Your best Health Insurance is Your GP v2.0

Yesterday we talked about risk. Risk is mitigated by knowledge and experience. I don’t know who said this, but I’m going to take a wild and crazy guess and say it wasn’t from Terry Pratchett’s wonderful Discworld series. This gives us another way to mitigate risk. Insurance.

Risks come at us everyday in our personal and professional lives. We accept that life involves risk. Risk happens.

‘Life is a risky business, no-one gets out alive’

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Health concerns us all, especially now, and we try to improve our health or at least to manage it. Some risks are foreseeable but some are not. These drive our uptake of health insurance. Health insurance is therefore a bit of a ‘grudge purchase’ – we don’t really want to buy it but we don’t want to do without it. Is it worth the money we pay for it? Some high profile voices say no. A past president of the AMA agrees:

A past president of the RACGP concurred:

if you increase the number of GPs by 1 per 10,000 people the death rate goes down 9%

Dr Bastian Seidel; Past President, RACGP

Your health is your wealth, as the saying goes, and you build wealth by spending wisely.

Some tests, treatments and procedures provide little benefit. And in some cases, they may even cause harm.
Use the 5 questions to make sure you end up with the right amount of care — not too much and not too little.

Do I really need this test, treatment or procedure?

Tests may help you and your doctor or other health care provider determine the problem. Treatments, such as medicines, and procedures may help to treat it.

What are the risks?

Will there be side effects to the test or treatment? What are the chances of getting results that aren’t accurate? Could that lead to more testing, additional treatments or another procedure?

Are there simpler, safer options?

Are there alternative options to treatment that could work. Lifestyle changes, such as eating healthier foods or exercising more, can be safe and effective options.

What happens if I don’t do anything?

Ask if your condition might get worse — or better — if you don’t have the test, treatment or procedure right away.

What are the costs?

Costs can be financial, emotional or a cost of your time. Where there is a cost to the community, is the cost reasonable or is there a cheaper alternative?

Your GP can be a great ally in navigating through the health system, a great support for you in times of need, and a great investment in your health. 

“Patients whose care is well managed and coordinated by their usual GP are less likely to cost the health system more in the long run because their GP-coordinated care will keep them out of hospital.

“Supporting general practice to continue managing these patients – who are growing in number each year – is an investment in health care that can help make the health system more sustainable.”

Past AMA President, A/Prof Brian Owler

PartridgeGP works with you to help you make your best health decisions. We pride ourselves on great communication and we’re ready to share our professional skills and knowledge with you. This is only MORE important now, in the time of a global pandemic with a new vaccine on the horizon. The way forward is clear: make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Better, for you.

Want more?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Risk

In 1990 I watched Graham Gooch of England make 333 and 123 in a Test Match against India at Lord’s. It was a different time and a different country. Gooch looked decidedly unathletic (although apparently a fitness fanatic) and I certainly don’t remember the Indian pace attack as anything like the current potent crew. As Gooch approached his three hundredth run, the BBC cut to a horse race showing the usual tin ear of public broadcasters. It was compelling but hadn’t quite reached exciting. For those of you not baptised into the religion of Test Cricket, simply put, one fellow throws a small hard leather ball in a special way (bowling) at some wooden poles (the wickets) from a distance of 22 yards (the pitch) while another fellow (the batsman) uses a wooden club (bat) to prevent this. Other fellows stand around to catch or intercept the ball, and also provide commentary on the batsman’s skill, character, and parentage.

I moved to Australia and one of the instant upgrades was supporting the Australian cricket team. Staying up in 1995 to listen to Steve Waugh wearing bouncer after bouncer after bouncer as Australia finally rolled the West Indies in their own backyard was incredibly exciting. Part of that excitement was risk. The players had arm/chest guards, gloves, pads, boxes, helmets, and increasingly large bats but the spectacle and danger of confronting 140-150 kilometre missiles was enthralling.

It had a lot of value for the players involved and for the audiences in the West Indies, Australia, and around the world. The West Indies are a collection of independent island countries who only come together as the West Indies for cricket. Much the same could be said about Australia and it’s Federation of States (especially in light of recent border shenanigans). Australia had been planning this assault for years. The West Indies were coming off a long period of world domination and were raging against the dying of the light as their great players aged.

Fast forwarding again, I went back to England in 2013 to watch the Australian team play England at Lord’s. One of the Australian players to watch was a star of the future – Phillip Hughes. He didn’t have the most auspicious day at Lord’s but certainly looked a player of the future. It was to be his final Test Match. Hughes was a short man, like many of the great batsmen, and so had become accustomed to bowlers aiming at his chest and head. He was an accomplished player of this style of (short pitched) bowling. Sadly, in 2014, Hughes was batting in a State game and despite all of his protective apparel, was hit in the neck by a short pitched ball. He was incredibly unlucky to be hit in the neck in precisely the wrong spot. Wikipedia recounts:

causing a vertebral artery dissection that led to a subarachnoid haemorrhage. The Australian team doctor, Peter Brukner, noted that only 100 such cases had ever been reported, with “only one case reported as a result of a cricket ball”

The risk that made the matches in the West Indies so enthralling and the risk that added value to that spectacle was the same risk that ended with Phil Hughes’ death. Certainly players, spectators, and officials thought long and hard about this risk afterwards. As a result of this we now have something called a stem guard which is a little bit of plastic that protects that very vulnerable area of the neck. Hopefully this particular type of injury will never happen again with these consequences. The amount of short pitched bowling decreased, for a while, but then returned to previous levels (perhaps regressed to the mean). Then, something else happened. 

Today we can see players like Neil Wagner eulogised for bowling into the batsman’s armpit, shoulder, and head. This line of attack into the batsman’s blind spot can hit them, hurt them, or just put them off their game. Wagner recently won a Test Match for his country like this (with two broken toes).

“Neil Wagner was outstanding,” Stead said. “I’m not sure there are too many individuals that could do what he did in that Test match.

Further statistics during the current Australia vs India test series show a clear advantage gained by short pitched bowling. Furthermore, almost uniquely in top level sport, this involves the some of one team doing what they do best against some of the other team doing what they do worst (bowlers bowling at bowlers batting).  Is this too much risk and who makes this decision and on what basis?

This conundrum – the risk of injury and death versus the benefits of economic value resulting from the spectacle – mirrors some situations we face in medicine and life:

Lockdowns vs Targeted Protection

New Vaccines vs New Viruses

Medication vs Lifestyle

I don’t have a universal answer for this, in cricket, life, or in medicine. I firmly believe that we should have these conversations and come to answers that are transparent and workable. From the macro level in Australia and the world to the micro level in the consult room, I think this is the way we should manage risk. We should be mindful of risk in all of our consultations and all of our dealings with patients. If you would like to be part of a team that can afford and prioritise the time taken to consider risk in each and every consultation and dealing then the way forward is clear: make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200 or…

here are the steps!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Long Levers

The human body has levers, and these are formed from bones, joints and muscles.

A lever consists of:

  • a rigid structure (bone)
  • a force acting upon it (muscle) to produce a turning movement
  • a fulcrum which is a fixed point (joint)
  • a load or resistance that is placed on the rigid structure (weight of body part being moved and anything that it is carrying)

Through these we can perform tasks and functions. Athletes are praised for having long levers – making them faster and stronger. When we look at an organisation we also have levers. We can pull on these to perform functions. Archimedes famously said give me a lever long enough and a place to stand and I will move the world.

We can use short or long levers to achieve a result. A short lever is, well, short, and can be constructed quickly. It doesn’t move a lot. It can be thought of as a short term lever, something made with little care and attention, designed to get a quick result. In Game Theory, you could play short term games with these short levers. Game Theory is a theoretical framework for conceiving social situations among competing players. In some respects, it is the science of strategy, or at least the optimal decision-making of independent and competing actors in a strategic setting.

Imagine a fast food truck or van. It’s on wheels so if you serve a bad meal or bad service you can just move and go somewhere else. It doesn’t really matter what it does to your reputation and people know this instinctively. Now imagine the perceived or anticipated quality of the food from a bricks and mortar store or restaurant. People assume this will be better than they would get from a street vendor or food truck purely because that shop or restaurant cannot move to a new area after serving a bad meal or providing bad service. In Game Theory, these businesses are playing a long term or repeat game. In this example, this is a long lever. These longer levers are, again, longer, and take longer to build. Long levers result in big movements.

In medicine we can pull short levers to get an immediate result. If you come in with high blood pressure we can prescribe a pill and almost certainly this will lower your blood pressure – if you took it. Sometimes you don’t want to take it; you’re not convinced that it’s a good idea or you don’t understand why or you don’t trust the person giving you that advice. When your GP is playing a long or repeat game they are building a relationship with you, a therapeutic relationship built on trust that takes time. This is a longer lever and with that you can achieve more movement. Maybe you take the pill to get a result. Maybe it allows your GP to work with you to undertake long-term strategies such as diet, exercise, and lifestyle modification which take a long time to bed in but which provide great rewards.

PartridgeGP wants to build these long-term therapeutic trusting relationships. These long levers are as valuable in medical practice as they are in a professional athlete. We really treasure them and our patients and that’s our thought of the day. To take the first steps towards this, make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Where to from here?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Welcoming Dr Nick Brook and the EastWestUrology Team to PartridgeGP

PartridgeGP is proud to welcome Dr Nick Brook and the EastWestUrology Team to our premises at 670 Anzac Highway! Another Dr Nick I hear you say – this Dr Nick is a specialist urologist: Urology is the surgical and medical management of problems of the male and female urinary system, and male reproductive system. There is some overlap with other areas of medicine and surgery, and sometimes joint care is required.

Dr Nick is joined by Dr Dan Spernat, Dr Mark Lloyd, and Urology Nurse Specialist Louise, to provide a comprehensive service from PartridgeGP, for both males and females with urological (bladder and kidney and prostate) issues.

A/Prof Nick Brook is a consultant urologist with private practice at Calvary North Adelaide and Ashford Hospitals. Nick consults at North Adelaide, the Hills, and the South Coast, and undertakes Day Case lists at Glenelg and Seaford. He holds appointments at the Royal Adelaide Hospital (senior staff specialist) and at the University of Adelaide (Associate Professor in Surgery).

Nick undertook a urological cancer fellowship at the Princess Alexandra Hospital in Brisbane from 2008-2009, and was appointed as a consultant in Adelaide in 2009. He holds Fellowships of both the UK (FRCS Urol) and Australasian (FRACS Urol) Colleges of Surgeons, a Doctor of Medicine higher degree by research (MD) and has extensive basic science training (Bachelor of Science and Master of Science degrees).

He is trained in all aspects of adult urology and has a special interest in urological cancers. He has wide experience in the management of prostate, kidney, bladder and testicular cancer, including minimally invasive robotic surgery for prostate and kidney cancer. Nick recently spent a six-month, full-time sabbatical clinical fellowship in Europe undertaking advanced robotic prostate and kidney surgery.

Nick is also a high-volume robotic and open cancer surgeon, and performs high and low dose rate brachytherapy for prostate cancer, so is able to offer patients all current options for urology cancer treatment.

His research interests encompass novel treatments for prostate and kidney cancer, and he is the lead urologist on a number of clinical trials based at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. He has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals, is the Director of Urological Cancer at the RAH Urology department, and is Chair of the urological cancer multidisciplinary team there.

Dr Nick Brook and the EastWestUrology Team are here to help you at PartridgeGP awith all of your specialist urological needs, including, but not limited to, the issues below…

prostate problems

incontinence/flow/dribbling problems

prostate cancer

vasectomies

vasectomy reversal

kidney stones

You can make your appointments with them right here – or call our friendly reception team on 0882953200, or contact EastWestUrology at the details below:

QE Specialist Centre, 35 Woodville Road,
Woodville South, SA 5011

Tel: 08 7223 2389
Mobile: 08 7223 2389
Fax: 8243 2766
Email: info@qespecialistcentre.com.au

Where to from here?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Welcoming Dr Elias Salagaras to PartridgeGP

PartridgeGP is proud to welcome Dr Elias Salagaras to our team!

Dr Elias Salagaras completed his medical training through the University of Adelaide in 2017. He is enthusiastic about child health, having completed rotations at the Women’s and Children’s Hospital. He was also worked throughout the Central Adelaide Local Health Network, and the Whyalla Hospital. He is looking forward to bringing all of this recent knowledge to his specialist GP training!

He will kick off the new year with a great mindset and our Great Team here at PartridgeGP!

Dr Elias is here to help you at PartridgeGP as Your GP! He is available to help you with all of your General Practice needs from the start of February 2021 and you can make your appointment with him conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 0882953200.

All of our doctors here at PartridgeGP are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this ‘Registrars’) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and you can see more about what this involves here. Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars.

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at PartridgeGP with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

Where to from here?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

I like steak

I like steak. It tastes good, it looks good, and I think it is good for you (like everything, everything in moderation). My preferred steak is grass fed, thickly cut, with a generous fat content, well marbled, and cooked with love, care, and attention. Cattle are meant to graze on pasture, not corn, and not soy. I am listed on Low Carb Down Under and am very happy to give medical advice on medical issues to do with Low Carb, Healthy Fat (LCHF) eating and diet. You can read some of my previous posts on this here, here, and here.

I wrote earlier this week about the theory of maximum taste, where our minds are defined by their upper limits; the best content they are used to consuming regularly. Whether it is the content you read, the food you eat, or the company you keep, better quality improves you and your life. To this end, I like to source good quality steak. This requires time, effort, energy, and investment. I know my local butchers well. They know me. They will often have exactly what I want (sometimes knowing what I want better than I do) and will have it packaged up for me and ready to go in far less time than others would. This is very valuable to me. I liken this to the service we provide at PartridgeGP – high quality, relational, and proactive. We add value.

Now, all this service and value comes at a cost. My local butcher is a little bit more expensive than my local supermarket. They don’t open from dawn until midnight. They don’t open on a Sunday, or even late on a Saturday afternoon. I have to plan ahead; if I don’t organise myself during opening hours, I sometimes find myself steakless. Thankfully, there is a solution to this with my local supermarket being open for the vast majority of the week. They always have steak and I can grab some whenever. It’s cheaper, it’s generally not grass fed, or well marbled, or thick, and usually has supermodel amounts of fat. I am very grateful that my local supermarket exists. They provide a different level of service and value. I shop there far less often than at my local butcher but convenience is a virtue all of it’s own. I liken this to the value proposition from some other medical providers.

Just like with your food, your reading, and the company you keep, pick your medical care mindfully in 2021, and invest that time, effort and energy into your health. You can make your appointment with us conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 82953200.

Where to from here?

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

For everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it. Call PartridgeGP on 82953200 or make an appointment online here.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Photo by Miguel u00c1. Padriu00f1u00e1n on Pexels.com

If you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat with us as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Welcoming Dr Katherine Astill back to PartridgeGP…again!

PartridgeGP is proud to welcome Dr Katherine Astill back to our team!

Dr Katherine Astill commenced her specialist General Practice training with PartridgeGP in August 2017, returned in August 2019, and is back again from February 2021! She graduated with a Bachelor of Physiotherapy from the University of South Australia in 2009 and furthered her education with a Bachelor of Medicine and Surgery from Deakin University in 2013. After holding positions with the Muscular Dystrophy Association and the Women’s and Children’s Hospital, she decided to specialise in General Practice, with a special interest in Women’s and Children’s Health completing her Diploma of Child Health in 2016.

Dr Katherine has a passion for holistic care and preventative health. She is also a strong advocate for a plant based diet and healthy lifestyle and looks forward to helping people with both of these.

She loves the local Glenelg area and is keen to hit the ground running with the rest of our Great Team here at PartridgeGP!

Dr Katherine is here to help you at PartridgeGP as Your GP! She is available to help you with all of your General Practice needs from the start of February 2021 and you can make your appointment with her conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 0882953200.

All of our doctors here at PartridgeGP are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this ‘Registrars’) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and you can see more about what this involves here. Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars.

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at PartridgeGP with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

Where to from here?

Firstly, for everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Secondly, if you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Thirdly, if you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Maximum Taste

There’s a theory of maximum taste. It’s January 2021 and perhaps you’re thinking you know where this is going, just another doctor telling you to eat less, eat better, and exercise more. Well, those are all true, and if you’d like to read more, look here, here, and here.

It’s better to show than tell, so I look forward to showing you progress on my own diet and exercise journey in 2021. Watch this space!

Back to that theory. The theory of maximum taste says that each person’s mind is defined by its upper limit – the best that it habitually consumes and is capable of consuming. It follows that we should feed our minds appropriately. David Brooks takes this to mean we should read more, more reflectively, and more challenging material. I’d like to take this further. 

Many of us speak and listen more and faster than we read. We are the average of the five people we spend most time around. Consuming better content, being around better people, having better conversations – these are all things we can do to improve our upper limits. 

So where to from here?

Firstly, for everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Secondly, if you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Thirdly, if you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Welcoming Dr Ciara Peddell to PartridgeGP

PartridgeGP is proud to welcome Dr Ciara Peddell to our team!

Dr Ciara Peddell completed her medical training at the University of Tasmania in 2014. Since then she has worked in hospitals and GP practices in Townsville and Brisbane. She completed the Diploma of Child Health in 2017 through the University of Sydney and received her RACGP fellowship in 2019. Dr Ciara is looking forward to moving to Adelaide in January to start her work at Partridge GP.  

Dr Ciara’s special interests include paediatrics (kids health), preventative health and she is trained in the insertion and removal of the implanon contraceptive device.

Dr Ciara is here to help you at PartridgeGP as Your GP! She is available to help you with all of your General Practice needs from the end of January 2021 and you can make your appointment with her conveniently online right here – or call our friendly reception team on 0882953200.

All of our doctors here at PartridgeGP are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this ‘Registrars’) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and you can see more about what this involves here. Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars.

We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at PartridgeGP with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

So where to in 2021?

Firstly, for everyone, we believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Secondly, if you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Thirdly, if you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Was 2020 the worst year ever? Perspective.

Well, I said this yesterday. 2020. It’s been a year. Many people are seeking to consign it to the dustbin of history.

For some, it’s been a great year, for others, a horrible year.

Let’s look at history. Has there been a worse year?

Ask medieval historian Michael McCormick what year was the worst to be alive, and he’s got an answer: “536.” Not 1349, when the Black Death wiped out half of Europe. Not 1918, when the flu killed 50 million to 100 million people, mostly young adults. But 536. In Europe, “It was the beginning of one of the worst periods to be alive, if not the worst year,” says McCormick, a historian and archaeologist who chairs the Harvard University Initiative for the Science of the Human Past.

Read on to hear more about the (arguably) worst year in human history…

So where to in 2021?

Firstly, for everyone, I believe that having a usual GP or General Practice is central to each person’s care and recommend that people with any health issues that come to the attention of other health professionals should be advised to attend their usual GP or General Practice rather than a specialised service (ie a place not providing the holistic care a specialist GP would).   If  they say that they don’t have a usual GP or general practice, they should be helped to find one and to actually attend it.

(Hat tip: Dr Oliver Frank)

(TL;DR – Get a regular GP or General Practice and use them!)

Secondly, if you’re employed, get a side hustle and get into business. If you’ve already got a business, get a network. Want to get started? Find your tribe here!

Thirdly, if you are a great GP or a great Allied Health Professional, and you want to serve your clients or patients to the best of your ability, without worrying about all the non clinical things that get in your way, lets talk. Call Mrs Hayley Roberts on 8295 3200 and have a coffee and chat as to how PartridgeGP can help you to help others.

Last but not least, Happy New Year! A little bit of light reading for your holiday break. 2020 was certainly a window of opportunity for me. I hope you find, see, and seize your windows of opportunity in 2021!