Happy Mindset Monday

Mondays are no different to Fridays except in your perception. How many of you think TGI Monday? How would Mondays be different if you did?

Remember the thoughts from previous posts:

be mindful as to the type of content you consume – the news you watch, the things you read

be mindful as to the people you associate with – you are the average of the five people you spend most time with

be mindful in regard to diet and exercise, get that anchoring going

Make a great start to Monday, the week, the month, and your year! (are you humming the Friends theme yet?) You can make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

You know the drill!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

idea sex

First up – there is no sex in this blog post! Now that only two of you are left, let’s crack on. Lifelong learning is a great thing. For doctors as a group and for GPs in particular, a lack of curiosity is terrible. Listen and learn – the patient will tell you their story, and often the diagnosis. The average doctor interrupts the patient in less than a minute. Don’t aspire to be average.

Patients appreciate it when their GP takes the time to listen to them. They like it. Patients don’t sue doctors they like AND taking that time improves your diagnostic skills. If you listen, you learn, and the more you learn, the more you earn. We see that while good medicine is not the entirety of good business, it’s certainly a component (but an essential one for us at PartridgeGP). Why not anchor listening and learning together?

What is anchoring? James Clear, in his excellent book Atomic Habits, calls it habit stacking but credits the concept to BJ Fogg. It is linking a new habit to an old one, with the old habit acting as an anchor that keeps the new habit in place. If we combine listening and learning in the modern age, we get the podcast (For those that don’t know,a podcast is a digital audio file made available on the internet for downloading to a computer or mobile device, typically available as a series, new instalments of which can be received by subscribers automatically). These are a fantastic way of learning while you do something else. Whether it’s the washing, the shopping, driving to work, or even getting to sleep, your chosen podcast app can deliver some learning gold to you. I like listening to most things at 1.5 times speed – because who wants to learn slowly! I use Google Podcasts or Castbox (these do 95%+ of what I want a podcast app to do).

Now, you are being exposed to ideas every day. These ideas can get together in your head, and have idea sex. Of course, idea sex can lead to idea babies. Innovation, creativity, even wisdom can be born from this approach. For those that are a bit disappointed by the rather tame appearance of sex in this post, I give you an alternative wording. Consuming better content, as per the theory of maximum taste, will improve your cognitive foundation and you’ll start connecting ideas across books and disciplines. You will develop deep fluency. I like the idea sex and idea babies, if you want more of the alternative wording, hit up the Farnam Street Blog (highly recommended).

I’ve started doubly anchoring my podcast listening by replacing music during my running. I have found that rather than high energy dance music, an informative podcast improves my time and cadence during a run! I look forward to reporting on further success with this in a future post. Perhaps I will develop a small amount of wit and wisdom as I run.

Good luck with lifelong learning and making those mental connections that lead to wit and wisdom. You can do this in your personal and professional interactions as well as in your learning – and that can start with your GP! You can make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

You can continue the process further!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Breached as, bro

Once upon a time, as all the oldest stories start, data was kept in peoples brains. This data wasn’t clearly visible and could only be accessed via direct download from the source. The person had to tell you what was in their brain. This is how the oldest stories were passed on, with an oral tradition. There were secrets. Some things were private. There was value in this. Secrets have always been valuable – and many methods have been tried to extract this value, from persuasion, coercion, interrogation, and worse. Lots of secrets equals big value equals a big incentive to try some of these methods. That said, it’s a lot harder to use these methods to find a lot of little secrets in a lot of places, when you don’t really know where to look.

What if someone took a lot of secrets, including your secrets? What if that someone took those secrets and put them all in the same place? Is this sounding familiar? What we have in this situation is motive (lots of valuable secrets – data), opportunity (you know where it is – a big database), and then all you need is the means…

We all know that more mistakes can be attributed to stupidity than malice and I suspect poor systems have led to the situation below. Big health databases are big targets, and data breaches, where your data, your secrets, become public, are becoming more and more common. One big database belongs to Ambulance Tasmania.

The private details of every Tasmanian who has called an ambulance since November last year have been published online by a third party in a list still updating each time paramedics are dispatched.

Key points:

  • Ambulance Tasmania uses a paging system in initial communications between the dispatch team and paramedics on the ground
  • Pager messages dating back to November have been uploaded to a website, which is still live and continually updating
  • The health union has described the data dump as “horrific”

The breach of Ambulance Tasmania’s paging system has been described as “horrific” by the Health and Community Services Union, which has suggested the data dump could leave the Government open to litigation.

The biggest health database in this country is MyHealthRecord. The website states that ‘My Health Record lets you control your health information securely, in one place. This means your important health information is available when and where it’s needed, including in an emergency’. There are some issues with this – many hospitals and health service providers neither use nor access MyHealthRecord and, as I’ve said above, big databases have a big target on them. Hackers and criminals see this target. So do governments and non-criminals.

