Be Super Kind

Doctors are people too. Is this a controversial statement? I’m going to go further and say doctors are people first. I bring this up because some doctors are amazing but they are still only human. There’s a special respect from me for our rural doctors including rural generalist GPs. To me, they are Superhuman! I look at what I do now, and what I used to do as a rural doctor (within 30km of a major Australian city), and, to quote a popular film it’s not the same game. It may not even be the same sport.

 

 

 

I’ll move to some other popular culture. A guilty secret of mine is that I like comics. One series I really liked (and beware this is a NSFW comic and not for children) is Irredeemable. It’s the story of an alien superman (The Plutonian) who becomes a superhero on Earth. He’s super resilent, can fly, has superhuman endurance…you know, those usual rural generalist abilities. The series opens with a family running for their lives. Heat beams target them. Their house is reduced to rubble. Spoiler Alert – they die. Hovering in midair over their bodies is The Plutonian. What happened?

 

 

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Prior to the above events, the Plutonian was doing his thing, saving people. It’s what he did. Day in, day out, with never a day of rest. He stops a nuclear bomb going off in a packed sports stadium. The crowd goes wild. He stands there, letting his adrenaline drop down. One voice comes to his ears amongst the adulation of the crowd.

 

 

‘What a poser’, or words to that effect. Only a few words, only one person, and buried in a sea of praise. But they were enough. They were too much. Superhumans are human too. Perhaps they are human first too? He snaps and flies off.

 

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I think 14 doctors committed suicide in the last 12 months. I could be wrong about this number. I’m not wrong when I suspect the number that had contemplated suicide was probably much higher. I don’t know the answer but being kind is a good start. Please, be kind. That is all.

 

#bekind

I would love to hear other views on this. We are all professionals or patients or both and we can always improve. Let me know here on the blog (or on our website) – or, if you’re a GP, on the fantastic GPDU FB Group – where GPs are invited to a festival of education and collegiality (#FOAMed – #GPDU18) May 30 – June 1!

 

Get a Great GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

Dr Nick Tellis

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Katherine Astill 1

We look forward to seeing you soon!

Qi at Partridge Street General Practice

We’ve just celebrated the Chinese New Year – the Year of the Dog. People born in Dog years display loyalty and honesty amongst many other good qualities. However it is said that they can also be critical – maybe overly so. Segueing to another Chinese concept, we meet Qi, the vital life force that flows through the body. Let’s put these together.

 

 

 

A wise man once told me that the three pillars (the vital life force) of general practice are quality, service, and finance. All three of these come together in the form of the Practice Incentive Payments (PIP) scheme. You can read about this here but in summary Accredited General Practices are paid amounts of money for reaching certain quality measures. These include planning the management of a proportion of patients with diabetes and asthma, and ensuring women are screened for cervical cancer. There are also Incentive Payments for managing aged care and quality in prescribing.

 

 

 

 

These payments were due for a change on May 1st 2018. Were they promoting the vital life force of General Practice, were they tick box exercises for busy GPs, or were they overly critical of General Practice, not focusing on true quality? Enter QI – Quality Improvement. Rather than Qi, QI may be an altogether different beast.

 

 

But!

 

 

The Department of Health has confirmed that the Practice Incentive Program Quality Improvement Incentive will now occur from 1 May 2019.

 

 

From their press release:

 

 

The Practice Incentive Program (PIP) has been a key driver in quality care in the general practice sector and the PIP QI Incentive will continue to build on this important work, further strengthening quality improvement in primary health care. The additional 12 months will enable the Department, with the support and advice from PIPAG, to ensure that any implementation issues are identified and addressed and that general practices have adequate opportunity to prepare. It will also allow the Department to continue to consult with stakeholders on refining the design of the PIP QI Incentive.

 

The changed time frame will mean that the following five incentives which were to cease on 1 May 2018, will now continue through to 30 April 2019.

 

 

The five incentives are:

Asthma Incentive

Quality Prescribing Incentive

Cervical Screening Incentive

Diabetes Incentive

General Practitioner Aged Care Access Incentive

 

The six PIP Incentives that continue to remain unchanged are:

eHealth Incentive

After Hours Incentive

Rural Loading Incentive

Teaching Payment

Indigenous Health Incentive

Procedural General Practitioner Payment

 

 

What next? Will the new QI beast be reflective of quality in General Practice? Will the measures align with what we as General Practitioners believe is high quality Great General Practice care? Or will it aptly be launched in the Chinese Year of the Pig in 2019?

 

For what it’s worth, here are my measurements of quality, service, and finance in General Practice – the Qi of GP:

 

 

Quality – Time and Presence with Our Valued Patients

 

Service – Charging a private fee to those who can pay, allowing us to be charitable to those who cannot

 

Finance – Running Practices efficiently and well, with clinicians as owners steering the course of patient centred practices.

 

 

I would love to hear other views on this. We are all professionals or patients or both and we can always improve. Let me know here on the blog (or on our website) – or, if you’re a GP, on the fantastic GPDU FB Group – where GPs are invited to a festival of education and collegiality (#FOAMed – #GPDU18) May 30 – June 1! My last quality ltip – for personally better Qi – is below!

 

Get a Great GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

Dr Nick Tellis

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Katherine Astill 1

We look forward to seeing you soon!

How to take a good (medical) selfie

Selfies. We’ve all done it. Some good, some bad, some downright embarrassing. However, there are some embarrassing pictures you may want to see the light of day – with your doctor. That funny rash that goes away, that cut you weren’t sure needed stitches or that mole you’ve been keeping an eye on.

 

 

(Unlikely to be a medical issue)

Smartphones and cameras are in our bags and wallets and people are using them!

 

The ABC recognises the medical selfie and here at Partridge Street General Practice we see and take many medical photos.

 

There are many benefits:

We can clarify the lesion/area/rash of concern to You

We can document changes over time or with treatment

We can use the images to obtain a second or subspecialist opinion

We can use the images for teaching and training

 

Of course, we provide the same great high quality service for clinical photography as we do for all of the work in General Practice and so we are guided by information like this.

We also MUST get Your informed consent for all of this! We will ask You whether you are happy with clinical photography, and You can specifically consent to any or all of the above uses. No posting to Facebook!

 

Partridge Street General Practice is proud to provide excellence in General Practice Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery – and great Clinical Photography is part of this. We look forward to helping you with regular skin checks and any treatment you may need. Book your skin check right here.

 

Skin cancer check risk dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

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#BFD17 x #newtech

We live in an instant world and we seek convenience. How can technology give you more of what you want while Your GP gives you more of what you need?

 

 

 

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Thanking David Dahm from Health and Life

 

 

We never want to lose the doctor patient relationship in General Practice. It’s the most valuable part (and the most rewarding part) of our vocation and service as GPs. If we can have technology in the background rather than in the way, I think we can strengthen this. Facebook is one example.

 

 

dr nick tellis talk to me facebook your gp

 

 

 

Here’s another. Step one: buy a gaming keyboard. Step two: Program some macros. Step three: Spend more time with Our Valued Patients and less with our technology and medical software!

 

 

 

Here’s me cutting my login time to zero. It’s one small step for Dr Nick….

 

 

 

 

 

 

dr nick tellis keyboard macros
16 macros to go…

 

 

 

dr nick tellis business is not a dirty word
Be Better (thanks Dr Ajay Naidu for the flattering pictures!)

 

 

What do you think?. Is this part of the future? Too soon?

 

 

Not what you want? Let me know. In the meantime, we’re all still here for you at Partridge Street General Practice, face to face, IRL 😎

 

 

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

 

Talk to Your GP

​Not so long ago it was quite hard to contact Your GP. You had to phone the practice to make an appointment (some waiting), come to the practice (more waiting), and then sit in the waiting room (more waiting). We live in an instant world and we seek convenience. How can technology give you more of what you want while Your GP gives you more of what you need? Try this!

 

 

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More and more of our valued patients are choosing to book online but You can still call Partridge Street General Practice and we’re always happy to talk to you. You can also email us or contact us here for non-urgent inquiries, remembering that email is not a secure form of communication.

 

 

 

Imagine if you could ask some simple questions of Your GP, without waiting on the phone or sitting in the waiting room. Simple questions that have been asked of me in the past:

 

 

 

When should I come in to see you next?

I lost my script, what do I do?

I was discharged from hospital, what next?

 

 

 

We never want to lose the doctor patient relationship in General Practice. It’s the most valuable part (and the most rewarding part) of our vocation and service as GPs. If we can add to it, by improving communication before a face to face consult, I think we can strengthen this. We have a trial project with free access to a secure app where you can speak with me (not Facebook!). It’s not for urgent consultations! It’s free to sign up – you only pay if you use it.

Have a look here!

 

 

dr nick tellis talk to me facebook your gp
Talk to Your GP

 

 

 

 

What do you think – tell me here (or on the app!) about what you think. Is this part of the future? Too soon? Not what you want? Let me know. In the meantime, we’re all still here for you at Partridge Street General Practice, face to face, IRL 😎

 

 

 

Your GPs at Partridge Street General Practice

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

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