Fewer Opioids More Options PartridgeGP Movement Theory

Did you know that here have been some big changes with the pack sizes of immediate release opioids/narcotics under the PBS as of June 1?

 

Me neither!

 

What does this mean in English? It means that doctors will be unable to prescribe large packs of addictive medication without ringing the government and asking for permission (with good reason!). 

 

Why?

 

Some good information can be found here

 

But to summarise:

 

The drugs work in the short term – but they don’t keep working

We have better and safer options

These drugs kill people

 

These changes haven’t been well publicised…but here they are:

 

 

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pbs changes 2

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And:

 

Patients who require long-term treatment of chronic pain with opioids will still be able to access larger pack sizes and prescribers will be able to prescribe repeats where they meet the new restrictions requirements.


For chronic pain, increased quantities and/or repeats may be authorised by Services Australia where the patient meets the restriction requirements. Increased quantities to extend treatment up to one month may be requested via telephone/electronic authority request, and up to 3 months’ supply (up to 1-month quantity and up to 2 repeats) may be requested via an electronic/written authority request.


To be eligible for treatment with high strength opioids such as morphine, patients will need to be unresponsive or intolerant, or have achieved inadequate relief of their acute pain, following maximum tolerated doses of other lower strength opioid treatments.


These new arrangements apply to all PBS listings for opioid medications and therefore there will also be amendments to the tramadol and paracetamol/codeine restriction requirements.


All new and amended restrictions will be updated on the PBS website (pbs.gov.au) from
1 June 2020.

 

What does this change mean for prescribers?


The new opioid listings for reduced pack sizes will provide a simplified way for prescribers to  prescribe smaller quantities of immediate release opioids for acute, short-term treatment.


Prescribers must ensure that patients meet the relevant restriction criteria when prescribing opioids under Restricted Benefit and Authority Required (STREAMLINED) PBS listings. The ‘streamlined authority code’ is located on the relevant PBS listing on the PBS website. To prescribe an Authority Required (Telephone/Electronic) item, the prescriber is required to request authority approval from Services Australia through the Online PBS Authorities System or by calling 1800 888 333.


To ensure appropriate use of opioid medicines for the management of pain, patients must be referred to a pain specialist or alternative prescriber for clinical review if opioid use exceeds or is expected to exceed 12 months. The date of the review and name of the medical practitioner consulted must be provided for every authority application.

 
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Moving Forward

 

So from June 1:

 

  • If these addictive narcotic medications are required, your GP may prescribe smaller packs for your use
  • Please please please speak to your GP about any issues you are having – we have lots of options including counselling, physical therapy, diversional therapy, physiotherapy, non-drug therapy, other medications, and referrals to non-GP specialists for complex problems
  • We still care, we still want to help, we want to be safer and better for you
  • If you are on medications for 12 months or more, you will need to have a formal consult with another GP or specialist in addition to your usual GP to keep getting medication on a PBS (subsidised) prescription. 

 

We are here to help you

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PartridgeGP

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If you would like to work with us, call Dr Nick on 8295 3200 or click here

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Movement Theory

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Are Medically Prescribed Opioids Killing Australians?

In 1996 Oxycontin a drug more powerful than Heroin hit the medical marketplace. It was touted as the cure for any pain, without addiction and without risk. Drug Companies have made many millions from this drug, at the cost of many deaths.
In 2018 we face an evolving crisis following America down a slippery slope, that will cost us our relatives, parents, sons, and daughters if we don’t change.
Partridge Street General Practice is proud to be a low prescriber of opioids, narcotics, and other medications that have NOT been shown to be effective and safe. We will be happy to discuss better options with you right here.

 

Our team – here for You!

Dr Nick Tellis

 

Your Specialist In Life

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

dr nick mouktaroudis at Partridge Street General Practice

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

dr gareth boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Abby Mudford

 

dr abby mudford at Partridge Street General Practice3

Dr Chrissy Psevdos

 

dr chrissy psevdos at Partridge Street General Practice

 

Dr Katherine Astill

(on Maternity Leave from August 2018)

 

Dr Katherine Astill 1

 

 

join the team

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Plastic Pain…and a bit of stimulation!

2018 is here and what have You done? What are You going to do?

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is moving forward with Our Ethos of Professional, Empowering, Comprehensive care from Great GPs!

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill Partridge Street General Practice new female registrar
Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Monika Moy
Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp
Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

when the drugs don’t work

 

 

We are known for not prescribing lots of narcotics. (Not a lot of benzodiazepines either, but that’s another post!). Why is that?

 

 

 

Have a look here…

 

 

 

.💊💊💊💊💊💊💊💩💊💊💊💊💊💊💊.

 

 

 

Firstly, narcotics work differently for acute and chronic pain. Evidence shows that narcotics are effective for short term relief of acute pain after surgery or in an emergency situation, like a broken leg. As time goes on and the acute injury (the break or the surgical procedure) heals or finishes, the side effects of the narcotics increase. Itching and constipation occur, and tolerance leads to a decrease in pain relief. This is chronic pain where opioids are ineffective. Your body produces its own pain relieving chemicals in response to pain or adversity. When you take narcotics or other painkillers, the body STOPS doing this. If you then stop the tablets, the body has to catch up again. This is painful and uncomfortable – We Can Help With That! (without more narcotics…)

 

 

 

There are better alternative  options. We empower our patients in regard to managing their chronic pain. That’s the Partridge Street General Practice way!

 

 

 

 

Acute pain alerts us to injury or disease by sending a signal to the brain, saying “This is where you are hurt – attend to it”. Chronic pain is the afterlife of this acute pain, when the initial pain has affected the bodily tissues and the neurons in our pain system with false alarms, making us believe the problem is in our body when it is mostly in our brain. 


 

 



This evocative description comes from Dr Norman Doidge‘s book ‘The Brain’s Way of Healing’. He describes a scientific theory of neuroplasticity, whereby the brain’s structure and function can be changed without medication, achieving long lasting positive changes.

 

 

 

A book for the mind and the body.

 

 

 

 

Long Lasting Positive Changes are what we’re about at Partridge Street General Practice!

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice drugs of dependence policy

 

 

We’re Here to Help You.

 

 

 

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis