Five People Who Need To See Their GP (But May Not Realise It)

The Runner

 

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Whether you’re already an experienced runner or a complete novice, setting goals — like running a half marathon — can provide the motivation to lace-up those runners each day. But when you’re tackling longer distances and putting your body under more strain than usual, it’s worth keeping in mind that checking in with your GP can ensure you reach the finish line injury free. “A GP might say, ‘let’s have a look at you, what’s your height and weight? Is your time frame realistic?” says Dr Tellis. “They might advise you to look out for shin splints, or what to do if you’re experiencing shortness of breath or chest pains.” And let’s be real, we’re not all just born with a runner’s physique. So if you are concerned about getting in better shape for the big race, it’s worth raising with your doctor. “For a half-marathon, we’d also be advising what you should be eating and drinking and how many calories you should be consuming on a daily basis,” Dr Tellis says.

 

 

The Soon-To-Be Traveller

 

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Whether you’re planning a tour of Europe, a week partying in Bali or a volunteering trip to Africa, your GP can offer you a wealth of advice. That includes options for travel vaccinations, food safety measures to take abroad, and what to include in your first-aid kit. “I also recommend to everyone get the best travel insurance they can afford and to take a close look at the exclusions in there,” says Dr Tellis. “For example, if you go to Bali and get on a scooter after drinking beers, you may not be covered by travel insurance — the cost of medical repatriation from Bali to Australia could be as high as six figures.”

 

 

 

The Couple Planning A Family

 

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You don’t need to wait until you fall pregnant for a trip to the GP — their advice can assist all couples with a healthy conception and pregnancy, by looking at your lifestyle and what might need changing from diet, to sleep, smoking, alcohol and drug consumption. “For women, you want to be taking vitamins with the right amount of folate. You want to be making sure your cervical screening (the new term for the old pap smear test), dental checks and rubella vaccination is up to date and that you’ve had your flu shot,” says Dr Tellis. “For guys, you want to be sure you’re not smoking dope or drinking too much, you want to be looking after your weight and your partner as well.”

 

 

The Exhausted Gym Rat/Bunny

 

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What happens when you think you’re healthy — and hitting the gym regularly — but still feeling exhausted or in pain? A trip to the GP can help pinpoint the cause, and advise on how you can change your training regimen to avoid injury. “A lot of men will hit the gym and do things likely to cause an injury or problem down the track… or they’ll find that big guy at the gym who has some interesting pharmaceuticals of his own. Again, that’s something we can give advice on,” says Dr. Tellis. Meanwhile, women may be suffering from undiagnosed mineral deficiencies, leading to tiredness. “A lot of women can be iron deficient,” explains Dr Tellis, who says he’d ask: “How much sleep are you getting, what are you doing in the gym, is it sustainable to be working 50 hours a week and getting up at 5am daily for Crossfit? Is your thyroid okay, are you getting enough calories in?”

 

 

The Stressed Out Comfort Eater

 

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When you’re working long hours and feeling stressed, it can be easy to find yourself regularly turning to unhealthy fast food lunches or indulging in sugar-filled snacks. While it may be something you feel reluctant to bring up, there are plenty of lifestyle suggestions, resources and referrals that a GP can provide, as well as simply lending a supportive ear. “Part of the skill of being a GP is picking your moments to start a conversation about delicate subjects. Some people come in ready to talk about their weight, some do not. I generally take a weight as part of my routine clinical review/examination, and discuss as I, and the patient, feel appropriate,” says Dr Tellis. He explains there are plenty of ways a GP could assist someone with issues stemming from stress and over eating. It may be a discussion about healthy diet — including good food choices, a better routine and when to eat — or stress management advice, and if necessary, a psychology or counselling referral. “What I would like to say as a doctor is that the door is open. Come in and say hello. You set the agenda as the patient.”

 

*Originally published here

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis

Welcoming Dr Gareth Boucher to Partridge Street General Practice

 

Partridge Street General Practice is very happy to have Dr Gareth Boucher with us long term.

 

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Dr Gareth completed his undergraduate medical studies in Auckland and all of his post-graduate training has been in Adelaide. His medical areas of interest include:

 

  • babies and kids (neonates and paediatrics)
  • emergency medicine,
  • chronic disease management
  • palliative care

 

Outside of work Dr Gareth enjoys cycling, skiing, and photography.

 

 

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He is a GP Palliative Shared Care Provider, as are Dr Tellis and Dr Mouktaroudis. We’ll let Dr Gareth explain this:

 

 

What is palliative care?

Palliative care is holistic care of people with life-limiting illnesses.  Holistic care means we focus on them, not their illness!

Their goals and ambitions

Their mental, physical, and spiritual well-being

Their symptoms

Their dignity

 

We provide care in the community and co-ordinate service providers. We support patients and their families to maintain quality of life and achieve the outcomes important to them.

The Team at Partridge Street General Practice is able to help you and your family with any Palliative Care needs.

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx and our local Medical School at Flinders University.

 


This means that the GPs at Partridge Street General Practice are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

Award Winning Responsibility!

 

 

All of our doctors here at Partridge Street General Practice are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital) or are studying towards these qualifications. This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

 

 

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.
We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at Partridge Street General Practice with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher is a key part of our growing Clinical Team.

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis