Welcoming Dr Abby Mudford to Partridge Street General Practice

dr abby mudford blue at Partridge Street General Practice

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is proud to welcome Dr Abby Mudford to our team! She’s a graduate of the University of Auckland and commenced her specialist General Practice training in February 2018 after three years of post-graduate hospital work at Flinders Medical Centre. Dr Abby has special interests in surgery, skin medicine, and gastrointestinal diseases.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Partridge Street General Practice is an accredited General Practice and is further accredited by our Regional General Practice Training Provider GPEx.

This means that the GPs at Partridge Street General Practice are teaching the Doctors and Medical Students who will be the future of medicine in Australia. It’s a big responsibility and a privilege we take very seriously.

 

 

 

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Teaching Practice of the Year

 

 

All of our doctors here at Partridge Street General Practice are fully qualified ‘Fellows’ (or are studying towards this) holding a specialist qualification with either the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (FRACGP) or the Australian College of Rural and Remote Medicine (FACRRM) or both (3-4 years of full time study and 3 exams on top of an undergraduate university medical degree and supervised trainee ‘intern’ year in a hospital). This is our minimum specialist standard and we may have other qualifications and skills.

Our Fellows provide supervision and advice to our Registrars and you may find that they are called in to consult with the Registrar on your case. ‘Registrars’ are qualified doctors who have completed their hospital training and are now embarking on their General Practice training. Some may already have other qualifications in medical or other fields.
We also supervise and teach Medical Students from Flinders University. They are still studying to become doctors. All of us – Fellows, Registrars, and Medical Students – make up the Clinical Team here at Partridge Street General Practice with our excellent Practice Nurses. We all uphold the highest standards of privacy, confidentiality, professionalism, and clinical practice.

 

 

 

Dr Abby Mudford is a valuable member of our growing Clinical Team and she’s keen to hit the ground running here at Partridge Street General Practice!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Professional. Comprehensive. Empowering.

 

 

 

DR NICK TELLIS

 

Your Specialist In Life

DR NICK MOUKTAROUDIS

 

dr nick mouktaroudis at Partridge Street General Practice

DR GARETH BOUCHER

 

dr gareth boucher

 

DR PENNY MASSY-WESTROPP

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

DR MONIKA MOY

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

DR ABBY MUDFORD

 

dr abby mudford at Partridge Street General Practice3

DR CHRISSY PSEVDOS

 

dr chrissy psevdos at Partridge Street General Practice

Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery with Dr Nick Mouktaroudis at Partridge Street General Practice

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis is a GP and co-owner at Partridge Street General Practice. He’s  passionate about health education, has a special interest in Skin, and a lot of expertise to share when it comes to helping people cope with and improve Skin Conditions. We recently had occasion to have a think about how we started Skin Cancer Surgery and Medicine at Partridge Street General Practice and we have a little story below.

 

Imagine a perfect day in a perfect General Practice. Focus on a busy yet unrushed GP, consulting with another valued patient. The flow of the consult is perfect, the communication great, everything is as it should be. 
 
We have to imagine days like this because they very rarely occur. Flow is fleeting and perfection is often aimed for and seldom reached. 
 
Going back to that consult, we can see that the GP is busy – but is definitely not unrushed. You can feel the pressure in the room as the patient seeks answers and closure and the GP senses the minutes ticking by. The consult comes to a close and both stand, the patient heading towards the door, the GP wishing them well, the patient’s hand is on the door and then. It happens. 
 
‘By the way Doc, what do you think of this?’
 
The GP turns away from the flashing screen and sees, across the room, a spot on the patients leg. 
 
Should we get the patient back at a later date? Offer reassurance we don’t feel confident giving?
 
Or, as the GP in this story does, do you reach for the dermatoscope, call the patient back, and look. There’s no such thing as a quick look and so the light comes out, the gel is applied, and a good thorough look is had. 
 
It’s an ugly duckling, a chaotic little mishmash of colours and globules. 
 
It would turn out to be a nasty – a nasty better appreciated in the pathologist’s dish than in the patients bloodstream.
 
A good result.
 
At the end of the day, the GP sat and wondered how this could be avoided in the future – how could we improve and be better. These challenges see us but we do not always see them.
 
This was our practice and so we had to change. 
 
Plan
Do 
Study
Act
 
Patient safety is paramount. We decided to solve for quality improvement and patient safety at the same time and made the decision to upskill one of our GPs, Dr Nick Mouktaroudis. He undertook multiple courses and extensive study in Primary Care Skin Cancer Medicine, Surgery, Therapeutics, and Dermatology. Following this we spent time and money upgrading our procedure facilities, equipment, and systems to support Dr Nick. We then allocated time for dedicated skin checks and adjusted our online booking and reception protocols. 
 
These were the first steps and in conjunction with our most recent AGPAL accreditation we have repeatedly run through this cycle, improving every time. We now have dedicated times for skin checks and skin cancer surgery, as well as protocols, systems, and education supporting Dr Nick and the other GPs in the practice. Patients enjoy seeing a GP they know and trust who can deliver appropriate care at a Primary Care level and price point. We receive great feedback from patients and local sub-specialists. It’s a clear win for patients, GPs, and our practice – and the mindset of continual quality improvement that we share with AGPAL was the way to get there. 
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What is a Skin Check?

 

 

A Skin Check is a Comprehensive Skin History and Examination which is done at Partridge Street General Practice.

 

Your GP will ask you questions to assess the extent of Your risk/exposure to UV radiation and Your risk of solar related cancers.

 

They will examine you head to toe, examining the skin surface, focusing on any areas of concern (including the eyes, mouth, and anywhere else you may have noticed any spots, lumps, or bumps).

 

 

 

Are there any tools used for the Skin Check?

 

 

A proper examination needs proper equipment and we use handheld LED illumination with magnification as well as polarised light and clinical photography.

 

skin check dr nick mouktaroudis light

A dermatoscope is used to examine specific skin lesions. This is a particular type of handheld magnifying device designed to allow the experienced examiner to further assess skin lesions and determine whether they are suspicious or not.

 

 

 

Who should have a Skin Check?

 

We encourage all Australians over the age of 40 to have a Skin Check annually. Australians have one of the highest rates of skin cancers in the world.

 

Australians who have above average risks should be having Skin Checks before the age of 40 and sometimes more than annually.

 

You should have a Skin Check at any age if You are concerned about Your skin or particular skin lesions/areas.

 

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We ask You to identify any lesions of concern prior to the Skin Check wherever possible.

 

These may include new lesions that You have noticed or longstanding lesions that may be changing in some way or that You are concerned about. If You are worried – Ask!

 

Skin cancer check risk dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Risk factors for skin cancer

 

 

 

People at higher risk of skin cancer are those who:

 

have previously had a skin cancer and/or have a family history of skin cancer

have a large number of moles on their skin

have a skin type that is sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and burns easily

have a history of severe/blistering sunburns

spend lots of time outdoors, unprotected, during their lifetime

actively tan or use solariums or sunlamps

work outdoors

 

 

 

 

Does My GP take photos of My Skin?

 

 

 

During a skin check at Partridge Street General Practice Your GP will ask Your Specific Consent to take photos if they are concerned or want to make note of a particular skin lesion.

Photographs are useful as an adjunct to description of the lesion and act as a reference to position and comparison if required.

The photos will be uploaded onto Your Private Medical Record at Partridge Street General Practice.

 

 

 

What if My GP finds something?

 

 

 

This will depend on what Your GP has found.

 

If they are concerned about a particular skin lesion they may suggest a biopsy to clarify the diagnosis.

 

A biopsy is a surgical procedure during which they take an appropriate sample of tissue from the lesion of concern and send it to a pathologist for review.

 

Generally pigmented lesions (coloured spots), will be biopsied in their entirety whereas non pigmented skin lesions may be sampled partially if the lesion is too large to sample in its entirety.

 

The results of the pathology report will guide further treatment.

 

Your GP may elect to treat without a biopsy if they are confident of the diagnosis.

 

This may include freezing/cauterising a lesion, cutting it out (excising), or offering topical treatments such as creams.

 

Biopsies are scheduled in the Partridge Street General Practice theatre and our Practice Nurse will assist Your GP.

 

 

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What do I wear for a Skin Check?

 

 

 

Comfortable clothing.

 

Your GP will ask to examine you down to your underwear.

 

A sheet or towel will be provided for you to preserve your comfort and dignity.

 

A chaperone (Our Practice Nurse) is always offered.

 

Please avoid makeup or nail polish as the Skin Check involves the face and skin under the nails.

 

 

 

 

How long is a Skin Check?

 

 

Allow half an hour for Your GP to perform a thorough history and examination.

 

 

 

 

Do I need to see My GP or should I see a dermatologist?

 

 

GPs are Primary Care Physicians on the front line of Skin Cancer detection.

All GPs can check your skin, though not all GPs have formal training or a specific interest in skin cancer medicine and dermatoscopy.

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis has trained extensively in General Practice, Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery, and has formal qualifications in Skin Cancer Medicine.

Dermatologists are sub-specialists in all skin conditions including Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery although some will focus on other skin conditions.

 

 

 

 

Can I do more than a Skin Check?

 

 

 

You can Reduce Your risk by:

Avoid unnecessary exposure to the sun

Wearing sunscreen regularly and on all sun exposed areas.

Wear Hats and Sunglasses when appropriate.

Be aware of Your skin – both You and Your partner can check at Home.

 

 

 

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Book Your Skin Check Right Here.

 

 

 

Need more information? Leave a comment or see us in person. We’re Here to Help!

 

 

 

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You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

How to take a good (medical) selfie

Selfies. We’ve all done it. Some good, some bad, some downright embarrassing. However, there are some embarrassing pictures you may want to see the light of day – with your doctor. That funny rash that goes away, that cut you weren’t sure needed stitches or that mole you’ve been keeping an eye on.

 

 

(Unlikely to be a medical issue)

Smartphones and cameras are in our bags and wallets and people are using them!

 

The ABC recognises the medical selfie and here at Partridge Street General Practice we see and take many medical photos.

 

There are many benefits:

We can clarify the lesion/area/rash of concern to You

We can document changes over time or with treatment

We can use the images to obtain a second or subspecialist opinion

We can use the images for teaching and training

 

Of course, we provide the same great high quality service for clinical photography as we do for all of the work in General Practice and so we are guided by information like this.

We also MUST get Your informed consent for all of this! We will ask You whether you are happy with clinical photography, and You can specifically consent to any or all of the above uses. No posting to Facebook!

 

Partridge Street General Practice is proud to provide excellence in General Practice Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery – and great Clinical Photography is part of this. We look forward to helping you with regular skin checks and any treatment you may need. Book your skin check right here.

 

Skin cancer check risk dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

cropped-partridge-street-general-practice-gps.jpeg

Check Your Skin with Dr Nick Mouktaroudis at Partridge Street General Practice

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis is a GP and co-owner at Partridge Street General Practice. He’s  passionate about health education, has a special interest in Skin, and a lot of expertise to share when it comes to helping people cope with and improve Skin Conditions. Let’s hand over to Dr Nick!

 

img_2998

 

 

 

What is a Skin Check?

 

 

A Skin Check is a Comprehensive Skin History and Examination which is done at Partridge Street General Practice.

 

Your GP will ask you questions to assess the extent of Your risk/exposure to UV radiation and Your risk of solar related cancers.

 

They will examine you head to toe, examining the skin surface, focusing on any areas of concern (including the eyes, mouth, and anywhere else you may have noticed any spots, lumps, or bumps).

 

 

 

Are there any tools used for the Skin Check?

 

 

A proper examination needs proper equipment and we use handheld LED illumination with magnification as well as polarised light and clinical photography.

 

skin check dr nick mouktaroudis light

A dermatoscope is used to examine specific skin lesions. This is a particular type of handheld magnifying device designed to allow the experienced examiner to further assess skin lesions and determine whether they are suspicious or not.

 

 

 

Who should have a Skin Check?

 

We encourage all Australians over the age of 40 to have a Skin Check annually. Australians have one of the highest rates of skin cancers in the world.

 

Australians who have above average risks should be having Skin Checks before the age of 40 and sometimes more than annually.

 

You should have a Skin Check at any age if You are concerned about Your skin or particular skin lesions/areas.

 

img_2746-1

 

 

We ask You to identify any lesions of concern prior to the Skin Check wherever possible.

 

These may include new lesions that You have noticed or longstanding lesions that may be changing in some way or that You are concerned about. If You are worried – Ask!

 

Skin cancer check risk dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Risk factors for skin cancer

 

 

 

People at higher risk of skin cancer are those who:

 

have previously had a skin cancer and/or have a family history of skin cancer

have a large number of moles on their skin

have a skin type that is sensitive to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and burns easily

have a history of severe/blistering sunburns

spend lots of time outdoors, unprotected, during their lifetime

actively tan or use solariums or sunlamps

work outdoors

 

 

 

 

Does My GP take photos of My Skin?

 

 

 

During a skin check at Partridge Street General Practice Your GP will ask Your Specific Consent to take photos if they are concerned or want to make note of a particular skin lesion.

Photographs are useful as an adjunct to description of the lesion and act as a reference to position and comparison if required.

The photos will be uploaded onto Your Private Medical Record at Partridge Street General Practice.

 

 

 

What if My GP finds something?

