding so there really isn’t the institutional drive to reduce demand

 

A recurring thought at GP19 was the embedding of GPwSI in non GP specialist hospital areas to improve these areas – works in Queensland but I think SA have spent all the $ on bricks and mortar.

 

GPs can help!

 

For patients – book in here to see Your GP at PartridgeGP

 

 

 

 

And for other doctors – including our great colleagues in hospitals and their Emergency Departments…we can help too! Clinical Handover is awesome – we can all do better!

 

gpdu clinical handover

 

GPDU Clinical Handover infographic – final for dissemination

 

 

Secrets Healthy Men know with PartridgeGP and Coles

Tim Ferriss asked a question in his book Tribe of Mentors.

 

 

‘If you could put a message on a billboard, to be seen by millions (or billions) of people, what would you say?’

 

 

I was lucky enough to have an opportunity to answer this in real life when a journalist from Coles contacted me. They wanted to know a GPs views on Men’s Health. The article we produced is here (and reproduced below). This is in the Coles Health and Beauty magazine – they have printed 500,000 copies of this! What was that one message I wanted to get across?

 

 

dr nick tellis coles health and beauty the money quote
The Message!

 

 

 

 

Our practice, PartridgeGP, our GPs, and the rest of our team are here for you. No billboards needed – just book in for an appointment 😎

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_20190404_191100

 

screenshot_20191004-1758348084653204647720310.png

 

screenshot_20191004-1758545032897441374207386.png

 

The Road to being a GP with PartridgeGP

Just check out this picture of what someone goes through to become a GP. Wow!

(thanks to Dr Jared Dart for finding this)

 

 

How do doctors get to be doctors.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

PartridgeGP is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx.

 

 

 

This means that the GPs at PartridgeGP are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

 

img_1954
Teaching Practice of the Year

 

 

All of our doctors here at PartridgeGP are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.

 

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at PartridgeGP with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

 

Some of our recent GP registrars

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Clare Mackillop

 

 

 

 

IMG_20190404_191100

 

 

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Nici Williams

 

Dr David Hooper

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Clare Mackillop

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Jen Becker

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis