Winaugeration! Expanding Allied Health Services at PartridgeGP

This post is a politics free zone. Thank God for that! PartridgeGP is entering 2021 with some big challenges to come – a pandemic, mass vaccinations for influenza and COVID, an economic downturn, and whatever else the year has to bring. We are absolutely committed to helping our patients, our community, and the doctors and allied health professionals we serve! Here to Help – and this is what we have in store for the first 6 weeks of the year…

Rosie – Foot and Sole Podiatry

General Practice always involves teamwork – Your GP knows a fair bit about a lot, but there are always subject matter experts or specialists. We have Physiotherapy with Rod and Movement Theory, Specialist Urology Services with Dr Nick Brook and the team from EastWest Urology, and Podiatry with Rosie from Foot and Sole Podiatry onsite, and we have THREE awesome psychologists to help your mental health and wellbeing – Mr Mark Edwards, Ms Monika Kolta, and introducing Ms Jen Riches!

Rod and Movement Theory – Building You Up!

Mark Edwards is a registered psychologist and Flinders Medical School lecturer. He has over 30 years of psychology experience helping people with simple to very complex personal and relationship problems.

Jen is a registered psychologist experienced in providing services to adolescents and adults. She has worked with individuals experiencing a range of life issues such as relationship and family breakdowns, bullying, unemployment, drug and alcohol abuse, grief and loss, social isolation and legal issues. She works with people experiencing a range of complex mental health issues including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder and psychosis. She has experience in providing psychology services to clients through secure online video conferencing and face to face. Aside from her private practice experience Jen has worked at Headspace, Lifeline, and MATES in Construction. Jen is passionate about providing professional, down to earth and practical psychology services. 

Jen draws on a range of evidence-based therapeutic approaches including Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, Dialectical Behaviour Therapy, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Schema Therapy. Jen brings empathy, warmth and compassion to therapy and takes an individualised approach to each client. See and hear her here!

Monika Kolta is now available to see clients and has a special interest in working with children who experience:• Anxiety/Panic/Phobia• School Refusal• Adjustment Difficulties• Attention Deficit• Depression/Posttraumatic Stress• Behavioural difficulties • Grief and loss• Family changes • Sleep Problems. She is also available to assist adults experiencing a range of difficulties, including parenting challenges, anxiety, depression and adjustment issues. Monika can provide services under Medicare Better Access, Chronic Disease Management Plans (also known as EPC), RTWSA (WorkCover) and Private health funds.

All of this teamwork begins with having a usual GP or General Practice central to your care. We recommend people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would). If they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. 

I’ve repeated this message many times now – hopefully the result is more Bruce Lee and less Frederic Bastiat!

PartridgeGP works with you to help you make your best health decisions, and we won’t back away from being your companion, guide, advisor, and sounding board through your health journey. We pride ourselves on great communication and we’re ready to share our professional skills and knowledge with you. This is only MORE important now, in the time of a global pandemic with a new vaccine on the horizon. The way forward is clear: make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Better, for you. Tomorrow – we’ll introduce all of our new and returning GPs and non GP specialist doctors!

Want more?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Short and Sweet – #thoughtoftheday

The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skilfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended.

General Practice always involves teamwork – Your GP knows a fair bit about a lot, but there are always subject matter experts or specialists. We have Physiotherapy with Rod and Movement Theory, Specialist Urology Services with Dr Nick Brook and the team from EastWest Urology, and Podiatry with Rosie from Foot and Sole Podiatry onsite, but we know so many great practitioners offsite as well.

All of this teamwork begins with having a usual GP or General Practice central to your care. We recommend people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would). If they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. 

I’ve repeated this message many times now – hopefully the result is more Bruce Lee and less Frederic Bastiat!

PartridgeGP works with you to help you make your best health decisions, and we won’t back away from being your companion, guide, advisor, and sounding board through your health journey. We pride ourselves on great communication and we’re ready to share our professional skills and knowledge with you. This is only MORE important now, in the time of a global pandemic with a new vaccine on the horizon. The way forward is clear: make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Better, for you.

Want more?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Disintermediation

Welcome back, hopefully you all enjoyed an awesome Monday and snuck in a sneaky floss after Danielle’s guest post yesterday. Today I’d like to talk about a whopper of a word – disintermediation. This word will win most games of Scrabble but that’s not why I’m bringing it up. It’s not disinformation – this will not be a big long post about #fakenews (I’m smiling here, I hope you are too). Let’s come back to disintermediation in a bit.

General Practice always involves teamwork – Your GP knows a fair bit about a lot, but there are always subject matter experts or specialists. We have Physiotherapy with Rod and Movement Theory, Specialist Urology Services with Dr Nick Brook and the team from EastWest Urology, and Podiatry with Rosie from Foot and Sole Podiatry onsite, but we know so many great practitioners offsite as well.

All of this teamwork begins with having a usual GP or General Practice central to your care. We recommend people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would). If they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. 

Using your regular GP and General Practice regularly and appropriately is a great win for nearly everyone’s general health in Australia. Primary care in Australia is a massive contributor to the general health and well-being of Australians and General Practice and GPs are a massive part of primary care. Primary care is generally the first contact a person has with Australia’s health system. It relates to the treatment of patients who are not admitted to hospital. Primary care can be provided in the home or in community-based settings such as general practices, other private medical practices, community health centres, local government, and non-government service settings, such as Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Services. 

I’ve drawn my line in the sand so let’s dig in a little bit further. Why is your GP and your general practice such a value add to your health? One part of how this magic occurs is through eliminating disintermediation (We got back there eventually). Disintermediation is a reduction in the use of intermediaries between producers and consumers, for example by investing directly in the securities market rather than through a bank, or in a more pertinent example, patients bypassing primary care to directly present to secondary (non GP specialists like cardiologists – heart specialists) or tertiary care (hospital inpatient wards/units). Why is this an issue? After all, we have a fantastic online booking system for appointments at PartridgeGP which works by removing the need for an in hours phone call and conversation. You can sit on the toilet, or a comfier seat, at 8am, 8pm, or any time in between, and make your appointment with your PartridgeGP doctor of choice online. This removes a step you don’t always want to have to go through. It’s great, and allows our lovely front of house team to serve you better.

When the intermediary is not a barrier, but a guide, removing this can be a loss rather than a gain. Rory Sutherland sums it up in the quote below. He’s an advertising professional – I will take more words to make the same point. Having a GP as an intermediary between you and the medical maze/hospital system gives you a companion, a guide, a trusted advisor, and, at the very least, someone to complain to if there is a problem (just remember when you connected to the NBN…)!

I’ve got an anecdote where I was made aware of a patient who entered the hospital system. A smart patient with full private health cover, with more than a little experience in the medical field, who found themselves trying to navigate the medical system unaided. Their GP wasn’t contacted, their personal non-GP specialist wasn’t contacted, and as a result of this they had to undertake some tests at an expense of time, energy, and possible adverse effects to achieve a suboptimal result.

PartridgeGP works with you to help you make your best health decisions, and we won’t back away from being your companion, guide, advisor, and sounding board through your health journey. We pride ourselves on great communication and we’re ready to share our professional skills and knowledge with you. This is only MORE important now, in the time of a global pandemic with a new vaccine on the horizon. The way forward is clear: make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Better, for you.

Want more?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Guest Post: Holy Bleeding Gums, Batman!

General Practice always involves teamwork – Your GP knows a fair bit about a lot, but there are always subject matter experts or specialists. We have Physiotherapy with Rod and Movement Theory, Specialist Urology Services with Dr Nick Brook and the team from EastWest Urology, and Podiatry with Rosie from Foot and Sole Podiatry onsite, but we know so many great practitioners offsite as well. One of these great experts is Danielle Newbery, BOH at Kensington Dental Care, and she has been kind enough to share her expertise with us in this post. Take it away, Danielle!

As a dental practitioner with over 20 years experience, there’s one thing that has always perplexed me about bleeding gums. Why do people think it’s “normal” and ignore it for so long?! If you woke up one morning and your eyes were bleeding, I can guarantee that you’d be in the emergency department or in your GP’s office before 9am. So why do people accept bleeding gums as “normal”?

Is it because the general public isn’t aware of what bleeding gums (gingivitis) can actually mean? Let’s learn together. As soon as one of my patients sits in my dental chair and starts with “I’ve been getting a bit of bleeding when brushing, but that’s all” (or words to that effect), my mind starts ticking. My mental checklist is:

● Is this patient pregnant or breastfeeding?

○ Dental plaque has been shown to significantly increase the risk of preterm labour and low birth weight babies

● Is the patient at risk of diabetes?

○ Gingivitis is an early warning sign of undiagnosed or poorly controlled diabetes

● Is the patient at risk of heart disease or stroke?

○ Patients who have gum disease are 2 to 3 times more likely to have a heart attack or stroke than someone with a healthy mouth

● Is the patient a smoker or taking prescribed/non prescribed substances?

● Could this patient have a vitamin deficiency?

○ Smoking, medication/substance use and vitamin deficiencies are a precursor to a very nasty (and particularly smelly) disease called Acute Necrotising Gingivitis

● Could there be an oral cancer?

○ A bleeding mouth can be a sign of oral cancers, particularly squamous cell carcinomas

What will your dental professional do once you tell them you have bleeding gums?

What will your dental professional do once you tell them you have bleeding gums? Firstly a thorough oral examination must be carried out. Best practice is a full oral cancer examination at every recall, ideally twice a year. They will check your lips, cheeks, gums, tongue, and palate, as well as all of your facial structures for any changes. If they find any unusual lumps, bumps, swelling or lesions you will probably be referred to an Oral Surgeon for assessment. Oral Cancers are not common, but for every hundred suspicious areas we refer, we will see a handful of them return as malignant lesions.

If your gums are bleeding because of a build up of plaque and bacteria, an Oral Health Therapist or Dental Hygienist can see you for a deep clean and oral hygiene instructions. If further or more extensive treatment is needed, you may be referred to a Periodontist who specialises in all things gum related. Pregnant women with heavily bleeding gums will have them thoroughly cleaned and debrided, placed on a 3 month recall and sometimes referred to a Periodontist, depending on the severity. In rare cases a painful growth, called Pregnancy Epulis, may need surgical intervention.

If you see your GP for your bleeding gums, your next stop should be an appropriate dental professional for investigation. Whilst your GP is a fantastic place for your general health, no one knows your mouth like your dental professional. So if you spit out blood after tooth brushing, if your gums are spontaneously bleeding while eating (or just bleeding full stop), please make an appointment with your Dentist, Oral Health Therapist or Dental Hygienist to make sure your bleeding gums are not a warning sign for something sinister.

After all, you wouldn’t ignore bleeding eyeballs, would you?

PartridgeGP works with you to help you make your best health decisions. , and that includes recommending other practitioners to you who care as much as we do. Thanks Danielle! Read more from Danielle right here.

We pride ourselves on great communication and we’re ready to share our professional skills and knowledge with you. This is only MORE important now, in the time of a global pandemic with a new vaccine on the horizon. The way forward is clear: make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Better, for you.

Want more?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Your best Health Insurance is Your GP v2.0

Yesterday we talked about risk. Risk is mitigated by knowledge and experience. I don’t know who said this, but I’m going to take a wild and crazy guess and say it wasn’t from Terry Pratchett’s wonderful Discworld series. This gives us another way to mitigate risk. Insurance.

Risks come at us everyday in our personal and professional lives. We accept that life involves risk. Risk happens.

‘Life is a risky business, no-one gets out alive’

unknown

Health concerns us all, especially now, and we try to improve our health or at least to manage it. Some risks are foreseeable but some are not. These drive our uptake of health insurance. Health insurance is therefore a bit of a ‘grudge purchase’ – we don’t really want to buy it but we don’t want to do without it. Is it worth the money we pay for it? Some high profile voices say no. A past president of the AMA agrees:

A past president of the RACGP concurred:

if you increase the number of GPs by 1 per 10,000 people the death rate goes down 9%

Dr Bastian Seidel; Past President, RACGP

Your health is your wealth, as the saying goes, and you build wealth by spending wisely.

Some tests, treatments and procedures provide little benefit. And in some cases, they may even cause harm.
Use the 5 questions to make sure you end up with the right amount of care — not too much and not too little.

Do I really need this test, treatment or procedure?

Tests may help you and your doctor or other health care provider determine the problem. Treatments, such as medicines, and procedures may help to treat it.

What are the risks?

Will there be side effects to the test or treatment? What are the chances of getting results that aren’t accurate? Could that lead to more testing, additional treatments or another procedure?

Are there simpler, safer options?

Are there alternative options to treatment that could work. Lifestyle changes, such as eating healthier foods or exercising more, can be safe and effective options.

What happens if I don’t do anything?

Ask if your condition might get worse — or better — if you don’t have the test, treatment or procedure right away.

What are the costs?

Costs can be financial, emotional or a cost of your time. Where there is a cost to the community, is the cost reasonable or is there a cheaper alternative?

Your GP can be a great ally in navigating through the health system, a great support for you in times of need, and a great investment in your health. 

“Patients whose care is well managed and coordinated by their usual GP are less likely to cost the health system more in the long run because their GP-coordinated care will keep them out of hospital.

“Supporting general practice to continue managing these patients – who are growing in number each year – is an investment in health care that can help make the health system more sustainable.”

Past AMA President, A/Prof Brian Owler

PartridgeGP works with you to help you make your best health decisions. We pride ourselves on great communication and we’re ready to share our professional skills and knowledge with you. This is only MORE important now, in the time of a global pandemic with a new vaccine on the horizon. The way forward is clear: make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Better, for you.

Want more?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Risk

In 1990 I watched Graham Gooch of England make 333 and 123 in a Test Match against India at Lord’s. It was a different time and a different country. Gooch looked decidedly unathletic (although apparently a fitness fanatic) and I certainly don’t remember the Indian pace attack as anything like the current potent crew. As Gooch approached his three hundredth run, the BBC cut to a horse race showing the usual tin ear of public broadcasters. It was compelling but hadn’t quite reached exciting. For those of you not baptised into the religion of Test Cricket, simply put, one fellow throws a small hard leather ball in a special way (bowling) at some wooden poles (the wickets) from a distance of 22 yards (the pitch) while another fellow (the batsman) uses a wooden club (bat) to prevent this. Other fellows stand around to catch or intercept the ball, and also provide commentary on the batsman’s skill, character, and parentage.

I moved to Australia and one of the instant upgrades was supporting the Australian cricket team. Staying up in 1995 to listen to Steve Waugh wearing bouncer after bouncer after bouncer as Australia finally rolled the West Indies in their own backyard was incredibly exciting. Part of that excitement was risk. The players had arm/chest guards, gloves, pads, boxes, helmets, and increasingly large bats but the spectacle and danger of confronting 140-150 kilometre missiles was enthralling.

It had a lot of value for the players involved and for the audiences in the West Indies, Australia, and around the world. The West Indies are a collection of independent island countries who only come together as the West Indies for cricket. Much the same could be said about Australia and it’s Federation of States (especially in light of recent border shenanigans). Australia had been planning this assault for years. The West Indies were coming off a long period of world domination and were raging against the dying of the light as their great players aged.

Fast forwarding again, I went back to England in 2013 to watch the Australian team play England at Lord’s. One of the Australian players to watch was a star of the future – Phillip Hughes. He didn’t have the most auspicious day at Lord’s but certainly looked a player of the future. It was to be his final Test Match. Hughes was a short man, like many of the great batsmen, and so had become accustomed to bowlers aiming at his chest and head. He was an accomplished player of this style of (short pitched) bowling. Sadly, in 2014, Hughes was batting in a State game and despite all of his protective apparel, was hit in the neck by a short pitched ball. He was incredibly unlucky to be hit in the neck in precisely the wrong spot. Wikipedia recounts:

causing a vertebral artery dissection that led to a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The Australian team doctor, Peter Brukner, noted that only 100 such cases had ever been reported, with “only one case reported as a result of a cricket ball”

The risk that made the matches in the West Indies so enthralling and the risk that added value to that spectacle was the same risk that ended with Phil Hughes’ death. Certainly players, spectators, and officials thought long and hard about this risk afterwards. As a result of this we now have something called a stem guard which is a little bit of plastic that protects that very vulnerable area of the neck. Hopefully this particular type of injury will never happen again with these consequences. The amount of short pitched bowling decreased, for a while, but then returned to previous levels (perhaps regressed to the mean). Then, something else happened. 

Today we can see players like Neil Wagner eulogised for bowling into the batsman’s armpit, shoulder, and head. This line of attack into the batsman’s blind spot can hit them, hurt them, or just put them off their game. Wagner recently won a Test Match for his country like this (with two broken toes).

“Neil Wagner was outstanding,” Stead said. “I’m not sure there are too many individuals that could do what he did in that Test match.

Further statistics during the current Australia vs India test series show a clear advantage gained by short pitched bowling. Furthermore, almost uniquely in top level sport, this involves the some of one team doing what they do best against some of the other team doing what they do worst (bowlers bowling at bowlers batting).  Is this too much risk and who makes this decision and on what basis?

This conundrum – the risk of injury and death versus the benefits of economic value resulting from the spectacle – mirrors some situations we face in medicine and life:

Lockdowns vs Targeted Protection

New Vaccines vs New Viruses

Medication vs Lifestyle

I don’t have a universal answer for this, in cricket, life, or in medicine. I firmly believe that we should have these conversations and come to answers that are transparent and workable. From the macro level in Australia and the world to the micro level in the consult room, I think this is the way we should manage risk. We should be mindful of risk in all of our consultations and all of our dealings with patients. If you would like to be part of a team that can afford and prioritise the time taken to consider risk in each and every consultation and dealing then the way forward is clear: make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200 or…

here are the steps!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

VoteGP | RACGP | AMA

Did you know it is election season? It’s almost time to decide on the leadership teams that the RACGP and AMA will have moving forwards in these uncertain days.

 

First, the RACGP.

 

Three GPs have thrown their hats into the ring so far – I wish them all the best of luck, a fair hearing, and look forward to the RACGP elections as a beacon of probity and ethical behaviour rarely seen in our country’s elections.

Election info here

Voting info here

 

DR KAREN PRICE

 

DR CHRIS IRWIN

 

DR AYMAN SHENOUDA

 

Vote! The turn out for the RACGP elections is quite small (why?) and so your vote really does count. Take the time to be informed and again, vote!

 

Now, the AMA.

 

National Conference 1 August

 

At the recent Federal AMA Annual General Meeting the Association’s Constitution was amended to authorise the AMA National Conference to be held on-line. The AMA National Conference, at which election of a new Federal President and Vice President will be conducted, will be held by Zoom video conference from 10am AEST on Saturday 1 August 2020.

 

Nominations for President and Vice President are now open. Nominations can be made by way of email to secgen@ama.com.au. Nominations close at 5pm AEST on Friday 17 July.

 

The AMA has adopted a target of 40% women, 40% men, and 20% flexible for all AMA Councils, Committees and Boards, with a gender diversity target of women holding 50% of Federal AMA representative positions overall by 2021. AMA members are invited to help achieve these targets. These targets will particularly inform the finalisation of the expression of interest assessment for uncontested delegate positions.

 

Of course, if you want to vote for a great General Practice, supporting great GPs to serve their patients, with wonderful services and facilities…the choice is clear!

 

PartridgeGP

 

Divided, the Empire must unite…

Romance of the Three Kingdoms is
one of China’s four Great Classical Novels. The title of this blog post is more fully:

The empire, long divided, must unite; long united, must divide. Thus it has ever been.

PartridgeGP is based on a triple promise that we will be great for our patients and our community, GPs and our staff, and for the owners and the practice. Further, we will provide a comprehensive, professional, empowering, and sustainable service at all times.

Our friendly neighbourhood pharmacist sent this to me (see below). He was a little worried about the threat to his full service pharmacy and also to great General Practice.

Hmmmm

Now different companies will have different service offerings at different levels of the market. Think Porsche and Hyundai. Both very acceptable to different groups. Maybe even acceptable to the same group at different times. I’m not sure they are competitors.

I put my thoughts down here:

Upon reflection…

So keep playing to your strengths, keep doing your best, and unite not divide.

If you want to join a team that’s here to guide and help our valued patients, give Dr Nick Tellis or Dr Nick Mouktaroudis a call at PartridgeGP on 8295 3200!

PartridgeGP | Telehealth | COVID19 | Physical Examination

We all want to provide great general practice care. Most of this comes from time, curiosity, and interest in our patients. When we turn our attention and medical skills to their problems and issues we do better work.

Physical examination has been around since antiquity and is a useful adjunct to taking a great history. Much like over investigating, physical examination is not always needed.

General practice is so much more than compliance and paperwork.

So much can be pared away to reveal the essence of what we do.

In the time of #COVID19, perhaps we can chip away to reveal our statues of David rather than be inflexible blocks of government marble.

More ideas here!

Another set of thoughts, better expressed…

It’s time for emergency physicians to put away our stethoscopes

By Jeremy Samuel Faust

Since 1986, federal law has mandated that any patient requesting emergency medical care must be evaluated by a physician to assess for any threatening conditions. The law, often referred to as the “anti-dumping law,” requires that physicians perform a medical screening evaluation, including a physical examination.

Over time, the interpretation of this mandate has slowly expanded, not by law so much as by custom. This is why emergency rooms have become our nation’s safety net for care. Despite increasing popularity of urgent-care clinics and telehealth, many patients who could have safely been cared for elsewhere still end up in emergency rooms.

While many of us embrace that mission with pride, it is dangerous and wasteful in the coronavirus pandemic. We need to course-correct to keep everyone safe. Exposing patients to emergency rooms is now far riskier than it was before. In turn, health-care workers must assume that all patients are infected. This forces us to blow through personal protective equipment that we desperately need so that we do not become infected ourselves.

Over the past few decades, we have learned that many, if not most, of our physical examination maneuvers provide little reliable information. In most cases, the information we need can be obtained simply by interviewing patients. But old habits die hard, and patients seem to love our stethoscopes. In our current situation, that simply won’t do.

We need the federal government to allow us to perform medical screening exams via video or through glass doors, even for patients entering emergency rooms. The removal of the requirement that we evaluate every patient by hand will save resources and keep everyone safer.

In recent meetings and phone calls with stakeholders, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has signaled that it is seriously considering making this change. But it has not materialized, and time is of the essence. The moment to act is now.

Jeremy Samuel Faust is an emergency physician at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in the Division of Health Policy and Public Health, and an instructor at Harvard Medical School.

Telemedicine | RACGP | PartridgeGP

The RACGP SA&NT in conjunction with SA Health and a local panel of presenters, will be presenting a webinar update on Telemedicine, discussing tips and tricks related to undertaking telehealth in your practice.

 

WATCH HERE

 

 

Topics to be covered:

·         Discussing the role of telehealth and the consent process

·         New MBS item numbers

·         Registrars working remotely

·         Undertaking paperwork when working remotely

·         E-prescribing Legislation

·         Combining telehealth with face to face consults

·         Rolling Q&A

Date:  Thursday, 16 April 2020

Time: 6.30-7.30 pm

Cost: FREE

Register in advance for this webinar:

https://racgp.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_eGyo0yuBR-iLE0Pvh6YehA

Registrations close 5pm Thursday 16 April 2020.

Presenters:

Dr Emily Kirkpatrick – Deputy Chair, RACGP SA&NT & SA Health COVID-19 GP Liaison Team

Dr Daniel Byrne – SA Health COVID-19 GP Liaison Team

Dr Alvin Chua – RACGP SA&NT Council member

Dr Nicholas Tellis – GP, Owner PartridgeGP