 

 

 

This will depend on what Your GP has found.

 

If they are concerned about a particular skin lesion they may suggest a biopsy to clarify the diagnosis.

 

A biopsy is a surgical procedure during which they take an appropriate sample of tissue from the lesion of concern and send it to a pathologist for review.

 

Generally pigmented lesions (coloured spots), will be biopsied in their entirety whereas non pigmented skin lesions may be sampled partially if the lesion is too large to sample in its entirety.

 

The results of the pathology report will guide further treatment.

 

Your GP may elect to treat without a biopsy if they are confident of the diagnosis.

 

This may include freezing/cauterising a lesion, cutting it out (excising), or offering topical treatments such as creams.

 

Biopsies are scheduled in the Partridge Street General Practice theatre and our Practice Nurse will assist Your GP.

 

 

img_2745

 

 

 

What do I wear for a Skin Check?

 

 

 

Comfortable clothing.

 

Your GP will ask to examine you down to your underwear.

 

A sheet or towel will be provided for you to preserve your comfort and dignity.

 

A chaperone (Our Practice Nurse) is always offered.

 

Please avoid makeup or nail polish as the Skin Check involves the face and skin under the nails.

 

 

 

 

How long is a Skin Check?

 

 

Allow half an hour for Your GP to perform a thorough history and examination.

 

 

 

 

Do I need to see My GP or should I see a dermatologist?

 

 

GPs are Primary Care Physicians on the front line of Skin Cancer detection.

All GPs can check your skin, though not all GPs have formal training or a specific interest in skin cancer medicine and dermatoscopy.

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis has trained extensively in General Practice, Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery, and has formal qualifications in Skin Cancer Medicine.

Dermatologists are sub-specialists in all skin conditions including Skin Cancer Medicine and Surgery although some will focus on other skin conditions.

 

 

 

 

Can I do more than a Skin Check?

 

 

 

You can Reduce Your risk by:

Avoid unnecessary exposure to the sun

Wearing sunscreen regularly and on all sun exposed areas.

Wear Hats and Sunglasses when appropriate.

Be aware of Your skin – both You and Your partner can check at Home.

 

 

 

525436572488

 

 

 

Book Your Skin Check Right Here.

 

 

 

Need more information? Leave a comment or see us in person. We’re Here to Help!

 

 

 

img_8445-2

 

 

You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

 

 

Dr Gareth Boucher

 

 

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

 

 

Dr Monika Moy

 

 

Dr Katherine Astill

 

 

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

 

 

Dr Nick Tellis

 

 

Why do Men taking Viagra get More Skin Cancers?

 

Men who use Viagra seem to have a higher incidence of skin cancer! Why?

Have a look here.

At Partridge Street General Practice we believe an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. Your skin is the largest organ of your body and Australia has the highest rates of skin cancer in the world. How can we help you?

 

 

Firstly, be SUNSMART. 

 

 

– stay more in the shade

– wear a protective hat (I like the Chappell style broad brimmed cricket hat)

– cover up, long sleeved loose fitting clothing keeps you cool and keeps you safe

– sunglasses (also keep you cool 😎)

– sunscreen (SPF>30, re-apply every 2 hrs)

– limit your time in the sun (is there an app for that?)

 

 

 

 

 

Skin cancers can be split into two main groups, melanoma skin cancers (MSC) and non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC).  If you have a close family member with melanoma, or you’ve had a past melanoma, you’re at increased risk of melanoma. If you’ve had non-melanoma skin cancer before the age of 40, you’re at increased risk of melanoma. However, you’re far more likely to have NMSC than melanoma and these are the NMSC risk factors:

 

 

 

– fair complexion

– you burn rather than tan

– light eye colour

– light or red hair

– over 40 years old

– male

– multiple solar keratoses

– high levels of ultraviolet exposure

– previous NMSC (60% of those diagnosed with NMSC will have another within 3 years)

– immunosuppression

 

 

So we’ve covered prevention – what next? If you’re in one of the risk groups above or if you’ve got an area of skin you’re concerned about, check it out and write it down.

 

 

 

 

Then see Dr Nick Mouktaroudis here at Partridge Street General Practice for a comprehensive skin check and treatment plan.

 

 

 

Here to Help

 

 

 

Look after yourself – we’re here to help!

 

 

 Any other questions? You can see any of our Great GPs right here:

Dr Gareth Boucher

Dr Penny Massy-Westropp

Dr Monika Moy

Dr Katherine Astill

Dr Nick Mouktaroudis

Dr Nick Tellis