2018 saw the Federal Government quietly release its long-awaited framework for secondary use of information contained within the my health record. It was controversial. The release of the framework to guide the secondary use of My Health Record (MyHR) system data came just months before the participation rules for the Australian national health record change from opt-in to opt-out. Consent for secondary use is implied if consumers don’t opt out of the MyHR. In other words, people need to take action if they don’t want their health data to be used for purposes other than direct clinical care.

What does this all mean? For patients and individuals it means being mindful about your data. Only give what you need to give, for good reason, and consider time limits and limiting further usage of your data for unconnected reasons.

For doctors, consider clinically appropriate data entry – never forget who you serve and why, and work in and with good practices and practitioners who will take the same care and attention with patients data as you do.

For practices, good policies and solid hardware and software solutions are the key!

For a little bit of further reading:

John Stronner is a guru in this area – a Certified Data Protection Officer, and CEO of Loftus Technology Group. I had the pleasure and privilege of speaking after him on a recent podcast from This Pathological Life! Another podcast I found super useful was the story of the white hat hacker turned protector, Bastien Treptel of the CTRL Group.

Be mindful with your data and your health – we can help with both (with your medical data at least!). Just one little example of how your data can help you is here, where I explain how your GP can upload your immunisation details to MyHealthRecord, allowing you to prove your vaccination status – super important in 2021! You can make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Where to now?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Qi at Partridge Street General Practice

We’ve just celebrated the Chinese New Year – the Year of the Dog. People born in Dog years display loyalty and honesty amongst many other good qualities. However it is said that they can also be critical – maybe overly so. Segueing to another Chinese concept, we meet Qi, the vital life force that flows through the body. Let’s put these together.

 

 

 

A wise man once told me that the three pillars (the vital life force) of general practice are quality, service, and finance. All three of these come together in the form of the Practice Incentive Payments (PIP) scheme. You can read about this here but in summary Accredited General Practices are paid amounts of money for reaching certain quality measures. These include planning the management of a proportion of patients with diabetes and asthma, and ensuring women are screened for cervical cancer. There are also Incentive Payments for managing aged care and quality in prescribing.

 

 

 

 

These payments were due for a change on May 1st 2018. Were they promoting the vital life force of General Practice, were they tick box exercises for busy GPs, or were they overly critical of General Practice, not focusing on true quality? Enter QI – Quality Improvement. Rather than Qi, QI may be an altogether different beast.

 

 

But!

 

 

The Department of Health has confirmed that the Practice Incentive Program Quality Improvement Incentive will now occur from 1 May 2019.

 

 

From their press release:

 

 

The Practice Incentive Program (PIP) has been a key driver in quality care in the general practice sector and the PIP QI Incentive will continue to build on this important work, further strengthening quality improvement in primary health care. The additional 12 months will enable the Department, with the support and advice from PIPAG, to ensure that any implementation issues are identified and addressed and that general practices have adequate opportunity to prepare. It will also allow the Department to continue to consult with stakeholders on refining the design of the PIP QI Incentive.

 

The changed time frame will mean that the following five incentives which were to cease on 1 May 2018, will now continue through to 30 April 2019.

 

 

The five incentives are:

Asthma Incentive

Quality Prescribing Incentive

Cervical Screening Incentive

Diabetes Incentive

General Practitioner Aged Care Access Incentive

 

The six PIP Incentives that continue to remain unchanged are:

eHealth Incentive

After Hours Incentive

Rural Loading Incentive

Teaching Payment

Indigenous Health Incentive

Procedural General Practitioner Payment

 

 

What next? Will the new QI beast be reflective of quality in General Practice? Will the measures align with what we as General Practitioners believe is high quality Great General Practice care? Or will it aptly be launched in the Chinese Year of the Pig in 2019?

 

For what it’s worth, here are my measurements of quality, service, and finance in General Practice – the Qi of GP:

 

 

Quality – Time and Presence with Our Valued Patients

 

Service – Charging a private fee to those who can pay, allowing us to be charitable to those who cannot

 

Finance – Running Practices efficiently and well, with clinicians as owners steering the course of patient centred practices.

 

 

I would love to hear other views on this. We are all professionals or patients or both and we can always improve. Let me know here on the blog (or on our website) – or, if you’re a GP, on the fantastic GPDU FB Group – where GPs are invited to a festival of education and collegiality (#FOAMed – #GPDU18) May 30 – June 1! My last quality ltip – for personally better Qi – is below!

 

Get a Great GP!

(Here’s some we made earlier)

Dr Nick Tellis

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Gareth’s Cycle of Care

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Katherine Astill 1

We look forward to seeing you soon!